Tag Archives: Sikhism

Dharma in Manchester

We were welcomed at the Jain Samaj Manchester by Suresh Mehta, the Chair of Trustees at the temple. They are just building a large new annexe which has cost £1M. The centre was opened 18 years ago by Gerald Kaufman MP

Suresh showed us a picture of the huge temple complex at Palitana.  Jains have 24 tirthinkaras in each time cycle, who have each reached nirvana. The first reached nirvana there 

We moved into the temple room and rang the bell, as saw the statues of the three tirthinkaras that they have there: Mahavir , the 24th tirthanka 599 BC – 527 BC, Parshvanat  the 23rd, born 877BC and Shantinath the 16th Tirthinkara.

Suresh spoke to us about the temple, the life of Mahavir and Jainism. He pointed out that he was talking about Mahavir’s version of Jainism as that is written down. Both Mahavir and Buddha came from Bihar and lived at more or less the same time, teaching very similar things.  They walked everywhere, and many Jain priests and devotees will do the same today.  140 people took tiksha in 2016. They give up everything and live without possessions in the Ashram. 

He explained that Jainism is built on three pillars:

  • Ahimsa – non violence but taken to the extreme meaning not even thinking bad thoughts and including being able to forgive.
  • Aparigrah – trying to live at a level of comfort, but not of excess. This leads to Jains being very generous.
  • Anekantvad – there is no absolute truth, everyone is (potentially) right 

Jainism follows a lunar calendar but add an extra month every fourth year.   We are in the fifth of six segments of the current time cycle. During this period things will get worse. Suresh talked to us about how Jain beliefs and practices influenced the Hindu Mohatma Gandhi.  Mahavir gave 5 rules for lay people to live by: ahimsa, truthfulness, not stealing, none aquisitionness, control over sexual desires.  

Suresh talked a little bit about the Jain Community- they try to help the local community, and are open and pluralistic in their outlook. They started holding meetings in a hired school hall.  Now they have 125 families. During the recent Paryushan celebrations ( a period of personal reflection), four people fasted for 8 days, no food and drinking only water during daylight. Suresh came from Kenya, where he lived next to the temple until he was 12. 

On a Sunday evening, before a shared dinner, Gujarati hymns are sung. In July he flag on top of the shrine is changed in a special ceremony.  Diwali is celebrated , as well as a Christmas party!  The temple is like one you would have in a house, so this doesn’t need a priest to wash the idols each day and carry out other duties.  On Tuesdays and Thursdays the temple is open and people can come and pray in a personal way.

We then moved on to the Sri Guru Gobind Singh Gurdwara where we were met by Sukhbir Singh.

Having removed our shoes, covered our heads and washed our hands we went into the Diwan Hall. Sukhbir demonstrated how he would enter the prayer hall. 

He gave us a quick overview of the history of Guru Nani Dev Ji and the founding of Sikhism, leading on to key beliefs and practices, including the five virtues, the Gurus and the Harminder Sahib. He talked about what happens at the gurdwara, both religious and cultural/community practices.

He explained that there are three pillars of Sikhism: 

  • Nama Jappo, praying to God.
  • Vand Chako, share everything you have
  • Kirat Karo, get what you can honestly through hard work.

A family who had just had a baby arrived straight from the hospital and we were able to listen as the granthi read a prayer from the Guru Granth Sahib. The first letter of the reading gave the family the start of the name, and they chose the name Ishtar. The granthi then prayed, for the baby and the family, including the blessing “bole so nihal”, “sat sari Amal” and we were blessed as the father offered us chocolates to show their thanks.

We finished off in the Langar Hall where we were served some delicious vegetarian pilau.

RE PGCE: Bradford Interfaith Visit 27.6.18

As part of their pre-NQT enrichment week, RE PGCE trainees visited Bradford as part of an interfaith visit to a number of places of worship.

The day began with a visit to the Gurdwara Singh Sabha where trainees were given a tour of the worship hall and able to see the rituals and practices associated with the Sikh Holy Book, the Guru Granth Sahib. Trainees enjoyed asking questions and experiencing some of the sounds of Sikh worship.

Next it was onto the Shree Laxmi Narayan Hindu Temple where trainees were able to observe the daily Aarti worship and meet with Seema, who discussed her experiences and beliefs as a Hindu. Ready for a rest, we thoroughly enjoyed our vegetarian lunch!

Before making our way back to Ormskirk, we ended the day with an insight into Reform Judaism at the Bradford Reform Synagogue, learning about the history of the Jewish community in Bradford and some of the differences between reform and orthodox practice.

A wonderful (very hot!) day and a lovely end to the PGCE course.

