GROWING UP IN AFGHANISTAN Photography Exhibition @EHU

HALE HALL Edge Hill University
Monday 24th September —Thursday 4th October 2018

This is a ten day exhibition of the work of freelance photographer Mr Guy Smallman.   The exhibition will take up residency in Hale Hall for 10 days and involve a display of selected  photographs from Mr Smallman’s time in Afghanistan.

Visitors are welcome to drop in to view it at any time. Continue reading

Imagining community through sport at Edge Hill University

Dr Jack Sugden

In 1983 Benedict Anderson wrote ‘Imagined Communities’, a book that pointed out, among other things, that the communities, towns, cities and especially nations in which we live are not actually real. Although they might feel real to us, part of our lives, our identities, have you ever actually seen an England? Touched a Manchester? The point I make here, in an admittedly abstract way, is that we dwell in a world in which we are divided by many categories and identity hooks that are essentially made up.

The United Kingdom only exists because we all agree it does, just as we agree to follow, uphold and even celebrate its laws and culture. If we were to wake tomorrow having forgotten the UK, it might be a nightmare in terms of law and order, but we may also feel free, albeit isolated and alone. As though these categories and labels dive us they also unite us, giving us commonalities that we share, and which make us feel safe, like we belong. It is this exact feeling of collective national consciousness that captivates the nation during a royal wedding, at times of national crisis, or during the football world cup, the last two being much the same.

Football for Peace in Jerusalem, Jewish and Arab kids pre-game

 In terms of sport, from growing up in Belfast during the “troubles” I was witness to bitter and divisive nature of sport, but also, fleetingly, its capacity to cross the sectarian divide through a football team made up of both Protestants and Catholics called ‘Belfast United F.C.’ Continue reading

Where it all Began – A Stand and Be Counted Production

Imagine if everyone was ordered to return to their place of birth.

The UK’s first Theatre Company of Sanctuary, Stand and Be Counted present a wild and vivid vision of the future, combining storytelling, movement and live music.

Coming to Liverpool at the Unity Theatre, Liverpool 9th October.

Tickets £10.50 (£8.50 concessions)
Click here for a trailer and further details

The Wanderers Wanderers – AfR@football

On a warm July evening the Wanderers Wanderers took to the field in the annual staff football tournament in memory of Tom Bell. The organisers were kind enough to welcome players from the local refugee community to take part in the tournament for a second year.

An intended outcome for the Action for refugee group is provide practical support to refugees, asylum seekers and those agencies working with them. Football provides an enjoyable and practicable vehicle to do this.

Staff from Edge Hill played in the tournament team. In addition trainees and staff have played matches organised by Dr Jack Sugden from the Faculty of Arts and Science. Jack has extensively researched the ability of sport to bring groups together. 

The Department of Education and Communities (within the Faculty of Education) has within its vision identified the importance of ‘ valuing and engaging with all our diverse communities’. Primary trainee teachers have taken part in Refugee Welcome days that include football as an important aspect.

If you are interested in getting involved with football and the wider community please contact

Dr Jack Sugden (sugdenj@edgehill.ac.uk)

Martin Ford (fordm@edgehill.ac.uk)

 

Dr Julia Hope: Children’s Literature about Refugees

Visiting from Goldsmiths’ University, last week Dr Julia Hope shared with the faculty her wealth of experience from her PhD research and a decade as a ‘refugee teacher’, working with children from a refugee background in the classroom.

Her paper explored the range of ways in which children’s books can support children with a refugee background to recognise themselves in fiction, as well as the opportunity for children without these experiences to develop empathy and understanding. Her examples demonstrated that even very young children can through discussion and art demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of the reasons people leave, and what it might be like to come to a new classroom, a new school, a new country.

 

Feedback from the session was excellent. One delegate stated, ‘Excellent session –   thoroughly enjoyed it. Thankyou!’ Another, who is a trainee teacher commented, ‘We need more talks like this.’ Students and staff plan to read more of the titles Julia included in her presentation, approaching them critically, and seeking to undertake research in the area. Others reflected on the way the session would help in the classroom to work with refugee families and children.

 

Language Support for Adult Refugees – A Council of Europe Toolkit

From the council of Europe website:

The Council of Europe has developed the toolkit presented on this website (available in seven languages) to support member states in their efforts to respond to the challenges posed by unprecedented migration flows. It has been produced as part of the project Linguistic Integration of Adult Migrants (LIAM) of the Council of Europe’s major Programme on language policy.

The toolkit comprises the 57 tools and other resources contained in the various sections of this website. Tools can be downloaded and adapted to meet the needs of different contexts

The toolkit is designed to assist organisations, and especially volunteers, providing language support for adult refugees. Throughout the toolkit “refugee” is understood in a broad sense and includes asylum seekers as well as refugees.

Further details are available here https://www.coe.int/en/web/language-support-for-adult-refugees

Event: Dr Julia Hope – Children’s Literature About Refugees 14th May

‘Children’s Literature About Refugees: A Catalyst in the Classroom’

DR JULIA HOPE, GOLDSMITHS COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

Monday 14th May 2018 at 1.00pm, Room E1

This seminar welcomes Julia Hope, author of, ‘Children’s Literature About Refugees: A Catalyst in the Classroom’.  This book addresses one of our most pressing global issues – often called “the migrant crisis” – in a form accessible to younger children.

For child refugees to feel that their experiences are validated, and for others to understand their situation, engaging with the growing field of children’s texts on the subject is crucial.  Teachers also need to be encouraged to find ways in to tackle such challenging topics, with fiction providing the perfect catalyst.

In exploring the use of Mary Hoffman’s The Colour of Home and Beverley Naidoo’s The Other Side of Truth in the classroom, this book is indispensable for educators in the younger age range, and for researchers who are interested in controversial children’s literature.

Organised by the Faculty of Education and sponsored by I4P, this event will take place in the Faculty of Education, room E1.

More Information and Registration

Free course: Working Supportingly with Refugees

A new online course, Working Supportingly with Refugees: Principles, Skills and Perspectives, commences on Monday 21 May.  The course will run for three weeks and is free to access. Attendance is flexible and self-paced, participants can enrol any time before or after starting date to complete the course.

You can access it here – https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/cultural-mediation/1

What topics will you cover?

  • The basics about human migration, refugees and legal framework
  • Cultural diversity and interethnic relations
  • Socialisation, conflict resolution and social inclusion
  • Principles on psychological well-being and socio-emotional health in refugee cases. Strategies for the mediator to support the target group and their own self-care
  • Communication and interpreting in contexts of cultural mediation
  • The practice of cultural mediation in the reality of refugees

The course has been developed by the GRAMNet academics and practitioners  at the University of Glasgow with the support of EU Erasmus + funding for the ReCULM project led by an international team of partners from Greece – National Centre for Social Research, Italy –University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Spain – University of Almeria  and the UK – University of Glasgow.