“Speaker’s Corner” in Jerusalem during the Second Temple Era

Today, as part of the new “Abrahamic Traditions” module, the first year students from both Secondary Religious Education + QTS and Education and Religion programmes participated in a roleplaying game reenacting different major religious groups that were current during the Second Temple period (roughly around 0 C.E.).

The students were stunningly dressed in makeshift costumes and props from the RE storage cabinets while delivering short fiery speeches summarising the teachings of Pharisees, Zealots, Gnostics and Messianic Jews, against the Powerpoint backdrop of the old Western wall of the temple. The speakers did splendidly in spite of the presence of a strange heckler.

“Roman authorities and Jewish city elders are said to have been interested in the outcome of these discussions, and rumours have it that there might be arrest warrants for some of the speakers!”

A Pharisee calling for adherence to the Torah and criticising the hypocrisy of the Temple priesthood.

“Zealots” calling for militant rebellion against the Romans.

Mysterious Gnostics propounding radically unusual interpretations of the Torah and the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.
Messianic Jews cheerfully bringing good news of an “Apocalypse” and the coming of a Messiah
A bemused heckler. Has one of the speaker groups convinced him to join their cause?

Visit to Tübingen

This summer I spent around ten days as a visiting lecturer at Centre for Islamic Theology the University of Tübingen, located on the edge of the beautiful and mysterious Black Forest in the German state of Baden-Württemberg. The University of Tübingen, now also known as Eberhard Karls University, was founded in 1477, and has a long-standing history in the fields of theology and philosophy.

I delivered a series of lectures on classical Islamic philosophy, beginning with the definition of “wisdom” (sophia in Greek, hikma in Arabic), then exploring different key foundational philosophers up to the Grand Master of Islamic Philosopher Ibn Sina, known in the Latin West as Avicenna.

As part of the visit, I met local scholars and visited a number of historical locations around the city, including the Stiftskirche (the university church and one of the earliest to convert to Protestantism) and the Bebenhausen monastery on the outskirts of the city.It was exciting to walk around the streets that were once frequented by likes of Lessing, Holderlin, Hegel, Karl Barth, and Rudolf Bultmann! On the final day, I was able to attend a stunning performance by the university’s Philharmonic orchestra of Tchaikovsky’s Liturgy of St. John Crysostom and Mozart’s Coronation Mass. Still, it was chilling to learn from the signs outside that the concert hall used to be a gathering place for Nazi officers during the Second World War, and the city’s once thriving Jewish community no longer exist.

I would like to thank the assistant director of the centre, Professor Lejla Demiri, for inviting me, as well as all of those who made me feel very welcome as well intellectually/spiritually energised from the visit.

– Harith Ramli, Senior Lecturer in Theology and World Religions

View of the Stiftskirche or St. George’s Collegiate Church, one of the first in the region to convert to Protestantism during the Reformation. Important rulers of the city are buried within.
At the entrance to the Bebenhausen monastery outside the city
The northern corner of the Bebenhausen monastery cloister where the monks would gather to read.
The pulpit in the monastery chapel, built after the Reformation.
View of the Neckar river that runs through the medieval city centre.
The entrance to a 16th century townhouse.

‘Relationships for Learning’

To support the Reflective Professional Practice lecture, RE PGCE trainees were able to benefit from the expertise of Dr Chris Greenough who, prior to joining Edge Hill,  was  SLT lead for behaviour, pastoral and ITT in his previous role. He was able to share his own experiences about the importance of ‘relationships for learning’ and the role teachers’ play in ‘setting the weather’ in their classroom.

 

PGCE RE: Pop Culture & the media in RE

PGCE trainees excelled at the opportunity to explore the links between pop culture in the media and RE, creating strategy posters which showed how contemporary films, songs and TV shows can be used in the classroom to engage pupils and deliver high quality RE. They created a whole range of resources and lessons which  included; Groundhog Day (Buddhist Samsara), Futurama (attitudes towards homosexuality), Million Dollar Baby (Euthanasia), Friday night dinner (Reform Judaism), The Terminator (Christian Premillenialism) and Stormzy’s Blinded by your grace (Holy Spirit). They then developed their critical evaluation skills and give formative feedback on those strategies they liked, would change or would steal.