Brexit, EU Settlement Scheme and the forced (im)mobility of EU citizens in the UK

Guest post by Agnieszka Martynowicz and Agnieszka Radziwinowiczówna. Agnieszka M. is a Senior Lecturer in Criminology at Edge Hill University. Her research interests include migration(s), criminal justice and human rights, in particular in the context of imprisonment and immigration detention. Her current research focuses on deportations of Polish citizens after their contact with the criminal justice system. Agnieszka R. is a Marie Curie Research Fellow at the University of Wolverhampton, where she is undertaking a two-year research project ‘Brexit and Deportations: Towards a Comprehensive and Transnational Understanding of a New System Targeting EU Citizens’ (BRAD).

Originally posted on the Border Criminologies blog. 

The Brexit Referendum of 23rd June 2016 became one of the most defining moments in British politics and social life in at least a generation. Achieving an overall majority of 51.9%, the supporters of the UK leaving the European Union (EU) secured a narrow victory. The UK Government started the exit process at the end of March 2017, developing a host of new policies and legislation to enable the ‘disentangling’ of UK’s current ties with the EU. This includes pursuing a goal of ending the freedom of movement (FOM) for EU citizens into the UK on (or soon after) the exit date.

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Migration Working Group North-West

Action for Refugees supports the Migration Working Group North-West, led by Edge Hill academic Dr Zana Vathi. Members of AfR are affiliated to this new group, which brings together academics and activists across the region working in, or researching migration in the North-West. Affiliated members beyond Edge Hill include arts, health and housing organisations based in the region.

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Free event at Manchester Metropolitan University – International Day for Tolerance – ‘Professional Action and Practice for Refugees and Displaced People’ Saturday 17 November 2018

As part of the International Day for Tolerance, our friends at Manchester Metropolitan University and PAPYRUS Team cordially invite you to this event which aims to:

* promote organisations working with refugees, asylum-seekers and displaced people

* create an open, listening and debating space for practitioners, researchers, stakeholders and relevant NGO’s in the broad areas of work with refugees and displaced people to come together and learn

* value perspectives from across various sectors and create opportunities for new connections, creativity and engagement

* create a productive place for learning about new areas and sharing materials and resources helpful in work with refugees and displaced people.

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Upcoming free event – Online Arabic from Palestine and ‘Linguistic Hospitality’ – Migration Working Group Seminar 15th November 2018

Migration Working Group – North West invites you to the second seminar organised by the group at Edge Hill University. This seminar will focus on the process of online collaboration to design an Online Arabic language course. Continue reading

Seminar: Prof Adrian Favell (University of Leeds) ‘From political economy to political demography: beyond methodological nationalism’.

The Migration Working Group – North West is holding its inaugural seminar on 19th of October 2018 at 2pm. Migration Working Group-North West brings together academics, organisations and practitioners working on migration who are either based in the North West of the UK, or researching migration in this region (including Action for Refugees). For the inaugural talk, the group have invited Prof Adrian Favell (University of Leeds) to share his work on ‘From political economy to political demography: beyond methodological nationalism’.

For more information about this free event and to register please see the event page.

Imagining community through sport at Edge Hill University

Dr Jack Sugden

In 1983 Benedict Anderson wrote ‘Imagined Communities’, a book that pointed out, among other things, that the communities, towns, cities and especially nations in which we live are not actually real. Although they might feel real to us, part of our lives, our identities, have you ever actually seen an England? Touched a Manchester? The point I make here, in an admittedly abstract way, is that we dwell in a world in which we are divided by many categories and identity hooks that are essentially made up.

The United Kingdom only exists because we all agree it does, just as we agree to follow, uphold and even celebrate its laws and culture. If we were to wake tomorrow having forgotten the UK, it might be a nightmare in terms of law and order, but we may also feel free, albeit isolated and alone. As though these categories and labels dive us they also unite us, giving us commonalities that we share, and which make us feel safe, like we belong. It is this exact feeling of collective national consciousness that captivates the nation during a royal wedding, at times of national crisis, or during the football world cup, the last two being much the same.

Football for Peace in Jerusalem, Jewish and Arab kids pre-game

 In terms of sport, from growing up in Belfast during the “troubles” I was witness to bitter and divisive nature of sport, but also, fleetingly, its capacity to cross the sectarian divide through a football team made up of both Protestants and Catholics called ‘Belfast United F.C.’ Continue reading

Event: Dr Julia Hope – Children’s Literature About Refugees 14th May

‘Children’s Literature About Refugees: A Catalyst in the Classroom’

DR JULIA HOPE, GOLDSMITHS COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

Monday 14th May 2018 at 1.00pm, Room E1

This seminar welcomes Julia Hope, author of, ‘Children’s Literature About Refugees: A Catalyst in the Classroom’.  This book addresses one of our most pressing global issues – often called “the migrant crisis” – in a form accessible to younger children.

For child refugees to feel that their experiences are validated, and for others to understand their situation, engaging with the growing field of children’s texts on the subject is crucial.  Teachers also need to be encouraged to find ways in to tackle such challenging topics, with fiction providing the perfect catalyst.

In exploring the use of Mary Hoffman’s The Colour of Home and Beverley Naidoo’s The Other Side of Truth in the classroom, this book is indispensable for educators in the younger age range, and for researchers who are interested in controversial children’s literature.

Organised by the Faculty of Education and sponsored by I4P, this event will take place in the Faculty of Education, room E1.

More Information and Registration

From our inbox (March 28th)

More events, calls for papers, new research and other information related to work with refugees that we think should be shared.

Documentary about seeking asylum in the UK and the detention process.

Qualitative Research Symposium ‘Understanding Migration’ is to be held on the 12th April at UEA, designed to be as accessible and interactive as possible for interdisciplinary staff and PGR students working in migration research. For more information see their website.

British Academy funded research into urban refugees’ experiences in the Global South reports in their new blog.

Learning resources designed to facilitate an exploration of LGBT and migrant lives and, more generally, an engagement with issues of equality and diversity, are now available to download from ‘Intimate Migrations’:

For any enquiries about these resources please email Francesca Stella.

 

If you have any events or information you would like to see here, please email a4r@edgehill.ac.uk

From our inbox (March 15th)

There’s a lot of events, calls for papers, new research and other information related to work with refugees that we think needs to be shared as widely as possible.

At Edge Hill, a new Migration Working Group has been set up, led  by Dr Zana Vathi.

Gramnet (the network for community members and scholars working in the field of migration and refugee studies at Glasgow University) is currently promoting their film series. Maybe this kind of film event is something we should look at hosting in EHU?

Natakallam is a new online social venture, aiming to link refugees with communities globally through language teaching. You can make a connection with a refugee in camps in Syria, and hear about the refugee crisis first hand.

Care4Calais’ latest news reports the French government’s provision of food for refugees (and the problems with it).

Action for Refugees is very interested in how refugees access university – we’re keen to find out more about that experience. We’re not the only ones: a new researcher in access to HE is looking for refugee participants to talk about their experiences of accessing university. STAR, the university based student network for refugees are currently advertising for an Access to University coordinator.

For those looking for support now, the Refugee Support Network can offer advice to young people (18-25) looking to apply to university, by phone and email. Closer to home, find out about applying for EHU’s Sanctuary Scholarship scheme here.