A Fond Farewell

Well folks, this is my last post to y’all out there in applicant land. It has been an absolute pleasure to share my experiences of Edge Hill with you. I hope you’ve enjoyed them, learned from them and, ultimately, made the right decision for you on your education.

I’m hoping to go and start my MA course in Creative Writing this September. Where do I want to study? Edge Hill of course! Yep it’s been a wonderful three years already, and there should be another two to follow for me. I’m sure if you do decide to study here you’ll have just as good, if not better, experience and I wish you all the best with your studies.

Goodbye, so long and I hope to see you around Edge Hill’s campus soon. Peace out.

Memories Are Made Of This – Part 6

So here it is, part six of my hugely successful trip down Memory Lane and into English and Creative Writing at Edge Hill University Avenue (quite a long street sign isn’t it?). Today I’m writing about something that could be fairly easily overlooked in the creative writing spectrum. It ain’t poetry, scriptwriting or fiction, and what else is there I hear you wonder? Life writing is the answer to that query. It formed part of the first year of my course at Edge Hill, and I only wish I could have done more of it!

One branch of life writing is travel writing (hence the picture, it wasn’t just eye candy). It’s really inspirational when you think that this course could get you a jet-set job. If you are a creative writer and you’ve been abroad, chances are you already keep journals and whatnot, but studying this at Edge Hill has really given a good perspective on what’s out there for you and your passion.

Even more interesting for me was the look at columnists, such as Charlie Brooker, and the techniques they use to write articles. Humour is a massive part of it, hence why I enjoyed this part of the course so much, but also touches of surreality, all to convey (and, yes, over-emphasise) an opinion. However outrageous! After all, isn’t that one of the greatest things about writing? Right and wrong are just shades to paint with as opposed to moral absolutes.

That leads me on to autobiographies, biographies and memoirs. The reading list for this part of the course is fantastic, I really got to sink my teeth into a great book called And When Did You Last See Your Father by Blake Morrison. The debate about truth really comes alive here, and you’d be surprised how you might write your own life story after looking and analysing other people’s.

To sum up, the structure of the course has been brilliant at Edge Hill. They fitted a lot of high quality, stimulating and thought-provoking lessons into a reasonably small module, and although I miss it, I’ll never forget it!

Memories Are Made Of This – Part 5

If anyone read my last post, talking about the start of the Premier League season and A-Level results day, I sure hope you had much better results than Liverpool against West Brom! Feel free to comment, let me know how well you did 🙂

Anyways, on with the show! Today I’ll be looking into one of the most intrinsically interesting bits of the English and Creative Writing course at Edge Hill. The ‘Creative Writing’ part is self-explanatory, but the ‘English’ bit is made up of Literature (already covered in one of my earlier posts) and Language, which is today’s feast for the mind. The diagram, which I hope you’re curious about, shows the parts of human head that are used to produce speech.

Overall, the Language part of the degree is as well structured as the Eiffel Tower. When you start off at the bottom, the focus is fairly wide. In the first year I was looking at an introduction to the history of the English language one semester and linguistics the next. The second year saw a development of the history side of things, but introduces modules that you are free to choose yourself (I chose an introduction to sociolinguistics, combining my interest in linguistics with social theory. Hard work, yeah, but it really brought home that linguistics is an impressive science that we can see at work in everyday life). The third year had even more freedom as there were no compulsory modules so, according to my Eiffel Tower analogy, you can taper it to whatever end you want. My only regret is that i couldn’t do everything!

The whole point of my ‘memories’ series of blogs is to look back at best bits. So then, what exactly are the best bits now that I’ve outlined the overall goodness of the course? It’s another genuinely tough question… Could it be the discovery of how changeable our linguistic behaviour is in different social situations (for example, do you speak to your best friends in the same way as you would to your grandparents? Do you swear more in some circles of interaction than others? Well, you’ll find out so much about things like this that you probably hadn’t even thought of before)? Could it be the module called ‘Beyond English’ that shows how English has influenced the rest of the world, and how different languages can be from each other on every level?

You know what, I know it’s a cop-out but I can’t pick out one moment over another. There really is something for everyone; historians, scientists, sociologists and even more can find modules that will interest them, expand their knowledge and improve their employability when they graduate. I think the best bit has been the whole experience, especially working with the most passionate tutors you could ever wish for (including someone who had a big part to play in a recent popular film francise. If you ever have the pleasure of a class with Prof. Anthony Grant, ask him to tell you more, though you may have to wait until the third year before he spills the beans!).

Though it may sound odd, I hope that after you come to Edge Hill, and have a fantastic experience like I have, you have as much trouble picking out a favourite moment. The thing is, when the university is so brilliant overall it is a positive – rather than a negative – that it’s difficult to pick a stand-alone moment. I hope you’re looking forward to having an awesome three years here soon.

I’ve Just Noticed

The next open event at Edge Hill is on the same day that the new season of the Premier League kicks off! Yes, it’s on the 18th of this month, but please don’t let that put you off. In fact, the event takes place between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., so you’ll still be able to watch Liverpool play West Brom afterwards. You can find out more about the open event here http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/events/2012/08/18/open-event, and I recommend you come along to get a taster of the great campus and also ask some questions about your course. You can find out more about Liverpool FC on their website (I’m sure it’s already in your favourites, so I won’t give you a link 😛 ).

Speaking of getting to know your courses, my next post will be a look at more best bits from English and Creative Writing, so don’t miss that!

Impending Va-Va-Voom

It has certainly been a tense time across Britain and the rest of the world lately, with sports fans eagerly checking the latest results from the Olympic Games. A new kind of eagerness for results is creeping up on us though, as it is now less than a fortnight until A-Level results come out, and many young folks find out whether they have enough UCAS points to get into their chosen universities.

When I was choosing where to go, I did let UCAS points have a certain say in it. I’m sure teachers at most schools will have recommended confirming the university you most want to go to and a ‘safety choice’ with a lower UCAS point requirement, just in case you don’t get the grades you’re hoping for. I was really lucky with Edge Hill in the sense that its requirements for entry onto the English and Creative Writing course were really very modest, considering the level of further education they were offering. The course itself is full of tutors all contributing to their field enthusiastically (rather than just reading someone else’s book) and always going the extra mile for any student who needs help in any way, so the low point-requirement was a dream come true.

Results day was amazing for me. I managed to do a little better than I needed to get onto the course and was therefore in the position to go to either Edge Hill or my second choice. I’m not going to lie, my second choice (at the time) had one advantage in the form of a bursary that I would have been eligible for but, to be honest, Edge Hill was so much better that I was actually happy to say no to a few beer tokens (yes, I actually did, it’s here in writing now!) for a university that has really given me a priceless and unforgettable experience that has seen me enjoy a fantastic course with great tutors, make awesome friends and also live an independent life with a great mix of studying and partying.

Well, it’s about time for me to wrap this up. I know results aren’t out for a little while yet, but my advice is not to worry about them (though it’s easier said than done, I know!). What’s done is done, and stressing over them won’t change anything. I hope you’ve enjoyed your respective courses though, and please take it from me that even better times are just around the corner at Edge Hill. On a note about bursaries and scholarships, here’s a link to the Edge Hill finance page, which has links to bursaries, scholarships, fees etc: http://www.edgehill.ac.uk/undergraduate/fees. Before you come here, do check and see if you are able to get any extra financial support. Some support is available for certain disabilities, but also for special achievements in certain fields, so you owe it to yourself!

Peace out.