Latest

Southport trip in the spring

Southport is a 45-minute drive from Edge Hill and it’s a beautiful, appropriately busy seaside town! From Ormskirk you can take the 375 or 385 bus to get to Southport and pay around £5.5 for a return ticket. Or, if you’re in luck, (which is very likely thanks to our Edge Hill Students Union and International Office), you’ll get a free coach trip like us!

3 things I’d say about Southport:

charming Architecture, tastefully busy and plenty of Shops, all sorts and decorations

……..cool turquoise Lake and simple yet interesting Pier, + beach

lots of ice cream shops, amusement arcades and other family-friendly facilities.

Plus, you’ll also get to see an eye-catching merry go round, first spring blossoms (if you come in spring) and just very pleasant sights in general. For me what’s best was the tasty, affordable Chinese dining we had!

Our Chinese dining: we got spring rolls, stir-fired beef and mushrooms & rice, prawn curry & rice, sweet-and-sour pork & rice. All for only £19.80, so each of us (3 people) paid only £6+ for a very wholesome meal. The restaurant is Ho Lee Chow (address: Rotten Row, Southport PR8 2BZ) and they have various meal deals.

Our group photos in Southport: (caption from Didem and Cassie)

Wait, it rained later! when we got back to the coach.

That’s all for today. Definitely give Southport a visit while you’re at Edge Hill! Thanks for reading!

Check out also:

Thank you Cassie and Didem for your contributions to this blog :D!

From Lancashire to Derbyshire, my past two months in England

COVID-19 has taken the world by storm and we international students definitely ‘ve had our share of turbulence. Hello there! Today is 23 May 2020 and it’s officially been two months since the UK went into lockdown.

In today’s blog, I’d like to capture a little story from the day I parted with my Edge Hill friends as they went back to their home countries. And as I had settled in the countrified town of Hadfield. I would like to call it a “from Lancashire to Derbyshire” story, recounting my move from the lovely halls at Edge Hill/ Ormskirk to my new found home in Hadfield.

20 March: A farewell party

Featuring in this party: 2 Germans, 2 Japanese, 1 Mexican, 1 Vietnamese. Our German girls hosted this party showcasing their cooking talents with Turkish and Vietnamese dishes! (Is there a mistake here, you ask? No dear, our cultural backgrounds are diverse that’s why ;).

Our range of menu: first dish Vietnamese, second and third dishes Turkish

For the next round (of eating!) we’d got Korean dumplings, snacks, and more puddings/desserts.

I would like to thank Aina, Dung, Didem especially, for always being such good friends! I hope we’ll see each other again soon, in Japan or Germany or Vietnam!

  • edge-hill-farewell-party-international-students
  • japanese curry cubes for cooking

21 March (Saturday)

I went to the town centre (of Ormskirk) and it was completely busy, from the shops to the supermarkets to the Open Market, which, honestly, scared me, considering the virus situation and all. So I decided I’d move to my friend’s house in Hadfield. She was really kind to offer me to go and stay with her soon, as she could expect a lockdown coming soon.

Ormskirk’s open-air market (photos for illustration’s sake, from Google)

22 March to 23 May (next 8 weeks): “chilling” in Hadfield

… while at times nervous about the whole situation. Anyway, 23 March to 23 May, featuring: online lectures, online tutorials and my two giant assignments for Term 2. Don’t worry, you won’t have to hear me complain about these. What you’ll see now are (hopefully) beautiful photos of a private garden in Hadfield, a small town in the county of Derbyshire. And while you may not know where Derbyshire is, just know that the world-famous female English author Jane Austen said it’s the most beautiful county in England. (Check out the Pride and Prejudice adaptation on Netflix, you can verify that. Or if you’ve already known, hi-five!)

That’s it for today’s story. I’m sorry it’s quite short (but sweet though!). See you in the next blogs! Thanks for reading!

(If you’d like to know who I am, you can check out my First week at Edge Hill blog. Thanks!)

Check out also:

Lake District – a green oasis and a great escape

Last October (2019) we had a coach trip to Lake District with the Students Union (SU), and it was a lovely memory. This green haven doesn’t disappoint!

What you need to do to get on a free trip like this is to go on the Give it a Go page by the SU, choose the event, log in at the site with your university email, and book a place! Make sure you sign up early for any trip or there will be no spaces left. Another way, if the International Office is the organiser of the trip, you’ll get an email directly from them, and just need to reply to sign up! (check the link out! you’ll see a list of free trips you’ll likely go on!)

