Growing up in Afghanistan: Exhibition is open

Guy Smallman and Clare Woolhouse in Hale Hall.

The Growing up in Afghanistan exhibition is now open.  Guy Smallman visited the university to set up his photographs in Hale Hall. On Thursday 4th October 12-1pm there will be an opportunity to hear Guy discuss his work and answer questions in a short talk.

Please contact educationresearch@edgehill.ac.uk to reserve your place.

GROWING UP IN AFGHANISTAN Photography Exhibition @EHU

HALE HALL Edge Hill University
Monday 24th September —Thursday 4th October 2018

This is a ten day exhibition of the work of freelance photographer Mr Guy Smallman.   The exhibition will take up residency in Hale Hall for 10 days and involve a display of selected  photographs from Mr Smallman’s time in Afghanistan.

Visitors are welcome to drop in to view it at any time.

Mr Smallman will then join us at Edge Hill on Thursday 4th October 12-1pm to discuss his work and answer questions.

Guy Smallman is a self taught, London based photojournalist. He has worked all over the world in many different countries and environments specializing in social issues like human rights and poverty.

Since 2008 his main focus has been Afghanistan. His work from that country has appeared in many publications including most UK newspapers, FT Weekend magazine, Channel 4 news and the BBC to name but a few. He was also interviewed for John Pilger’s documentary film ‘The War You Don’t See’ after he became the only foreign journalist to reach the scene of the Granai massacre in Taliban controlled Farah province.

During his time in Afghanistan he has built a long term relationship with the internally displaced people living in terrible conditions in camps around Kabul. His exhibition features their children, many of whom were born in the camps.

For more information go to: http://guysmallman.com/

Please contact educationresearch@edgehill.ac.uk for further information and to register for the event on the 4th October.

Imagining community through sport at Edge Hill University

Dr Jack Sugden

In 1983 Benedict Anderson wrote ‘Imagined Communities’, a book that pointed out, among other things, that the communities, towns, cities and especially nations in which we live are not actually real. Although they might feel real to us, part of our lives, our identities, have you ever actually seen an England? Touched a Manchester? The point I make here, in an admittedly abstract way, is that we dwell in a world in which we are divided by many categories and identity hooks that are essentially made up.

The United Kingdom only exists because we all agree it does, just as we agree to follow, uphold and even celebrate its laws and culture. If we were to wake tomorrow having forgotten the UK, it might be a nightmare in terms of law and order, but we may also feel free, albeit isolated and alone. As though these categories and labels dive us they also unite us, giving us commonalities that we share, and which make us feel safe, like we belong. It is this exact feeling of collective national consciousness that captivates the nation during a royal wedding, at times of national crisis, or during the football world cup, the last two being much the same.

Football for Peace in Jerusalem, Jewish and Arab kids pre-game

 In terms of sport, from growing up in Belfast during the “troubles” I was witness to bitter and divisive nature of sport, but also, fleetingly, its capacity to cross the sectarian divide through a football team made up of both Protestants and Catholics called ‘Belfast United F.C.’ Continue reading

Where it all Began – A Stand and Be Counted Production

Imagine if everyone was ordered to return to their place of birth.

The UK’s first Theatre Company of Sanctuary, Stand and Be Counted present a wild and vivid vision of the future, combining storytelling, movement and live music.

Coming to Liverpool at the Unity Theatre, Liverpool 9th October.

Tickets £10.50 (£8.50 concessions)
Click here for a trailer and further details