Technology Supported Learning – Advanced Grade Marking and Grade Centre use

Clinical Education, now housed within the Faculty of Health and Social Care, re-won a tender in March 2015 to deliver the Postgraduate Certificate in Workplace-Based Postgraduate Medical Education from September 2015.  With this came an overhaul of the way that the marking and grades were managed within Learning Edge and as a result a more streamlined, transparent and efficient way of working has been adopted.

Electronic marking had been used for some time but results were calculated on a feedback sheet and manually emailed back to the student.  This was excessive work that had the potential for error for the bank of Associate Tutors (ATs) that taught and marked on the course.

As of September 2016 Turnitin was used as the primary platform for submission and included formative and summative use of the tool – formative for students to check their originality report and summative for the staff marking the work.

GradeCentre

Intelligent use of the Grade Centre also followed.  Here is a summary of the tools and functions that were integrated into the process:

Smart Views;

Enables filtering of the Grade Centre so that each tutor only has to display their own students.  In the module, each tutor has approximately 15 students within a group and it is the ATs role to manage, track and mark these students.  The groups are called Learning Sets (LS) and there may be as many as 12 LS in a cohort!  Being able to filter this list of 180+ students is highly beneficial.

Creating Columns

Extra columns are created to track the completion of ‘Compulsory Discussion Activities’.  It’s a requirement that all students on the module complete 75-80% of the discussions to complete the course.  By putting a mark (usually a ‘Y’) in the cell for that student in the Grade Centre, a quick glance is all it takes to see which students aren’t engaging and who might need a ‘nudge’.  A column is also created for the students’ Learning Set number so that when viewing the Full Grade Centre you can see who may not have been allocated to their Learning Set Group – especially helpful as sometimes students can be quite late to enrol and may miss being placed in a Group.

Deleting the Total Column

The ‘Total Column’ is a default creation and Clinical Education doesn’t use it – so it has to go!  The Total Column can be removed once the ‘External Grade’ function is moved elsewhere – we move it to the ‘Weighted Total’:

Weighted Totals

The Weighted Total is thus made the External Grade.  The Weighted Total is set up so that the 2 assignments that students are required to submit are given a weighting coordinated with the Module Handbook (for example 50%-50% or 70%-30% etc).  This helps with calculating an overall grade average – especially if one assignment is good and the other not so good.  The only issue here is that if one assignment fails then the Weighted Total may still record a pass overall as the ‘other’ grade might pull the calculation up.  This involves checking that both assignments are at least a pass before assuming that the student has passed overall.

Grading Schemas

In Clinical Education we make use of the ‘Primary’ and ‘Secondary’ displays for results.  The Primary is the figure given to the assignment (out of 100%) the Secondary display converts this into a Postgraduate scale that will identify ‘Distinction’, ‘Merit’, ‘Pass’ and ‘Fail’.  The Grading Schema works this out across the columns its applied to in the Grade Centre.

Grading Colours

This makes quick glances easy! Colour coding the cells in the Grade Centre helps identify where there is a submission requiring marking, and where students have achieved a Distinction, Merit, Pass or Fail.  In conjunction with the Smart Views, tutors marking can be tracked easily by the Module Leader.  It can also produce a nice overview of what the students are achieving.

Tidying up

Finally, a bit of tidying up.  As the Grade Centre is quite busy then any unnecessary columns may as well be removed.  The only column that we remove is the ‘User ID’ which is in fact a duplicate of the Student ID although the ‘Availability’ and ‘Child Course’ columns could also be reasonably removed.

GradeMark in Turnitin has also helped streamline the marking process.  Using quick comments, general comments and particularly utilising Turnitin Rubrics tutors have found an ideal way to create and leave feedback for their students.  Using the Smart Views in the Grade Centre helps tutors to focus just on their own Learning Set of students.

So as can be seen a number of mechanisms can be used (you don’t have to use all of them by-the-way!) to help with the management of a module or course.

