How can YOU use LinkedIn Learning?

All staff and students at Edge Hill University have access to LinkedIn Learning. It is a library of training courses that you can use to help you develop business, technology, and creative skills.

Desk set out ready for study, with a laptop, phone, notebook and pen, and a cup of coffee.

How can I get started?

There is a LinkedIn Learning page on the Edge Hill University website containing videos that will show you how to set up an account and log in. Once you are in, the How to Use LinkedIn Learning course contains lots of videos about how LinkedIn Learning works.

Can I use it for my own professional development?

Jennifer Rouse Barbeau has written about her use of LinkedIn Learning as part of planned professional development time. Jennifer suggests planning to use 20-25% of your personal development time actually watching the videos and the rest for note taking and hands on practice.

Here at Edge Hill University, Chris Nicholas, a Computer Science Research Assistant, spoke to us about using LinkedIn Learning (when it was called Lynda.com) to improve his knowledge of software development. Oladotun Omosebi, a Computer Science Doctoral Tutor, talked to us about his experiences too.

What courses do you recommend?

Last year Laura Glancey wrote a post on this blog sharing her five favourite courses. Katie McCarthy and Daniel Bresnahan have shared some course recommendations here too.

If you don’t have time to go through a whole course then the weekly tips courses might be for you, or even the new TikTok style Nano Tips courses.

How could I use LinkedIn Learning with my students?

The book ‘Applications of LinkedIn Learning in Ontario’s Post-Secondary Institutions‘, edited by Anne-Marie Taylor shares experiences from a few courses where LinkedIn Learning resources were used. We see the resources being used:

  • to “reduce the burden of creating new content” (Chapter 1)
  • to help students learn to use audio editing software that the teacher was not familiar with (Chapter 2)
  • to replace ‘click-and-follow’ demos in class which weren’t working well (Chapter 3)
  • as a framework for student-led courses. This involved identifying knowledge gaps, looking at available resources, deciding on an area of focus, and developing a curriculum and study plan based on this (Chapter 7).

In Chapter 6 ‘Exemplary Practices for Integrating LinkedIn Learning Video Assets in Online Post-Secondary Courses’, Amanda Baker Robinson advises on three stages of using the videos with students, i.e. preparation, integration and consolidation.

Finally, Xiangping Du reports that some Master’s students found LinkedIn Learning useful for the following things. Your use could take these into consideration.

  • “1. enhancing their knowledge and understanding beyond classroom delivery
  • 2. boosting their professional profile by gaining certificates attached to their LinkedIn profiles
  • 3. improving their research skills and helping with their final research project
  • 4. enhancing their employability by learning industry-relevant technical skills
  • 5. inspiring them to embark on more LiL courses for continuous professional development”
beaumont_smaller
Peter Beaumont
Learning Technology Development Officer

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