A walk around Windermere, Lake District

Expect to see a lot of tourists as Lake District is a much loved travel destination in the UK. We saw a lot of families with kids, and Chinese tourists too. I guess there must be a significant influx of Chinese tourists to Lake District, since there were many signs at restaurants and places of interest written in Chinese.

The trip took us to Windermere area. Lake District is huge comprising 4 major mountainous areas (or towns to be precise). Beside Windermere town, there are also Keswick, Ambleside, and Bowness-on-Windermere. Take a look at this video and you’ll agree with me how beautiful Windermere looks!

Share lunch with a friend

We arrived in Lake District at around 11am, wandered for a while and went for lunch. Now this (Windermere) is a bustling area with all kinds of cuisines and shops. My friend and I were looking for a budget option, so we looked through many menus and prices (at the entrance of restaurants) and stopped at one pizza place.

The pizza we shared (quite a large size) cost only £ 8. Lunch offer even on a Saturday, brilliant!

Alternatively you can pop in Tesco Express near the lake (where the coach dropped you off) to get a meal deal at 3.00 GBP with a main meal, a snack and a drink. (much like Mccoll’s on campus, but a bit cheaper and more choices I guess).

Great spot for photos

Although I didn’t discover much variety in Lake District (probably because I’m a slow walker and a chilled wanderer), I found a few amazing views for my Instagram photos! (or my phone gallery only, haha, too lazy for instagram posts)

  • lake-district-trip-edge-hill-international-student-boats and lake

Few other peaceful shots of the Windermere area!

Keep an eye out for free trips by the International Office and the students’ union, and make sure you sign up early!

Until next time x . Thank you for reading!

Check out also:

O Briens Tea Room in Ormskirk

Dear those who love a chilled afternoon,

Today I recommend a nice place near campus for a (quality & cheap!) cup of tea: O Briens Tea Room.

Location: Opposite Morrisons, same side as Aldi and McDonald’s.

O Briens Tea Room seen from opposite the road at Morrisons store

What’s on their menu

A wide range of tea, ice cream, cafe and toast, sandwiches, or Afternoon Tea.

Their decor and seating

There is nothing fancy about it, but it’s cozy and friendly. Their toilets are nice too, haha. The seating furniture really reminds me of my Vietnam (had to bring it up again, sorry haha).

What I ordered

My friend and I only needed some tea for a chat. It was quite nice, and milk was served with tea as well. Only £ 1.90 for a pot of tea, hands down unbeatable price.

Opening hours (updating) (if you happen to know, please comment. thanks!)

In summary

If you like a simple relaxing time with tea, cake and light meals at affordable price, O Briens is the place to go!

Check out another cafe in Ormskirk: Mandrakes magic-themed cafe!

Check out also:

A guide to washing your clothes at Edge Hill

All students living on campus are advised to use Circuit Launderette (Laundromat, if you’re more familiar with this word). It is located inside the Students Union building, which means you’ll do laundry near Subway and SU Bar. This also means that it is quite near the Hub in the main building (where Starbucks, Mccoll’s and other catering services are). You’ll know where it (the laundry room) is if you go on the campus tour when you just arrived.

Sounds like a mundane thing but actually doing laundry can be a nightmare for new beginning or first-year students. Because you:

  • Have to have a card to pay (visa card, mastercard, or Paypal. In my experience Paypal maybe the most convenient because you don’t have to type in the details every time)
  • Use Circuit mobile app to operate the machines (washing machines, and tumble dryers). There’s no manual way to do it (To be fair, there is one machine that accepts coins, but all the other 30+ machines demands mobile app usage). So, you need internet connection, which is no problem when you have your student ID, account and password. However in the first week when your account has not been set up, you probably need to use mobile data, and the best way to do this is: have a UK SIM card.—Don’t worry the International Office got your back – it’s in the purple welcome bag they’ll give you when you first came (Giffgaff SIM). Set up the sim by topping up some money in using your visa card/mastercard/Paypal, etc.
  • Once you get the two things above sorted, using the laundry app is easy. (See the instructions on the wall inside the laundry room)
  • Pricing: costs 2.9 GBP for a wash and 1.5 GBP for a dry. total 4.4 GBP. yes quite expensive but the bright side is clothes are cleaned and dried properly. I’m pretty happy with its work.