Learning Technology Development have created a number of e-packages and guides to help you incorporate the above tools into your own courses:

“GradeMark has been a really useful innovation on our programme.  I run a module where we have multiple associate tutors engaged in the first marking process.  It’s been really helpful for them from a quality assurance process point of view to be able to look at the rubrics as they are marking ensures a more rigorous and equitable application of the grading criteria.  It also, as module leader, helped me to quality assure the marking process because I can see how first markers have arrived at the grades that they have through the use of the rubric.

 It’s also been a useful development tool for the associate tutors themselves.  They’ve been able to look at the feedback added by other associate tutors and that helps them benchmark the quality and quantity of their own feedback against that of other markers on the module and also ensures a more consistent experience for students and its allowed me to evaluate and quality assure the marking process much more thoroughly than I would have been able to do previously.”

Helen McNeill, Module Leader CPD4706,
Programme Leader PGCert in Workplace-Based Postgraduate Medical Education.

LTD_Carol_Chatten

Carol Chatten
Learning Technology Development Officer

Technology Supported Learning – A Wright Rubric

Andrea Wright – FLM3023 (CW1)
Good Practice Award
This summer, for the first time, Film Studies moved over to marking using Turnitin, and we decided that we wanted to make that marking as useful to the students as possible by indicating how they were scoring in relation to the grade criteria of 0-100, how well they were meeting the LOs and also by preserving some personal feedback that we have always used and been praised for by external examiners.

After help from Martin and Carol [in the Learning Technology Development Team], it became clear that rubrics, in conjunction with quick marks and a personal comments would be the best way to achieve this. We removed the numerical scoring from the rubric and used our existing levels 4, 5 and 6 grade descriptors to create three generic rubrics that could be shared with all the module leaders. Each of the module leaders then added the specific LOs for each of their assignments to the rubric and attached it to modules. That way, all students in each level would score against a common criteria and also specific LOs for each module.

Quick Marks, Film Studies Set

     FLM3023_4FLM3023_5

In terms of the quick marks, while many of the general, provided ones are useful, there are also certain things that Film Studies regularly comments on – including italicising in film titles, making sure there is a reference for each film, adding names of actors, how to handle quotations and so on. I asked around the team and created a collaborative list from the feedback. I then created a new quick mark set and shared this with the team in addition to the rubric.

FLM3023_3   FLM3023_2

The overall result is that we have a good, standardised way of approaching marking across the programme and students can expect a consistent experience across the modules that they are studying. So far, student feedback from the third years has been overwhelmingly positive and a number have commented, in particular, that they have found the marking very clear and beneficial.

If you are interested in following in Andrea’s footsteps please get in touch with the Learning Technology Team in Learning Services and we can show you some other examples of what other departments are doing with rubrics and you can see if you would benefit from adopting a similar approach.

Click to view YouTube video playlist setting-up and using Turnitin Rubric

AWright

 

 

Andrea Wright
Senior Lecturer – Film Studies

 

LTD_Carol_Chatten

 

 

Carol Chatten
Learning Technology Development Officer – FAS

 

Martin Baxter

 

 

Martin Baxter
Learning Technology Development Officer – FAS

 

 

 

Rubrics… So what are they anyway?

Recently in the Learning Technology Department we’ve been taking lots of calls and emails from staff wanting to use Rubrics in their teaching and learning but specifically, marking.

What are they?

Rubrics could also be called Grading or Marking Criteria.  I’m sure many of you are used to the grid system used to mark students work using ‘Scales’ (e.g. 1st, 2:1, 2nd etc… / Pass, Merit, Distinction etc…) and ‘Criteria’ (e.g. Knowledge, Presentation, Understanding, Content etc…)

If you translate your paper criterias into a rubric in Blackboard (or Turnitin) you can use them electronically to mark your students’ work quickly and efficiently.  There are of course some limitations (for instance you can’t annotate a rubric as some would on a paper copy) but once you learn to work with them and create your own departmental methods, in time it should become much quicker and easier.  The best bit is that it’s all saved alongside the submitted work so that students can always refer to it and staff can always cross check their marks or conduct second marking easily.

