Support for Syrian academics CARA

THE has recently published on the state of Syrian universities and Syrian academics in exile.

CARA, the charity set up in 1933 to support academics escaping Nazism, supports universities in the UK to host refugee academics. In the North West, major universities including Liverpool John Moores and Liverpool Hope are members, enabling refugee academics to teach and research in safety.

CARA are also supporting refugee Syrian academics to conduct research in collaboration with UK universities: Continue reading

New scholarship for refugees: humanities (English, History, Geography and more)

Via The Refugee Support Network

*The Schwab and Westheimer Trust is delighted to announce a new scholarship for students from asylum-seeking backgrounds. *

This new scholarship, supported by the Marks Family Charitable Trust, is open to students embarking on a three year humanities degree programme at undergraduate level, or a postgraduate masters degree in humanities. Only candidates with proven excellent academic record/achievement will be considered.

The scholarship will cover ‘home’ tuition fees (up to £9,500 per year).

Applicants will need to demonstrate that they can cover their living costs whilst at university. The scholarship will be awarded to students who have an asylum-seeking background and people who are not eligible for student finance will be prioritised.

Applications will open on 15th June 2019, and the deadline for applications is midnight on 9th July 2019. Interviews for successful candidates will be held in July 2019, in London.

You can apply online here.

Refugee Week 17-23 June 2019

Refugee week 2019 is next week!  Check out the free resources to celebrate refugee week online via the website.

The site includes a wide range of education resources including lesson plans and resources for primary and secondary classes. We’d love to hear what you’re doing for Refugee Week – share via Action for Refugees twitter or if you’re an FoE student via @EHU_FOE

Scholarships – Westheimer Health

The Refugee Support Network are currently accepting applications (until 27th May) for the ‘Westheimer Scholarship’, a funding opportunity for asylum seekers (up to aged 28) to pursue HE in health and social care, medicine, nursing or related professions.

Funding is available for up to 3 people each year for fees and living costs.

Full details are available on the Refugee Support Network site.

Please share!

 

Student Action for Refugees – visit 22nd May

Maddy Robinson of STAR (Student Action for Refugees) will be speaking about the work of this national NGO, formed by students, which now makes up a national network. She will be discussing the diverse voluntary work carried out by students across the UK, and their influential campaign work including changing universities’ policies for HE Access.

Edge Hill was one of of the first universities to offer fee waivers for students unable to continue their studies due to their refugee status: STAR campaigns to ensure that access is supported and improved, reflecting the demands of students that their university is a place where everyone is welcome, and equality matters.

Find out how you can get involved at 1pm 22nd May E19 (FoE Lakeside)

With thanks for the support of I4P

What is STAR?

STAR is a national charity of 27,000 students welcoming refugees to the UK. Together we:

  • Volunteer at local refugee projects
  • Campaign to improve the lives of refugees
  • Educate people about refugees and asylum

STAR is made up of 46 groups at universities and colleges across the UK and a national team which co-ordinates and supports the groups. STAR groups are students’ union societies which are affiliated to the charity. The charity is governed by STAR’s Board of Trustees, elected annually by the students themselves.

Check out this video of Shrouk El Attar, Cardiff STAR and STAR trustee, to find out what STAR is all about!

RefuAid Language Scholarship Programme set for Liverpool launch

Mohib Ullah, who is leading on the project for RefuAid told us, “We are working with one of our partner schools in Liverpool and will be starting an OET (Occupational English Test accepted by the General Medical Council as an alternative to IELTS for re-qualification) course for healthcare professionals after Easter. The course will be 6 hours a week and will initially run for 6 weeks, starting on Wednesday the 24th of April. We welcome applications from refugee/asylum seeker doctors, nurses and midwives etc. They can also email me in person at mohib@refuaid.org I will be happy to answer any questions they may have. During the course, we will pay travel expenses up to £500, and the exam fee when applicants are deemed as exam-ready by their tutors.”

Action for Refugees think that this is a brilliant initiative with potentially great benefits to candidates and the communities they will serve. We wish RefuAid every success with this important programme.

Reflecting realities, preparing new professionals

Karen Morris sharing her collection of refugee-themed picturebooks at the AfR conference, 2017

Karen Morris writes

In schools and other settings, our graduates play a significant role in the lives of pupils and encounter personal, ethical and moral dilemmas which are often unconnected with the taught curriculum. They need to be able to draw on a teaching philosophy that is distinctive and personally informed but reflects ethical values and principles. Such a philosophy needs to be responsive to the demands of a changing world where social, political, economic and environmental issues have a significant impact on the lives of children and young people. As a primary English tutor this is a key part of my role in preparing future professionals. Continue reading

RefuAid seminar results in action for refugees

Anna Jones, co-founder of RefuAid, at the Action for Refugees seminar at Edge Hill University.

Delegates to the RefuAid seminar held at Edge Hill University’s Ormskirk campus on 20 March were enthralled by the presentations, not least by the moving testimony given by former client Naima, who told us about her former life in Libya and the role played by RefuAid in turning her life around. RefuAid co-founder, Anna Jones, explained how the organisation provides practical support to refugees and asylum seekers in key areas of access to language support, education and employment.

Dentist and former RefuAid client Naima shared her powerful story with us.

The audience for the seminar included academic and support staff at EHU as well as visitors from the local community. It was particularly pleasing to welcome a number of refugees and asylum seekers on campus.

Immediately following the presentations, delegates were able to engage in discussion with both the RefuAid representatives and Action for Refugees group members. Much of this discussion concerned the practical support that delegates from our refugee community wanted from RefuAid and from Edge Hill University.

Feedback from delegates has been overwhelmingly positive with many delegates taking the time to thank the presenters personally for the seminar. One email received from a delegate since the event included the following, “I’m so pleased to be at the university and thank you for the help you have given me.”

Since the event, applications for support from RefuAid have been prepared by some delegates with the help of Action for Refugees group members. Referrals have also been made to other organisations with a view to providing expert support for individuals to gain employment. Plans for future working between RefuAid and the University are being put in place. Action for Refugees is keen that the knowledge exchanged at this event will provide a basis for a fruitful partnership with RefuAid that will reflects principles of inclusivity, equity, and social justice.

Left to right: Naima and Anna (RefuAid), Malik (Syrian Cultural Centre), Kate (RefuAid), Mike (EHU)

 

Migrants and Refugees in Education: A toolkit for teachers

Learn how to teach and support young people across the globe affected by violence, conflict or displacement.
This free, online course developed by the British Council is designed to help teachers support students who are dealing with trauma.
Experienced teachers talk about the challenges, what they have learnt and the strategies they have used when teaching migrant and refugee learners both in countries affected by conflict and in host countries. All teachers and volunteers working with refugees and migrant learners can find ideas and strategies that can be used to better understand learners. The course helps to build inclusive classrooms and develop learners’ confidence, taking into account the languages they know and their cultures.
Click here to find out more.