Have you used the Inclusive Digital Practices Toolkit?

Inclusive Digital Practice ToolkitLearning Services have created the toolkit to support academic staff in the creation of accessible Digital Content.

The toolkit includes quick tips, a checklist, user guides and some video case studies that showcase how teaching staff are using Digital Technology to support their students.

We are submitting the toolkit for the Blackboard Catalyst Award for Inclusive Education and are looking for some endorsements from staff who have used the toolkit to enhance their teaching practices.

Please get in touch, to let us know if the toolkit has helped.

email: John Haycock (haycockj@edgehill.ac.uk)

68 Things to Help You Find and Use TV and Radio Broadcasts

I don’t know if any of you have wanted to share broadcast materials with students. When I started working at Edge Hill the only legal way to do this was to get in touch with Jim in Learning Services, who would record the programme and put it on a VHS tape for you to show in class.

Box of Broadcasts Guide Page

This system has now developed into a much more advanced online service called Box of Broadcasts, which allows you to link to programmes from, and embed them directly in, Learning Edge.

Instead of having to find out about the programme beforehand and ask someone to record it, the main channels are now recorded automatically and kept indefinitely. You can use the website to request programmes on other free to air channels up to 30 days after they air.

Programme Embedded in Learning Edge

Once you find a programme that you want to share, you can share it using what is called a WAYFless link that takes students directly to the EHU login screen, or you can embed the video in Blackboard. If only part of the programme is relevant you can create a clip and share that, and you can add programmes and clips to playlists and share those.

To help you get started we’ve put together a document with (at the time of writing) 68 playlists, tips, links to articles and guides, etc.


beaumont_smaller

Peter Beaumont
Learning Technology Development Officer

Learning Technology Highlights: October 2016

Lynda.com Logo
All Edge Hill University staff now have access to the Lynda.com video training library. You can use it to help you develop your skills in areas as diverse as music, social media marketing, animation and Office 2013.

This resource would cost you over £300 per year if you paid yourself, so it is well worth a look. We have a guide to logging into Lynda.com, should you need help.

If you think that it would be a useful resource to use with your students, get in touch with us at ltdsupport@edgehill.ac.uk. We have limited student accounts, and need to keep track of use, but we can provide you with guides and support as you and your students learn to use the resource, and to help you integrate it with Blackboard.

Plickers logo
We saw the first use of the Plickers sets that we laminated this month; Sarah Wright used them with a group of students.

Plickers are another option when you are choosing student voting systems. Students respond to a multiple choice question by holding up a code card, and they can rotate the card to select their response. The lecturer/facilitator uses an app on their phone to detect the responses.

You might want to use Plickers instead of online solutions like Kahoot:

  • where you do not want to expect all students to have a charged mobile device
  • when you do not want students to have their mobile devices switched on
  • in locations without a wireless network

If you want to know more or use Plickers with your students, get in touch with us at ltdsupport@edgehill.ac.uk.

Box of Broadcasts logo
Box of Broadcasts (BoB) has returned from its summer redevelopment, and as of October 31st you should find all the features that you are used to, including embed code for the videos so that you can embed them in Blackboard.

BoB makes it easy for staff and students to request the recording of programmes from the TV and Radio, to access and share those recordings, and to access millions of other recordings that have been made using the service.

Our Box of Broadcasts guide should help you get started, as will the BoB video tutorials.

Rubrics… So what are they anyway?

Recently in the Learning Technology Department we’ve been taking lots of calls and emails from staff wanting to use Rubrics in their teaching and learning but specifically, marking.

What are they?

Rubrics could also be called Grading or Marking Criteria.  I’m sure many of you are used to the grid system used to mark students work using ‘Scales’ (e.g. 1st, 2:1, 2nd etc… / Pass, Merit, Distinction etc…) and ‘Criteria’ (e.g. Knowledge, Presentation, Understanding, Content etc…)

If you translate your paper criterias into a rubric in Blackboard (or Turnitin) you can use them electronically to mark your students’ work quickly and efficiently.  There are of course some limitations (for instance you can’t annotate a rubric as some would on a paper copy) but once you learn to work with them and create your own departmental methods, in time it should become much quicker and easier.  The best bit is that it’s all saved alongside the submitted work so that students can always refer to it and staff can always cross check their marks or conduct second marking easily.

Rubric

Where do I set them up?

Rubrics are available in both Turnitin and with a number of Blackboard (Learning Edge) tools such as Blogs, Wikis, Discussion Forums and Assignments.

However! Turnitin only likes Turnitin Rubrics and Blackboard only likes Blackboard Rubrics.