Rubric

Where do I set them up?

Rubrics are available in both Turnitin and with a number of Blackboard (Learning Edge) tools such as Blogs, Wikis, Discussion Forums and Assignments.

However! Turnitin only likes Turnitin Rubrics and Blackboard only likes Blackboard Rubrics.

If you create a rubric you can use it multiple times across different submissions, so for example; if you create a rubric in Turnitin you can use it across multiple Turnitin dropboxes.  The same goes for Blackboard tools.

You can also ‘share’ rubrics with others – so if you’ve created a rubric someone else can grab a copy from you to use in their own assignments (you export it, email it to them and they import it).

For details on how and where to find and set up Turnitin Rubrics check out the package created especially for just that: Turnitin Rubrics ePackageRubricsPackage

For Blackboard Rubrics check out the Blackboard help pages:
Blackboard Rubrics Guide

blackboardRubrics

So why should I use them?

Rubrics can speed up your marking and can also take away some of the extensive writing that you have to do when giving feedback.  If used well you should find that you write less ‘generic’ things and can focus more on specific student feedback.

Rubrics can also help with consistency – if all the module or programme tutors use the same rubric then students across that module or course will have more of the same, equal feedback so there will be less disparity.

Rubrics can be used alongside Quickmarks or comments and also general comments, audio feedback and the final overall mark.

We hope you find it useful and helpful to use rubrics in your practice.  Let us know if you have any comments about them or if you need any further support to roll them out.

LTD_Carol_Chatten

 

 

Carol Chatten
Learning Technology Development Officer

Summer’s over… Let’s welcome the new term!

We wave goodbye to the long days, sunshine(?!) and quiet campus but instead we greet our new students and all the fun – and challenges – that the new term brings!

So what’s been happening lately in the world of learning technology? Well, possibly not much that you can actually see but plenty has been going on behind the scenes as well as enhancements to what was already there.

LEHomeYou may have firstly noticed that we’ve gone purple! Yes, in keeping with the Learning Services chosen corporate colour we have matched this in the Learning Edge look.  We think it looks rather smart – let us know what you think…

Momentum has picked up in our Faculty Resources areas in Learning Edge (you will see these as ‘Your FoE Resources‘, ‘Your FoHSC Resources‘ or ‘Your FAS Resources‘, with new ‘panels’ being created all the time to host useful information for students including job updates, events on campus and pinpointing handy learning resources.  Lots of departments have asked for their Twitter feeds to be added to the Learning Edge Homepage too.  If you want yours on there get in touch with LTD to find out how!

Possibly for the first in quite some time we didn’t apply a major update to Learning Edge.  We still carried out an update to the system to ensure it’s as robust and reliable as possible for this coming year.  The update fixed a number of ‘bugs’ and also streamlined some of the processes to hopefully make everything work faster.

Qwickly continues to be a popular tool for staff to ‘qwickly’ make their courses available.  Don’t forget to do this so your new students can see their modules or programme areas! You can find it at the bottom of your Course list on the Learning Edge Home page.

With any luck before Christmas we will welcome the new Learning Edge/Blackboard Mobile App for students.  This will bring an updated and improved experience to students who prefer to use their mobiles for their learning.  Watch this space for further information! We may also soon see a Blackboard Mobile App specifically for Instructors! Again watch this space for further information.  (If you are using the Learning Edge/Blackboard Assignment tool for submissions don’t forget you can download the ‘Grader‘ app to mark students’ work on your tablet) or for iPad users, you can get the Turnitin marking app.

The new BOS (Bristol Online Surveys) interface came in before summer and we hope that you’re enjoying using the additional functionality it came with, the easy to use face-lift and mobile friendliness!  If you aren’t currently using BOS – you might wish to take a closer look at what it can do for you here: BOS Help & Support.
Get in touch with LTD to get a free account to use for whatever you need it for – student surveys, evaluations, research, opinion gathering and much more!

