Seminar: Prof Adrian Favell (University of Leeds) ‘From political economy to political demography: beyond methodological nationalism’.

The Migration Working Group – North West is holding its inaugural seminar on 19th of October 2018 at 2pm. Migration Working Group-North West brings together academics, organisations and practitioners working on migration who are either based in the North West of the UK, or researching migration in this region (including Action for Refugees). For the inaugural talk, the group have invited Prof Adrian Favell (University of Leeds) to share his work on ‘From political economy to political demography: beyond methodological nationalism’.

For more information about this free event and to register please see the event page.

Growing up in Afghanistan: Exhibition is open

Guy Smallman and Clare Woolhouse in Hale Hall.

The Growing up in Afghanistan exhibition is now open.  Guy Smallman visited the university to set up his photographs in Hale Hall. On Thursday 4th October 12-1pm there will be an opportunity to hear Guy discuss his work and answer questions in a short talk.

Please contact educationresearch@edgehill.ac.uk to reserve your place.

GROWING UP IN AFGHANISTAN Photography Exhibition @EHU

HALE HALL Edge Hill University
Monday 24th September —Thursday 4th October 2018

This is a ten day exhibition of the work of freelance photographer Mr Guy Smallman.   The exhibition will take up residency in Hale Hall for 10 days and involve a display of selected  photographs from Mr Smallman’s time in Afghanistan.

Visitors are welcome to drop in to view it at any time.

Mr Smallman will then join us at Edge Hill on Thursday 4th October 12-1pm to discuss his work and answer questions.

Guy Smallman is a self taught, London based photojournalist. He has worked all over the world in many different countries and environments specializing in social issues like human rights and poverty.

Since 2008 his main focus has been Afghanistan. His work from that country has appeared in many publications including most UK newspapers, FT Weekend magazine, Channel 4 news and the BBC to name but a few. He was also interviewed for John Pilger’s documentary film ‘The War You Don’t See’ after he became the only foreign journalist to reach the scene of the Granai massacre in Taliban controlled Farah province.

During his time in Afghanistan he has built a long term relationship with the internally displaced people living in terrible conditions in camps around Kabul. His exhibition features their children, many of whom were born in the camps.

For more information go to: http://guysmallman.com/

Please contact educationresearch@edgehill.ac.uk for further information and to register for the event on the 4th October.

Where it all Began – A Stand and Be Counted Production

Imagine if everyone was ordered to return to their place of birth.

The UK’s first Theatre Company of Sanctuary, Stand and Be Counted present a wild and vivid vision of the future, combining storytelling, movement and live music.

Coming to Liverpool at the Unity Theatre, Liverpool 9th October.

Tickets £10.50 (£8.50 concessions)
Click here for a trailer and further details

The Wanderers Wanderers – AfR@football

On a warm July evening the Wanderers Wanderers took to the field in the annual staff football tournament in memory of Tom Bell. The organisers were kind enough to welcome players from the local refugee community to take part in the tournament for a second year.

An intended outcome for the Action for refugee group is provide practical support to refugees, asylum seekers and those agencies working with them. Football provides an enjoyable and practicable vehicle to do this.

Staff from Edge Hill played in the tournament team. In addition trainees and staff have played matches organised by Dr Jack Sugden from the Faculty of Arts and Science. Jack has extensively researched the ability of sport to bring groups together. 

The Department of Education and Communities (within the Faculty of Education) has within its vision identified the importance of ‘ valuing and engaging with all our diverse communities’. Primary trainee teachers have taken part in Refugee Welcome days that include football as an important aspect.

If you are interested in getting involved with football and the wider community please contact

Dr Jack Sugden (sugdenj@edgehill.ac.uk)

Martin Ford (fordm@edgehill.ac.uk)

 

Event: Dr Julia Hope – Children’s Literature About Refugees 14th May

‘Children’s Literature About Refugees: A Catalyst in the Classroom’

DR JULIA HOPE, GOLDSMITHS COLLEGE, UNIVERSITY OF LONDON

Monday 14th May 2018 at 1.00pm, Room E1

This seminar welcomes Julia Hope, author of, ‘Children’s Literature About Refugees: A Catalyst in the Classroom’.  This book addresses one of our most pressing global issues – often called “the migrant crisis” – in a form accessible to younger children.

For child refugees to feel that their experiences are validated, and for others to understand their situation, engaging with the growing field of children’s texts on the subject is crucial.  Teachers also need to be encouraged to find ways in to tackle such challenging topics, with fiction providing the perfect catalyst.

In exploring the use of Mary Hoffman’s The Colour of Home and Beverley Naidoo’s The Other Side of Truth in the classroom, this book is indispensable for educators in the younger age range, and for researchers who are interested in controversial children’s literature.

Organised by the Faculty of Education and sponsored by I4P, this event will take place in the Faculty of Education, room E1.

More Information and Registration

Syrian Mothers’ Day Event in Liverpool 25 March 2018

Written by Mayya Al Safadi Diab.

With the help of Refugee Action, an event was organised by members of the Syrian refugee community for Syrian ladies and children in Liverpool on the 25th of March 2018. Thanks to the active ladies and in co-ordination with Refugee Action, the event was a great success, it involved traditional Syrian food that was cooked by the participant ladies themselves.

It was so lovely to see the pride each lady has represented her dish with, as in Syrian culture expressing love and dedication get represented by the Syrian food that takes a long time to be made most of the times.
Some ladies shared with hand made products and presented one of their creations to the winner of one of the competitions, which was great joy to the ladies, there were some games and presents as well to give to the winners with one of the Syrian ladies doing Henna for the young children and the women which was received with great joy.
Everything was free as thanks to refugee action support the hire of the hall was covered by them which made it more enjoyable to all ladies.
Some ladies travelled from Huyton to attend the event and they felt that it made them feel much better as lots of them were worried about families and relatives in Syria but being surrounded by their friends made the nostalgia a bit easier to manage. The kids were running and laughing, as the language barrier still a big part of these womens lives it made them relax and enjoy the event by being able to express themselves in their mother tongue with people around them. The event was a success by all measures.