I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing (In Perfect Harmony)

Andy Clarke’s presentation at @media 2007 was concerned with international styles in web design, some interesting questions arose.

I was interested in why designers felt that they needed to conform to an international design style rather than adapting regional traditions in design to the web.

For example would an Italian designer look to adapt Giovanni Pintori’s classic typography for Olivetti to the web, or would they regard themselves as a world citizen designing in a universal medium where local traditions and innovations were insignificant?

Is there really an international style?

One thing I noticed when I started looking at CSS Gallery websites was that there appeared to be a specific look and feel to a design that wanted to say:

“I am a Standards Compliant CSS Website”

I feel that a lot of European designers began using American design styles because the first wave of Standards Compliant CSS Websites were American, and this trend has stuck.

The main difference would be in Typography, Europe gave us Sans Serif fonts like Helvetica and Eurostile. Whereas Americans’ prefer serif fonts like Georgia and Palatino. Serif fonts are now much more common in Europe.

Another striking thing about American design is a sense of history, a lot of contemporary design has a retro look, a certain early 60’s American Graffiti influence. The continuing vogue for logos with a flowing hand written feel like Coca Cola is evidence of this. Coca Cola incidentally have gone retro, and their new cans have simple flat colour and clean traditional type, rather than the recent fad for gradients and drop shadows, an interesting diversion.

Coca Cola Redesign

Americans also like to use a lot of texture and bring organic elements into web design, whereas European designers were always quite evangelical about white space. Nowadays Europeans’ have gone crazy about colour gradients.

One of the biggest American influences has been Apple Computers. Appletastic black and grey gradient backdrops are ubiquitous, as is typography with a faded reflection or shadow. It’s neat and tasteful, but it’s becoming homogenised. Websites don’t need look like an Apple product in order to appear more Web 2.0.

So I think there has been a move towards a universal style in web design. This could subconsciously reflect a medium without old rules and boundaries, but where is the variety?