Other little goodies…
eShare continues to grow in popularity for staff to host their teaching materials.  Every member of staff has an account using their staff login details to access it.
www.eshare.edgehill.ac.uk

ispringExampleiSpring for rapid e-learning content development using PowerPoint has taken off in a number of departments.  If you want to find out more contact LTD for some examples or find out if we’ve got a license we can allocate to you.  In addition to this we should hopefully be welcoming Office Mix too… again, watch this space!

In LTD we’ve got some really exciting projects already kicking off.  These include work around User Experience testing, Reading List integration with Learning Edge, Staff Knowledge Base plus much, much more (In the region of 40+ projects in fact!)
One project in particular will see the development and deployment of a TLA (Teaching Learning and Assessment) Tab that will join the others in Learning Edge.  We aim to include exciting and informative help, guidance and support in regards to all things Teaching and Learning.  We’ll be approaching as many departments as possible for their input so please share with us your ideas!

This is a really exciting year coming up and we are looking forward to working with as many of our wider colleagues as possible over the coming year.  Contact your Learning Technologist for all your Teaching and Learning with Technology needs (not just Learning Edge!) The earlier you get them involved with their skills and expertise the greater the satisfaction you will have when your ideas come to fruition!  Details of your Learning Technologist can be found by clicking here.

Have a fantastic 2015/16 academic year and keep in touch!

LTD_Carol_Chatten

 

 

Carol Chatten
Learning Technology Development Officer

 

Blackboard World Conference – Part 3

Washington DC – National Harbour Conference Centre, 20th-23rd July

Final day!
The conference has been interesting but in particular our colleagues from across the globe have been wonderful.  We’re still getting people coming up to us saying “your session was great” and “so cool what you guys are doing”.  This is fantastic feedback to receive.  When meeting various reps and peers many of them have said as soon as they hear the accent “Where are you from?” and as soon as we tell them they respond with “Oh wow – I’ve heard of you guys!”  So we really are making a name for ourselves! Well done the EHU Learning Technology team!

Keeping Peace in the House: Best Practices for Ensuring Faculty & Institutional Adoption of Technology – Harriette L. Spiegel, Instructional Specialist, University of Tennessee at Martin
The first session of the day was around how to get everyone on board with technology changes, developments or additions.  There was quite a bit of audience participation to discover how other institutions handle technology adoption.  The methods are all very similar.  There seemed to be quite some emphasis on using video technologies (Collaborate, Skype, Zoom, WebEx) to provide support.  I suppose this is mainly as US Institutions can be quite large or very spread out.  We’re very lucky in Edge Hill to be able to pop and see someone personally relatively easily! Even so, we could investigate more screen sharing to provide support in a timely and efficient way – especially if needed urgently!

Customising the User Experience, One Tab at a Time – Robert Torres, Blackboard Administrator, Berkeley College
A great session where Robert showed some of the fantastic work he’d been doing on the Berkeley Blackboard Community pages.  He has heavily modified the entry page with lots of great ideas on where to place social media icons and also (because they are self hosted) app server checks for help desks to use for troubleshooting.  He talked through the rationale of the tabs and contents and also some of the code that had been used to combine lists into menus.  Take a look below (apologies about the ‘phone’ picture quality!)

P_20150723_112207 P_20150723_114238

Increasing Student Engagement with Digital Badges – Melissa Stange, Lord Fairfax Community College; Richard Shelton & Dr Donna Shelton, Northeastern State University; Megan Cole – Badge Labs
An informative session about using badges in education.  They’re still building their evidence but early signs shows it works – mainly playing on competition between peers to encourage everyone to get involved! They are also working with external agencies to recognise the badges and awards to be used as evidence in CVs or in particular for specialist skills that certain companies require.  There are a number of organisations out there who are taking badges seriously and supporting creation and use, so hopefully this will be something fun for us to consider in the near future!