If you create a rubric you can use it multiple times across different submissions, so for example; if you create a rubric in Turnitin you can use it across multiple Turnitin dropboxes.  The same goes for Blackboard tools.

You can also ‘share’ rubrics with others – so if you’ve created a rubric someone else can grab a copy from you to use in their own assignments (you export it, email it to them and they import it).

For details on how and where to find and set up Turnitin Rubrics check out the package created especially for just that: Turnitin Rubrics ePackageRubricsPackage

For Blackboard Rubrics check out the Blackboard help pages:
Blackboard Rubrics Guide

blackboardRubrics

So why should I use them?

Rubrics can speed up your marking and can also take away some of the extensive writing that you have to do when giving feedback.  If used well you should find that you write less ‘generic’ things and can focus more on specific student feedback.

Rubrics can also help with consistency – if all the module or programme tutors use the same rubric then students across that module or course will have more of the same, equal feedback so there will be less disparity.

Rubrics can be used alongside Quickmarks or comments and also general comments, audio feedback and the final overall mark.

We hope you find it useful and helpful to use rubrics in your practice.  Let us know if you have any comments about them or if you need any further support to roll them out.

LTD_Carol_Chatten

 

 

Carol Chatten
Learning Technology Development Officer

Record and Share TV and Radio Programmes Online with Box of Broadcasts

BoB Logo Box of Broadcasts (BoB) is an online service which makes it easy for you to legally record programmes from the TV and Radio, and to make them available to your students online.

Not only that, but you can access the recordings others have made, and students have access to record and share programmes themselves.

You can access BoB by going directly to the website at http://bobnational.net/, selecting ‘Log In’ and typing ‘Edge Hill University’ as the organisation name. You will then be prompted to type in your Edge Hill username and password.

Alternatively you can access the Edge Hill Library Catalogue and search in there for ‘Box of Broadcasts’.

We have put together a guide which covers how to record, create clips and playlists, embed videos in Blackboard, and get notifications of upcoming broadcasts on a topic.

 

beaumont_smaller

Peter Beaumont
Learning Technology Development Officer

Audacity: Create Professional Audio Narrations for all your Learning Resources

It’s usually around this time of the year when most of us free up some time to create or even review our learning resources for the new academic year. I know a lot of staff at Edge Hill are really starting to move away from standard PowerPoint based materials and producing some really engaging resources by embedding multimedia into materials developed on the following:

 

  • Microsoft PowerPoint
  • iSpring
  • Microsoft Office Mix
  • Campus Pack (Podcasts)

Maybe some of you are considering trying one of these technologies (though I hope everyone uses PowerPoint as standard). Let’s face it, all we need to do is take a look around our amazing campus and witness the wide adoption of mobile devices over the recent years. With the use of mobile learning in mind, we need to understand that today’s learners will not solely consume content through the PC/Mac desktop environment. At some point, we all have to break out of our usual practices and look for an effective alternative to create rich engaging and mobile friendly materials for our modules and programmes.

So for those who are looking to take that first small step maybe consider introducing audio narration tracks to your current PowerPoint files. Audio narration can be used across all of the technologies I mentioned previously. It’ll offer you the opportunity to embed audio narration tracks to your resources by recording directly into whatever platform you wish (PowerPoint, iSpring, Podcasts etc.). For this post, I’m focussing on a video (see below) which details a specific process developed by Josh Holnagel (Instructional Designer, Techsmith). This process demonstrates how you can edit and polish a pre-recorded audio file within Audacity (an open-source audio editor). Audacity can be found on all PCs on campus and is freely available to download here. http://audacityteam.org/download/

You may want to record your audio narration first with an USB microphone, your smartphone or even your tablet. Take the recorded file and load it straight into Audacity and give this tutorial a go. The workflow shown is a series of small techniques, tips that Josh has developed from his own experience.

PlayerFor those experienced users of Audacity, a detailed table of contents follows below so you can see what‘s covered in this video.

Table of Contents

0:00 Intro
0:50 How to change the Audacity project rate
1:15 How to split a stereo track to mono
1:30 How to find and copy white noise
2:15 How to make a new track
2:25 How to paste white noise end-to-end
3:30 How to use white noise throughout a track
5:22 How to paste white noise over existing audio
6:40 How to eliminate breaths and mouth clicks
8:53 How to quiet noises in between words
10:24 How to use the Amplify effect in Audacity
10:46 How to repeat an effect
11:27 How to adjust the volume of words or phrases
13:13 How to reduce or remove white noise
14:47 How to export audio from Audacity
15:10 Outro

Below are some great guides and links on some of the technologies you can insert audio narrations into. Why not have a glance at any that appeal to you, feel free to contact your faculty LTDO if you need to know more!

wordpresspenpic

Mark Wilcock
Learning Technology Development Officer

 

 

iSpring: Video Case Study 3 of 3

iSpring Early Adopters Project: Video Case Study 3

In the Learning Technology Development team we’ve recently completed the early adopters’ project in the use of iSpring. Following on from Sertip and Maggies previous videos, we would now like to introduce Carl Simmons from the Faculty of Education.