Dharma Day

Our latest cohort of Year 3 Undergraduates spent a day in Manchester as part of their Sikhism and Jainism Module.

File 23-11-2016, 17 12 30

At the Jain Samaj Manchester, our host Suresh explained about the beliefs, history and practices of the faith, and allowed us to explore their fantastic temple, handmade in Indian Marble.

File 23-11-2016, 17 12 30

We then journeyed across the City to the Guru Harkrishan Sahib Gurdwara. As it was Guru Nanak’s Birthday it was a very busy Temple.  We were treated to a fantastic langar, before entering the diwan hall where the female granthi was singing beautifully.

Our host CJ talked us through the basics of Sikhism, but really the best part was being able to experience the community worshipping at first hand. CJ accompanied us on the accordian and help us to joyfully recite the name of Waheguru!  Happ Birthday Guru Nanak Ji!

 

Looking to the East (Manchester!)

Undergraduate Third year students are currently learning about two Dharmic religions: Jainism and Sikhism.  As part of this we visited two temples in Manchester, the Jain Samaj and the Sikh Gurdwara.

17.11.15 © www.philtragen.com JOB REFERENCE - Religious Knowledge Field Trip - Jainism Temple, Longsight PO P165688

The first visit of the day was to the Jain temple.  Housed in converted building the main room is a sports hall, which is used for a variety of activities. Next to this is the actual Temple itself – sculpted from white Indian granite it features statues of Mahavira and two of the other tirthinkaras.  It really was a beautiful sight.

Suresh spoke to us about the history, beliefs and ethics of the Jains, and how the community in Manchester practise their faith in the 21st Century.

In the afternoon we went to the Gurdwara to hear about the Sikh faith.  After washing our hands and covering our heads we went into the Diwan Hall.  Here, Reeti talked about the background to the religion and then we heard a portion of the Guru Granth Sahib Ji read. We also got to see the Guru’s bedroom.

Finally, the highlight was to go into the Langar Hall and sample some of the wonderful food that they had prepared for us.

17.11.15 © www.philtragen.com JOB REFERENCE - Religious Knowledge Field Trip - Gurdwara, Manchester PO P165688

Thanks to Phil Tragen for the photos!

Two Temples in One Day

Part of our Year 3 undergraduate course is a module looking at two of the less popular Dharmic religions, Sikhism and Jainism.  as part of this we spent a day with the two communities in Manchester.

Our first visit was to the Jain Samaj Temple.  Here we were able to see the community hall with its most impressive shrine.  Dominating the shrine was a beautiful rupa of Mahavira and the first and 23rd tirthinkaras, Rsabha and Parsanatha.

Our  guide, Suresh Mehta spoke at great length, explaining Jain beliefs and practices, including ahimsa, the three paths and the four destinations.

We then continued across Manchester to meet our old friends at the Guru Harkrishan Sahib Gurdwara.

Our guide, Gurvinder Singh, expained the central beliefs of Sikhism and read from the Guru Granth Sahib – a wonderful experience.  We then had a little tour of the gurdwara, seeing the Guru’s bedroom, before finishing by eating some lovely langar in the langar hall.

Discovering the insider point of view

 

RE PGCE Student Claire Bartlett writes:

On 25.9.14 we had the pleasure to visit two key places of worship in Bradford, the Shree Lakshmi Mandir and Guru Gobind Singh Gurdwara.

See Google story of our Bradford trip here:

From this trip we hoped to improve our understanding of these two religions; from an insider point of view and appreciate the methods of worship and practice within these traditions. This was a great opportunity for everyone to deepen their subject knowledge, in preparation for our new roles in school.

KJKJ÷Á

Bradford Mandir

We arrived at the temple eager to experience Hindu worship first hand, we were politely asked to partake in the cleansing rituals that everyone (even the Queen!) would complete before entering a Hindu temple. After completing the absolution process; of removing our shoes and washing our hands, we were taken into the main room of worship. The main temple really was a beautiful sight, a long row of colourful deities surround by a pristine white structure in the style of a mandir.

Our host Seema explained her work in the community, highlighting the importance of how to educate young learners about Hinduism without causing confusion. After explanations of the various beautiful deities within the temple, we had the option to ask our own questions and experience the temple further. It was the first day of the festival of Diwali during our visit. This meant we got to experience families coming to place offering to the deities to mark the beginning of the festival.

KJKJ÷Á

Guru Gobind Singh Gurdwara

The next stop of the day was the Guru Gobind Singh Gurdwara, here we were greeted by Narrinder with refreshments and enjoyed these whilst learning about the langar room and the importance of this room in a Gurdwara. This is a key Sikh practice and anyone visiting a Gurdwara would be greeted by free food or drink upon entering the temple, the refreshments offered are donated by the community. This is because of the Sikh belief in helping everyone (Sewa).