Product Innovations for International Clients in 2015 and Beyond – an overview
This session was much of the same that we’ve already heard.  Blackboard are trying hard to include all customers in their decisions – not just the US – and we have seen this effort in the development of some new features (although none that are particularly useful at the moment but hopefully could hold some potential in the future).  UK versions of Mobile for example come a little later than for the US but this has been explained that it is to ensure that localisation is done properly.  Good job we are a patient lot!

Overall, the conference was a fantastic experience.  We are doing lots of great work and will continue to do so so that the student experience is the best we can possibly offer when it comes to technology in education.

If you wish for any further information about what we saw, then please get in touch!
P_20150721_175819_HDR

LTD_Carol_Chatten

 

 

Carol Chatten
Learning Technology Development Officer

 

JL_Blog

 

 

John Langford
Learning Technology Development Systems Officer

Blackboard World Conference – Part 1

Washington DC – National Harbour Conference Centre, 20th-23rd July

John Langford and myself were invited to present at the Bb World Conference this year, demonstrating all the good work that Learning Services have been doing to customise and target content for our students by Faculty and Department.

We thought it would be a good idea to blog whilst attending the conference so as to ensure we keep in touch with our keen blog readers and also report back whilst very much fresh on our minds!

We’ve seen a number of great presentations today;

Using Template Variables and Creating Your Own – Brett Stephens, Systems Analyst, University of Miami
Brett demonstrated ‘template variables’ which are included in the main Blackboard platform and how he created a script that allowed the Institution to target a specific, unique to each user URL to complete a national student survey just to the students that it concerned.  This then also linked into a building block that could be deployed on Blackboard to activate or deactivate it.
This rings with what we are aiming to achieve with our own tabs and panels.  Being able to target content to unique users is a very powerful feature and one which I hope we can investigate further.

Leveraging Web Analytics in Blackboard Learn – Terry Patterson, LMS Application Administrator, University of Missouri
Terry is a highly entertaining Technologist with enthusiasm for analytics.  He has deployed a piece of software called Piwik to help gather useful statistics and data on student use of Blackboard including (but not limited to): Visitor barometer, Real-time map, real-time visitor count, visits over time, browser use, visitor platform and browser, track users flow of page clicks (so from which internal pages to other internal pages), hot spots on pages and also break this down into the tabs and tools used.
We would need to work out if it offers more than what Google Analytics currently offers us, but the dashboard looks really good and so could be a powerful tool to help educate others on the trends and habits of our users to help inform us to enhance their experience.

Best Practices for Implementing Blackboard Communities – Adam Voyton, Instructional Technology Project Specialist, Wilmington University
Adam gave a demonstration of their Communities integration covering how the Institution has developed and organised their tabs and modules (panels) and also how they handle Organisations.  Wilmington, interestingly enough, uses entire webpages for some of their tabs so as not to duplicate content.  It would be interesting to see what our students thought of that approach and whether it would work!  Overall, it was great to see very similar practice to our own occurring ‘across the Atlantic’ and we’ve picked up a few ideas that we’ll be bringing back to improve our own management and development.

Opening Keynote – Jay Bhatt, Jon Kolko, Annie Chechitelli and Stephanie Weeks, Blackboard
So the sessions above were the close of DevCon and the opening of the main conference, so now was the opportunity for Blackboard to speak.  The recording will be up online soon and we’ll provide the link as soon as possible but here’s a very brief summary:
The main focus was on the idea of ‘The New Learning Experience’.  This involves; focus on the learner; connected workflow; user experience; accessible and always on environment; and data analytics.
We always strive to provide the best experience for our students and of course there’s always room for improvement but it looks like Blackboard will be providing products that will support this…watch this space!

I suppose the last thing to mention is that we filmed our session for the online conference community today.  I must say it was very odd having to have your hair and makeup done for filming (just to powder off the shine – and I don’t just mean me but John too!).  We’re so used to being the voice behind the screencasts!  Anyway, we had to trim it to keep it concise but we hope we got over what needed to be said.  See what you think once it’s available.  Again, we’ll let you know the link.  (I won’t be watching it though!)