Big advice: Ask for help from other students when you first use the machines in the laundry room. You’ll save yourself a lot of trouble.

Here’s a quick video to let you see what it’s like in the Circuit laundry room at Edge Hill.

Thanks for reading. Until the next post <3

Check out another guide to see the view of the laundry room.

London trip – a must when you’re at Edge Hill!

Coming from an industrial city in Vietnam, I’m familiar with and have come to love such city sights as (medium) skyscrapers and modern buildings, scattered across busy streets and Buddhist temples. I mean they are beautiful, but to see something so different from Asian architecture or normal office buildings would be awe-inspiring. And for me London is just that. It is a “looker”!

I’ve been to Liverpool, Manchester, Chester, Southport, all beautiful cities in their own ways, also with that “difference” I was yearning for, but London seems just another level of impressiveness for me.

Travelling and accommodation costs

To get to London from Ormskirk (where Edge Hill University is based) the most common way is by train from Liverpool Lime Street station. Take a train from Ormskirk to Liverpool Central first, then walk for 5 minutes to Liverpool Lime Street station and there you’ll get a direct train to London (Euston station).

Train tickets: I travelled with 3 of my friends and we managed to book the cheapest return tickets from Liverpool Lime Street to London Euston at only £15.80 (If you don’t plan well ahead it may cost you up to £ 30 each way, which is not too bad)

(In case you’re not familiar with the “language” of train tickets, like I did when I first came, here’s a quick explanation: Single (ticket): one way; Return (ticket): two-way (go and back). There are also “Anytime Single”, “Anytime Return”, “Advance Single”, but I figure I’ll deal with that on another post about travelling by train in the UK.)

Accommodation: We (group of 4) booked Airbnb for 5 nights and the cost for each person was £ 70. There are other websites to find and book cheap hotels or accommodation in London, you might like to do a Google search and shop around.

That’s it for the tips. Now, here are the sights that wowed me in London.

1- Tower Bridge

london-trip-edge-hill-international-student-vietnam-1
  • tower bridge london

On the other side of the Bridge we got to see a Christmas market (because we went there in December).

2. The River Thames

3. London Eye

London Eye

4. Buckingham Palace & Queen Victoria Memorial

Buckingham Palace was packed with tourists
Queen Victoria Memorial was also splendid

5. St James’ Park and St James’ Palace

St James Palace (I’m not sure which one it is but this corner of the street was just marvellous)
St James Park
(There’s a lake right next to me in this picture. The park is much bigger and though in winter, it’s still so beautiful to me, but the winds were too strong!)

6. Household Calvary Museum

This is where you can see the iconic horsemen. I truly loved the experience, although I could see one of the horses was a bit sad when there were so many tourists in front of him.

7. Regent Street

Regent Street is, from what I’ve seen, the street with all the most luxury and high-end brands in London. Every store can become a sight to marvel at, especially Burberry London (in my opinion, I’ve just never seen any fashion store like it). You can also find other affordable brands here, like The Body Shop. Regent Street at Christmas is obviously a must-visit.

  • regent street in london

8. Chinatown and a few other streets (not sure what they’re called because as usual I relied on my friends, heavily)

  • chinatown london
  • St Paul's Catheral

There are so many things to see and do in London. Definitely give London a visit while you’re studying here at Edge Hill!

Halloween at Edge Hill University

I didn’t ever celebrate Halloween when I was in Vietnam (except for that one year in high school where my English teacher organised a costume party as a class activity for us all to enjoy), but I got the very first and special Halloween here at Edge Hill. Below are three events I partook in for Halloween 2019.

1. Halloween makeup event by Students Union

It is a free event in the afternoon of 30 October. Definitely sign up for this, you’ll have so much fun.

2. Halloween theme park at Coronation Park in Ormskirk

A good chance to see so many local families and kids in their creative costumes and makeup. Walk to town center or take the bus, then the park is right near Morrisons, or opposite Aldi and MacDonald’s, very easy to find, Google map is your friend or simply ask a local on your way.

