GROWING UP IN AFGHANISTAN Photography Exhibition @EHU

HALE HALL Edge Hill University
Monday 24th September —Thursday 4th October 2018

This is a ten day exhibition of the work of freelance photographer Mr Guy Smallman.   The exhibition will take up residency in Hale Hall for 10 days and involve a display of selected  photographs from Mr Smallman’s time in Afghanistan.

Visitors are welcome to drop in to view it at any time.

Mr Smallman will then join us at Edge Hill on Thursday 4th October 12-1pm to discuss his work and answer questions.

Guy Smallman is a self taught, London based photojournalist. He has worked all over the world in many different countries and environments specializing in social issues like human rights and poverty.

Since 2008 his main focus has been Afghanistan. His work from that country has appeared in many publications including most UK newspapers, FT Weekend magazine, Channel 4 news and the BBC to name but a few. He was also interviewed for John Pilger’s documentary film ‘The War You Don’t See’ after he became the only foreign journalist to reach the scene of the Granai massacre in Taliban controlled Farah province.

During his time in Afghanistan he has built a long term relationship with the internally displaced people living in terrible conditions in camps around Kabul. His exhibition features their children, many of whom were born in the camps.

For more information go to: http://guysmallman.com/

Please contact educationresearch@edgehill.ac.uk for further information and to register for the event on the 4th October.

The Wanderers Wanderers – AfR@football

On a warm July evening the Wanderers Wanderers took to the field in the annual staff football tournament in memory of Tom Bell. The organisers were kind enough to welcome players from the local refugee community to take part in the tournament for a second year.

An intended outcome for the Action for refugee group is provide practical support to refugees, asylum seekers and those agencies working with them. Football provides an enjoyable and practicable vehicle to do this.

Staff from Edge Hill played in the tournament team. In addition trainees and staff have played matches organised by Dr Jack Sugden from the Faculty of Arts and Science. Jack has extensively researched the ability of sport to bring groups together. 

The Department of Education and Communities (within the Faculty of Education) has within its vision identified the importance of ‘ valuing and engaging with all our diverse communities’. Primary trainee teachers have taken part in Refugee Welcome days that include football as an important aspect.

If you are interested in getting involved with football and the wider community please contact

Dr Jack Sugden (sugdenj@edgehill.ac.uk)

Martin Ford (fordm@edgehill.ac.uk)

 

Prof John Diamond supports Action for Refugees

Mike Stoddart writes….

Mike Stoddart

Action for Refugees was formed as a grouping of academics, support staff and students at Edge Hill University who felt a common need to respond to the plight of refugees and asylum seekers in the UK and abroad.

The initial spark was created by a presentation given by members of staff in the Faculty of Education on their work as volunteers in the Calais Jungle. This prompted a multi-faceted response that included fund-raising, volunteering, curriculum developments and knowledge sharing and transfer events. Perhaps most importantly, the group engaged on a number of levels with refugees, asylum seekers and organisations working to support them.

We aim to promote a multi-faceted, positive, response to the refugee crisis that results in a greater understanding of and practical support for those involved.

Our intended outcomes are to:

  1. Share relevant research.
  2. Increase knowledge and understanding of the refugee crisis.
  3. Provide practical support to refugees, asylum seekers and those agencies working with them.
  4. Ensure that all teacher-training graduates from the Faculty of Education are better able to meet the learning requirements of refugees.
  5. To learn from the experiences, skills and knowledge of refugees and asylum seekers.

We are very keen to ensure that the development of the group is led by the priorities of those directly involved. It is important to us that the group is open to refugees and asylum seekers as well as representatives from the wide range of organisations working to support them.

Prof John Diamond writes…

Prof John Diamond

The work colleagues  – staff and students  – are undertaking across both the Faculty of Education and the wider University to support refugee and asylum seekers and the various NGO support groups that exist here in the North West of England are a very real and practical example of how skills, knowledge and ideas can be shared and the effect of which can be transformative.

Continue reading