Here’s a photo of the film set…I won’t post the photo of John having his makeup done – he might never speak to me again!

BlackboardFilmSet

That’s it for today – off to the Welcome Party, so more to come tomorrow where we’ll be presenting!

LTD_Carol_Chatten

 

Carol Chatten
Learning Technology Delopment Officer

LTD on Location – English and History

Recently, I popped into the Department of English and History to discuss the upcoming academic year (Yes! we really do start that early!) and as a result of a brief conversation about what the department needs from Learning Technology, we came up with a great idea for me to be based in the department for portions of time through the two upcoming busy marking weeks.

Turnitin, Grade Mark, Grade Centre and Learning Edge can become a little overwhelming when all those submissions land.  So the best way to support academics was for me (as the Learning Technology Development Officer for English & History) to be stationed in the department during certain times.

Quite often a problem or question can be solved so easily by simply saying – “could you just take a look at this?”  Usually at the end of a phone or email it seems like it’s a game of 20 questions just to get to the beginning so that you’re both at the some point.  Being able to quickly pop into a tutor’s office or to quickly bring it up on a PC together cuts out so much description time!

I also had the chance to meet some colleagues who I’ve never had the pleasure to meet before.  We worked through lots of interesting ideas and Learning Edge ‘wish lists’, tackled some little (and some bigger!) problems that staff had had and all in a very timely manner and no hot ear from being on the phone for 20 minutes!

I had the company of Sheila Lewis in the admin department and the staff made me feel very welcome while I was there. I was even treated to a home-made custard cream!  (Thanks Andy!)

As a result I now know the department even better than before!  They know the areas I can help them with and hopefully the marking regime was a little easy.  In addition, I’ve committed myself to a game of ‘Marrying Mr Darcy’ one lunchtime at the end of June!

If you have a particular interest in having a member of LTD stationed in your department at key times during the year, speak to your departmental LTDO (listed below) and find out if they can be on location for you to help ease any technology woes!

David Callaghan
Education
Mark Wilcock
Education CPD and Health PPE
Peter Beaumont
Health
Martin Baxter
Media, Geography, Biology, Business, Social Sciences, Psychology, Law & Criminology
Carol Chatten
Computing, English and History, Sports, Performing Arts, Clinical Education

LTD_Carol_Chatten

 

Carol Chatten
Learning Technology Development Officer

Turnitin Grades – What Has Been Seen Cannot Be Unseen!

It’s that time again… marking.

Very few would actually admit to enjoying marking reams of students’ work right after the Christmas break but it is a necessary (evil) task.

And to make things worse, students seem to be finding their grades out early! How on Earth did that happen? You’ve done everything you thought you needed to, so how are they getting them!?

Yes, the process to hide grades and marks from students is a little convoluted. Ideally we’d have a single button that we could use to hide and then un-hide whenever we want (or even better, on a specific date!) but alas, no such magic exists… yet.  Whilst we await with fingers crossed for a better way, there are a couple of things you need to do now to get it right.

Here’s our top 5 tips for hiding grades:

  1. Remember the Post Date (This is the date on which TURNITIN gives access to any marks and comments you have left via the Turnitin Grade Mark feature).
    1
  2. Remember the option (within Optional Settings when setting up Turnitin) for ‘Reveal grades to students only on post date? > YES
    2
  3. Remember to hide the relevant column in the Grade Centre also (Turnitin is a separate programme to Blackboard, so don’t forget that not only do you have to hide in Turnitin, but also in Blackboard!)
    3
  4. Check that the grade isn’t being fed through to another column that ISN’T hidden! For example Total or Weighted Total column.
    4
  5. The final one that can be very annoying… if you forget to hide the grades until after you’ve entered marks, then even if you hide the columns retrospectively, if a student has already been in and seen their grade then it may have ‘cached’ on their web browser so regardless of what you do, they’ll still get to it!

If you have any questions at all about this information get in touch with your local friendly Learning Technologist for your department who will be more than happy to help our with any queries or niggles you may have with using Turnitin or Blackboard (or any other learning technology for that matter!)