Carl shares his experience and advice from the iSpring Early Adopters project. He tells us how his department uses iSpring to transform their existing traditional external facing resources into a format that supports accessibility for students out on placement. Carl also describes how support from Learning Technologists can help you overcome any obstacles and enhance the students’ learning experience. Take a few moments to view our third and final video case study.

Carl Simmons Case Study 3click_to_open

 

 

 

 

 

iSpring Early Adopters Project: Video Case Studies 1 & 2

Sertip_Case_Studyclick_to_open

 

 

 

 

 

Case Study 2

click_to_open

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BestofTEL_SMALL

The video case studies powerfully illustrate the positive effect that technology can have.  Their words describe how the use of iSpring can offer huge benefits to the student learning experience. 

At Edge Hill we have built up a critical mass of good practice that can be accessed by staff who are thinking of incorporating these technologies into their courses. If you have been inspired and would like to learn more your Learning Technologist can help.

…and you have access to a wide range of user guides on eShare and beyond:

wordpresspenpic

Mark Wilcock
Learning Technology Development Officer

 

 

iSpring: Video Case Study 2 of 3

iSpring Early Adopters Project: Video Case Study 2

In the Learning Technology Development team we’ve recently completed the early adopters’ project in the use of iSpring. Following on from Sertip in last month’s case study, we would now like to introduce Maggie Webster from the Faculty of Education.

Maggie shares her experience in the iSpring Early Adopters project and tells us how she uses iSpring to transform her traditional resources into a format that supports formative assessment for online and blended delivery. Maggie also describes how support from Learning Technologists can help you overcome any obstacles and enhance the students’ learning experience.

Take a few moments to view our second video case study. Look out for the third and final video coming later this month.

Case Study 2

click_to_open

 

 

 

 

 

BestofTEL_SMALL

Maggie’s video illustrates powerfully the positive effect that technology can have.  Her words describe how the use of iSpring can offer huge benefits to the student learning experience. 

At Edge Hill we have built up a critical mass of good practice that can be accessed by staff who are thinking of incorporating these technologies into their courses. If you have been inspired and would like to learn more your Learning Technologist can help.

…and you have access to a wide range of user guides on eShare and beyond:

wordpresspenpic

Mark Wilcock
Learning Technology Development Officer

 

 

iSpring: Video Case Study 1 of 3

iSpring Early Adopters Project: Video Case Study 1

In the Learning Technology Development team we’ve recently completed the early adopters project in the use of iSpring. Over the coming weeks we’ll be sharing the knowledge and experience of three selected participants who have successfully embedded iSpring into their eLearning toolkit and produced some impressive learning materials for students.

This week we’re introducing our first video – featuring Sertip Zangana from the Faculty of Health & Social Care.  Sertip is a Senior Lecturer in Advanced Clinical Practice. He talks about his involvement in the project and his general practice, including the benefits his students’ experienced in the online environment, and the challenges involved.

Why not take a few moments to view the first of three video case studies. Look out for the next two videos coming in April.

Sertip_Case_Study click_to_open

 

 

 

 

 

BestofTEL_SMALL

Sertips’s video powerfully illustrates the positive effect that technology can have.  His words describe how the use of iSpring can offer huge benefits to the student learning experience. 

At Edge Hill we have built up a critical mass of good practice that can be accessed by staff who are thinking of incorporating these technologies into their courses. If you have been inspired and would like to learn more your Learning Technologist can help.

…and you have access to a wide range of user guides on eShare and beyond:

wordpresspenpic

Mark Wilcock
Learning Technology Development Officer

 

 

Using Classroom Voting Systems

Optivote HandsetsLearning Services have been supporting the use of the Optivote and TurningPoint classroom voting systems over the last eight years. Recently the sets have been moved from the Learning Technology Development offices in the LINC to the University Library.

This change means that the systems can now be booked via the Loaning Equipment page on the Learning Services Wiki and you will need to go to the Ground Floor helpdesk in the University Library at Ormskirk to collect and return the sets.

Please get in touch with us in Learning Technology Development if you need any help or guidance on the use of the systems. Our contact details and our voting system guides are available on eShare.

Finally, if you are interested in using these systems you might enjoy the recent post by Elaine Hughes about her experiences using Optivote, and I’ve recently put together a video looking at the use of Kahoot as an example of a system that allows the use of student mobile devices.