  • halloween-night-theme-park-in-ormskirk-coronation-park
  • halloween-night-theme-park-in-ormskirk-coronation-park-2
  • halloween-night-theme-park-in-ormskirk-coronation-park-3
  • halloween-night-theme-park-in-ormskirk-coronation-park-4-grill-snack
  • halloween-night-theme-park-in-ormskirk-coronation-park-4-grill-snack-5
  • halloween-night-theme-park-in-ormskirk-coronation-park-6

3. A tour around local houses in Ormskirk at Halloween

There’s not much going on but a few houses do get creative with their decorations, and they are very friendly; my friend and I got to talk to a lovely local who clearly did some very good work bringing the Halloween atmosphere to his house, the star of the night definitely being his special ghost on the grass (picture and video below).

  • house-in-ormskirk-halloween-2019
  • house-in-ormskirk-halloween-2019 2
  • house-in-ormskirk-halloween-2019-4
  • house-in-ormskirk-halloween-2019-3
  • house-in-ormskirk-halloween-2019-5
(Thank you my friend Amanda Tang for this video, I hope you don’t mind me re-uploading it on Youtube so that it can be added to this blog)

Thanks for reading! Until the next blog <3

5 Pros and Cons of Studying Abroad

By Zoe Travers 

Pros

1.Ability to travel 

Studying abroad gives you the perfect ability to see as many places as possible for fairly cheap. I would encourage going on weekend trips with other study abroad students or even taking some day trips by yourself, if you’re comfortable. There’s so much to see, and you may never have an opportunity to travel so cheaply, so it’s definitely worth it. You’ll get to learn more about other cultures, and you might start to be more aware of your own culture as well.

2. Free time 

If your experience is anything like mine, I was used to being busy back home. I always felt like I had a million things to do, projects to work on, assignments due, things to do for work. While I was abroad, I had so much free time to just do whatever I wanted. This can be a little bit dangerous because you may start to lose a sense of purpose. If I could change anything, I would have established more structure in my free time with things like going to the gym, picking up a hobby, or reading more. 

3. Growing experience

Study abroad can be a growth-producing experience in so many ways. It’s a huge test of independence to be in another country all by yourself. In all honesty, you’re going to run into some difficulties, whether that’s not being able to figure out how power outlets work in other countries, or whether it’s much deeper than that, you’re kind of on your own at first. And that’s hard. But at a certain point, you have to suck it up and figure things out. Once you get back from studying abroad, it might feel like “oh well now I can do anything!” And that’s so rewarding. 

4. Change of scenery

There’s definitely less dramatic ways of getting a change of scenery than moving to another country, but hey it also definitely works! Sometimes it’s nice just to switch things up a bit in your life, and you might start to feel boxed in at your home university, so studying abroad is a great way to experience another area of the world for a while and just get some new views and new experiences. Also, when you get back, your home might not feel like the “same old, same old” since you’re looking at it from a whole new lens.

5. Getting out of your comfort zone

Studying abroad is a huge decision, and it can be quite intimidating. You might be terrified. And that’s not such a bad thing. Studying abroad is a great way to do something so far outside your comfort zone while you still have a bit of a safety net in school. College is your chance to try new things, learn about yourself, and make some mistakes. For me, I definitely was very comfortable in my hometown, so it was a hard choice to study abroad because I felt like I was starting over. But you can only learn so much staying in one community forever, and home will always be there when you get back. 

Cons 

1.Homesickness/FOMO 

When you’re away from home for three months, you’re bound to miss home. So honestly just go into the experience knowing that. Even if you’re not someone who’s really dependent on family, and you feel like you can go a long time without seeing friends, those little things will hit you. Especially in the age of social media, where you can see all the local events happening in your hometown, or see friends hanging out without you, that can be pretty rough. You might find yourself wishing you’d made a different decision for feeling guilty for spending a semester abroad. Just try to keep yourself in the moment.

2. Regression 

This is a really unique problem that I definitely didn’t think about before I started my study abroad experience. And it might not be a universal problem, but, for me, I went from living in my own apartment, feeling really independent, feeling ready to get my career going, to living in a dorm with other college students and having a meal plan. That’s a hard transition to make, and it knocks you down a couple of notches. To go from feeling like you have this whole “adulting” thing down to feeling like a college freshman again, going through orientation, trying to meet new friends and learn the layout of the school – that’s not easy. What helps me is to remember you have the rest of your life for stability and growth, and it’s okay to save up some of that energy for your post-grad life. Just take it a day at a time, and you’ll be okay. 