Oh, still here? Excellent! How about a few more nuggets of information about online submissions?

  • Remember that Turnitin is an individual tool for checking originality in writing.  You don’t need to use it for Images, Videos, Audio, most presentations, or other work that is not predominantly text.  It’s also not designed to take group submissions, unless one person is submitting on everyone’s behalf and you know who that person is!
  • If you genuinely have a group submission, consider using the Blackboard Assignment tool which does allow submission by group (which you can also set up in Blackboard)
  • Also use Blackboard Assignment for ‘other’ file types.  Turnitin only like text files, so if you are submitting a file of a more unusual type, use Bb Assignment
  • Also with that in mind, Blackboard Assignment allows multiple file submissions – so may well be the best option if you are expecting more than one file from students.
  • Remember that Turnitin only accepts files up to 20mb in size!  Any bigger and it will be rejected!
  • Turnitin GradeMark is marking online – don’t forget that you can lose your comments if your connection is flaky (e.g. wireless) as the connection to the server will drop.  It’s probably best to make notes offline and then copy and paste them in to ensure there are no tears at the end of an epic marking sesh!
  • You can ‘navigate’ through students’ submission when marking using the arrows at the top of the page (this goes for Turnitin and Bb Assignment).
  • Don’t forget you can always download work if you find it easier for marking, or need to work offline.  Turnitin won’t allow you to upload a marked paper – so remember to make those comments so you can copy and paste, but Bb Assignment does, so you may wish to consider changing your assignment submission method.
  • It’s worth noting that we have a new feature in Blackboard Assignment called ‘Safe Assign‘.  This is an emerging originality checking tool that may in time replace Turnitin.  If you fancy giving it a go (possibly on a submission that’s not critical to having Turnitin features) then feel free to check it out in your Test Course or come and have a chat with LTD!

Carol_Chatten

 

 

Carol Chatten
Learning Technology Development Officer

Tab-tastic! Learning Edge now has faculty specific resources!

For new and returning students, there is something different in Learning Edge for this year!

For those returning, you may remember the Learning Services tab within Learning Edge, but now there is something even more special for each Faculty and Department for you to use.

The old tab has been replaced by Your FoHSC Resources, Your FoE Resources or Your FAS Resources.  Each one has specific resources tailored towards your Faculty and course so that you only get the most relevant information for your studies.

FoE tab   FoHSC tab   FAS tab

In each tab you will find panels full of useful information about your subject including videos, Twitter feeds, guides and quick links to the most needed materials (such as Referencing, Academic Skills, Journals, reading lists and more!)

readinglist        roombookings        eresources

Click an image for a larger preview

 

Keep an eye on these tabs as they will be dynamically updated to bring you the most relevant information depending on the time of year and will also change depending on what you are asking for to be included.  Just use Ask Us to let us know your ideas.

If you need any help please contact the Learning Services Help Desk based in the library.

 

 

Summer 2014 – Blackboard Upgrade Awareness Webinar

Summer each year allows a window of opportunity for Learning Technology to update Blackboard to the latest version, containing new features and fixing a number of niggles. This year, the upgrade will occur on the evening of Sunday 20th July into the morning of Monday 21st July.  During this time, there will be no access to Blackboard up until (we expect) Monday afternoon once we have carried out testing to make sure everything is running as expected.

Webinar 23rd and 24th July @ 14:00

To follow on from the upgrade, we are offering a short webinar where you can find out what the new features are and anything that you may need to be aware of.  There aren’t too many changes this time, so we don’t anticipate that the webinar will be a long one, but it will give you the opportunity for an overview and also ask questions to our team of Learning Technologists. The link you will need to join the webinar is:

JOIN THE SUMMER 2014 UPGRADE WEBINAR HERE

You can also access it via the Staff Development -> Staff Webinar Area under ‘Communities‘ in Blackboard Any questions, please contact the Learning Technology Development Team on ext. 7754 or ltdsupport@edgehill.ac.uk