Write Articles, Not Blog Posting

The web guru Jackob Nielsen in a recent article is arguing that people should write articles and not quick blog posting entries, but he’s actually focusing on business blogging if they want to make money.

Blog postings will always be commodity content: there’s a limit to the value you can provide with a short comment on somebody else’s work. Such postings are good for generating controversy and short-term traffic, and they’re definitely easy to write. But they don’t build sustainable value. Think of how disappointing it feels when you’re searching for something and get directed to short postings in the middle of a debate that occurred years before, and is thus irrelevant.

Read his article ‘Write Articles, Not Blog Posting‘ , as the way he handles the matter is quite interesting and he’s backed his argument with some impressive stats.

Published by Janeth Howarth

I'm passionate about web developments and excited by new trends and web technologies. Love travelling, dance, photography, books, music, and the arts.

One reply on “Write Articles, Not Blog Posting”

  1. I’m glad that he acknowledges that it’s not the blog in itself that it at fault, but the author:

    Obviously, I am referring to the user experience and to the style of the content in this analysis; not to the technology used to serve up this content. Thus, what I call “articles” might be hosted on a weblog service.

    A blog, as opposed to other forms of website such as forums or hierarchical content structures have certain benefits. Forums tend to be full of problems without solutions. Bloggers do sometimes post questions but since it is their blog, if they ever find the answer they are more likely to give it. There’s not the compulsion to go back to every forum or mailing list that you asked a question on and give the answer.

    The interactive features of blogs – trackbacks and comments – mean that blogging is much more engaging than a static site. Much of the useful content is to be found here rather than in the post and it’s this conversation with users that makes blogs so useful.

    With our blog we’re not just centred on the “blogosphere” – we also need to engage our own community within Edge Hill and so there’s a balance to strike between creating new, useful content, engaging with the wider blogging community, but perhaps most importantly, showing our colleagues the best of what’s out there.

Comments are closed.