After our introductions and extra biscuits we were led upstairs to the main room of worship. Here, we sat and observed Narrinder  recite the  hymns around opening the sacred text and learnt about the process of laying the text to rest at dawn and waking the text from its bedroom, at the far corner of the room. After asking questions about how they would carry out different types of ceremonies such as weddings and funerals we moved into a separate room and talk about Sikhism away from the Gurdwara.

Gurdwara 2

Narrinder gave us a talk through the 5 K’s of Sikhism, allowing for you to experience these objects first hand whilst learning about the spiritual meaning from an insider view. At the end of our visit Narrinder was kind enough to play the sitar for us ending our Sikh experience nicely with an opportunity to appreciate the music of the Sikh faith which is so central to their worship.

After our lunch in a room of the Interfaith Centre in Bradford, we popped into Bombay Stores, UK’s largest Asian department store. Here we got to explore both ladies and gentlemen’s traditional dress, staring longingly at the large selection of jewelry and pick up some little bits and pieces that we could incorporate into our teaching. This was a great end to an enjoyable trip.

 

 

Raga and Puja in Bradford

Our subject knowledge trip to places of worship in Bradford is now becoming an annual feature of the RE PGCE giving trainees an invaluable insight into the dharmic traditions within our communities through experiential learning. This year was no exception and we were warmly welcomed by our colleagues in the Hindu and the Sikh communities.

KJKJ÷Á

Our first visit took place at the imposing and impressive Shree Laxmi Narayan Mandir, visible from Leeds road by its distinctive Om symbol. Our faith tutor Seema welcomed us with the traditional Hindu Namaste greeting. Seema talked about the Hindu beliefs by sharing with us what Hindu dharma meant to her and we were able to explore the symbolism of the murtis through discussion. There were also rich opportunities to observe puja taking place and to meet the Brahmins based at the Mandir. Seema concluded the session with the sweet offerings of prashad.

20130927_104559

 

After a visit to Bombay stores to buy artefacts and resources, lunch at the interfaith centre, we moved on to the Gurdwara Singh Sabha where we were greeted by our faith tutor, Narrinder. We explored the religious significance of the five ‘K’s through Narrinder’s exposition of what living as a Khalsa Sikh meant for him.

KJKJ÷Á

We continued our enquiry into the significance of the Gurdwara by exploring the prayer hall and the central feature, the living Guru, the Guru Granth Sahib with a beautiful display of the symbolism of Sikhism, the kirpan, and the khanda. Narrinder created a beautiful meditative atmosphere and treated us to prayerful ragas, playing his electronic sitar. Trainees gained a rich ethnographic experience and came away with a deeper understanding of Sikh dharma. Hospitality was, as always perfect and we were treated to biscuits and a drink before we left for the M62 and back to Edge Hill.

As always, trainee comments speak for themselves about the impact of the experience:

Danielle said:

“I really enjoyed this trip. I thought the visit to the Hindu Mandir was excellent and the talk was fascinating. The Gurdwara was equally excellent, providing us with some rare opportunities to delve into our curiosities and queries. I thought our guide was very friendly and informative, most certainly would like to visit again. The chance to shop in Bombay stores was another highlight of the trip. We could identify various symbolic artefacts and buy them, an excellent resource to use in potential lessons. Overall, I really enjoyed it and would love to return!”

Mike said:

“The trip to Bradford was superb. We got to visit a Hindu Mandir, a Sikh Gurdwara, and Bombay stores – were we all got to buy religious artefacts to use in school! It was great to experience different religions and cultures, and visit their different places of worship.  The experience enhanced my knowledge of different religions and I have used many pictures from the day in lessons since, which the pupils have really enjoyed!”

Enjoy the video and thanks again to Rob Duffy for his excellent pictures!

http://youtu.be/cdFYellvbYQ

 

 

 

 

 

Sikh-ing Understanding

Year 3 RE Undergraduates visited the Gurdwara Sri Harkishan Sahib Ji in Manchester to hear about Sikh beliefs and history and experience Langar.  On a cold morning we entered the gurdwara, removed our shoes and covered our heads.  ‘Abs’ a young member of the congregation gave us a talk outlining many elements of Sikhism and answered many questions that the students found helpful in their developing knowledge of the faith – and in answering their assessment.

We were then treated to a reading from the Guru Granth Sahib Ji and shown how the Guru is treated with respect.  The final treat was the Langar, a potato dish and a lentil dish with bread and a drink.