3. Potential mental health problems

You’re alone in another country for several months with your support system being miles away, and you’re going through a massively transitional period. So yes, it’s entirely likely you’ll experience some mental health problems. That’s totally normal and totally healthy, but it can be really frustrating. Once you get to campus, try to identify the resources available to you if it hits crisis-mode. Just remember that, even if it just gets unbearable, and you start questioning everything, it’s temporary, and the height of your emotions will pass. It’s also worth noting that if you’re studying abroad to get out of a tough mental health period, you may need to rethink your reasoning. If you’re sad in America, you’ll probably still be sad in another country. 

4. Cost

Let’s just be honest. Study abroad is going to be expensive, and there may even be some unexpected costs along that way that you’ll need to prepare for. Make sure to have enough money in your account that you won’t have to seriously stress about cost while abroad. And if you plan to travel, figure out how much money it will be to visit different countries, and plan to save. Also you can only pack so much in a big suitcase on the way to your study abroad destination, so make sure you’re prepared to go buy things you’ll need for the semester once you arrive. The little things definitely add up, so don’t let it sneak up on you. 

5. Educational roadblocks

Every university is different, and every learning style is different. Be prepared for your new school to approach classes differently. And make sure you’re doing what you can to stay in communication with your school back home. It seems to be an unfortunately common problem that a student ends up on a class that’s different than what they expect, or there’s a problem transferring credits, or maybe they have trouble understanding the grading system. There’s a whole slew of things that could go wrong, so just try to stay in communication with everyone, and don’t back yourself into a corner. 

Study abroad can be a whirlwind of a journey, but it’s ultimately so growth-producing, and there’s so much to learn from the experience. When thinking about studying abroad, remember to take your own personality into account and choose an experience that’s right for you. Don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone, but also know your limits and know what will bring you the most joy and growth. 

Advice from 5 Study Abroad Students

By Zoe Travers

There’s a lot I could say about my study abroad experience. But every person’s experience is totally different. So here is some advice from 5 study abroad students. 

  1. “Don’t be afraid to travel alone and go to as many places as possible. Ask questions. Learn from the locals.”
  2. “I think my biggest advice would be not to be afraid to do things alone. At home I would never have gone out and done something just by myself but here I didn’t know lots of people so there were lots of times I wanted to something but had nobody to go with. The times I decided to go anyways I had so much fun – sometimes I met really cool people but other times I learned to just enjoy my own company and that has made me grow so much. I’m so glad I didn’t miss those opportunities because I was afraid to be alone.” 
  3. “Have your money checked. Have a plan for how much money you’re going to spend every month. Don’t go too crazy buying gifts because you also have to worry about how many things you can bring back home. You have to take into account the weight limit for flights. Have a good plan for when you actually have to prepare for your projects. There comes a time (at least where I’m studying) when everything is being delivered at the last moment. You really need a timetable. I know it’s frustrating, and I know you just want to enjoy your time abroad. But you really have to do it because, otherwise, you would have come for nothing. You still have to do work. The last thing – go exploring. If you’re going to Europe, don’t just stay in the one place you’re at. Go look around. Go see other countries. Go with other people, as much as possible. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity, and you never know when you’re going to come back here.” 
  4. “Let yourself feel everything. If you miss home, let yourself miss home. If you feel like you’re growing, acknowledge that growth. If you’re starting to doubt yourself, acknowledge those feelings. A lot of emotions are going to be crammed into one semester, so just let it happen and try to grow from it. And if you feel overwhelmed, just remember that you moved to another country, and that’s no small feat. Make sure to pat yourself on the back for that.”
  5. “Don’t lose your routine, especially after the initial excitement wears down, it’s important to keep exercising and eating right, as well as doing the other things (makeup, etc.) that allow you to retain a sense of identity (especially in a foreign place where everything is kind of existing in this international void). Also, bring rubbing alcohol if you use it for cleaning (I’m borderline dependent on the stuff and if you can manage to find it in the UK it’s way overpriced) (ditto for white vinegar). Also, expect to feel a bit sad after the first month, or at some point, because evidently it happens to most everyone and it would have been nice to know at the time. Expect it so you can prepare, and have a plan in place in case sadness or panic hits!”

For a closer look at Study Abroad at Edge Hill University, check out this video made last year by Oklahoma City University student Adelaide Ross all about her Edge Hill story!

There’s so much to learn during a semester abroad, and I hope this has been helpful in preparing you for your journey!