Student Deals

Hey guys! Being a student has its perks and student discount is definitely one of them. Here are a few wallet essentials…

NUS card

My NUS card is something I could not live without. Examples of discounts are 12% off your railcard, 25% off in Pizza Express and 10% off in Topshop.  Recently, Liverpool One had a full day of the biggest student sales with 30% discounts. Your NUS card will also give you cheaper entry for Wednesday night socials at the SU.

Unidays app

Another way to receive store discounts is by downloading the Unidays app on your phone. Below are some current offers available and there are many more on their website, so get downloading!

Student ID card

On your first day of university you were given your student ID card with your picture and student number. I have made the mistake of forgetting to take it to the SU far too often! You’ll also need this to access and manage your library account when reserving books and taking them out of the library.

Railcard

Railcards are brilliant for saving money. If you plan on getting the train to university or to visit family and friends, railcards give you discounts of 33%. The 16-25 railcard is £30 per year, or £70 for a 3-year card. Even though the initial cost is a bit pricey, it is worthwhile in the long-run. My railcard has been useful for me to visit my brother down in London… looking back now, I wish I got the 3-year railcard considering the money I have saved!

Thank you for reading… enjoy the rest of your weekend!

Sean’s Random Encounters – Welcome Sunday 2018


Working on Welcome Sunday 2018 as a member of the Campus Life team gave me the opportunity to talk to many of the incoming first years at the university. You would think that this blog would be about freshers moving into halls. Or even a 3rd year returning to a new style townhouse in Woodland Court. But I have a much more interesting person in mind for this month’s edition of random encounters. Michael the student helper.


Image result for edge hill welcome sundayOn Welcome Sunday you will see about 40 or so students running around wearing yellow high visibility vests. Michael was one of these ‘student helpers’. He had given up the last Sunday of his summer to help students move into their on campus accommodation. I had the chance to ask him why.


Image result for edge hill welcome sunday‘I like helping people and I know it was hard for me to start out, so I want to put a smile on someone’s face.’ was the reply when asked why he wanted to work on this stress filled day. He also had no complaints about helping move boxes up and down stairs. ‘Someone did it for me, and i’m doing for them. Circle of life!’


As I thought about the day itself I realised that the student helpers around me were not tired, stressed or burnt out. They were smiling. These people had just spent a full day helping people move into their new homes and it gave most of them a sense of good karma. People like to help other people, and I honestly can say that the people that study, work and volunteer at Edge Hill University are some of the most helpful that I have ever met. The people make the place.


If you want to read more about Welcome Sunday check out my other blog here:

3 Tips for moving to Edge Hill University – Getting ready for Welcome Sunday



That’s all I have for you on this edition of random encounters but if you want to find out more about what to expect on campus you can check out Campus Life at EHU here. And please leave any questions you have for moving in below. You will get a personal response, fast.

And if you want more free and great information email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Parking at Edge Hill University- Yellow tickets don’t add power


Parking at Edge Hill can be a tricky one for new students and sometimes existing. Due to a lack of parking space available on and around campus parking permits are as rare as a sober first year in Alpine. With this in mind if you need to park and have a good reason to do so the university will try to accommodate you as much as possible. So here are 3 great tips to get your car in a space in or around the University.


Get a parking permit.

The best way to get your car near your classes is to register for an official EHU parking permit. These are rare because parking is so scarce on campus due to limited space. To get your permit you can fill out a form here: https://www.edgehill.ac.uk/services/parking/ . Be aware that you might not get one if you live close to the University.


Find parking in Ormskirk.

If you live in Ormskirk it may be possible to find on street parking outside your house. Usually streets are signposted with times that you can park on the road, however if you live on a ‘permit’ road you can, just like on campus, register for a permit here: https://www.westlancs.gov.uk/more/your-community/roads-and-travel/parking-permits.aspx . Again be aware that you might not qualify for a parking permit but it is worth a try. You can also try and find off street parking. Ormskirk Co-Op offers this for a set fee and you can find out more here: https://horizonparking.co.uk/ .


Car share or take the bus!

The only way to guarantee parking on campus every day is to book a car share parking space. With two people and two permits on display you are 100% sure to take a space on campus. Edge Hill is proud of its excellent transport links and offers a free bus service from Ormskirk town centre to both sides of the University. I would encourage all of you to consider taking the bus or other public transport to save on costs when trying to get to University. Parking is cool but trust me the bus is just easier.


Hopefully this blog answered all your questions about parking on campus. If you want to read more you can check out the university page here. The only other advice I can give you is this:

Don’t park on St. Helens road. You will be ticketed, clamped and possibly towed. 

If you want more free and great advice email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Flight Delays and Replacement Buses – Arriving by Plane to Edge Hill University


Arriving by plane to University can be daunting. I’ve been traveling back and forth from Ormskirk to Ireland for the last two years and although I have taken all manner of transport (Planes, Trains and Automobiles!), I can say with confidence that traveling by plane is the fastest, cheapest (Usually) and most comfortable. So here are three things to consider when flying to the University and check out the blog at the end for how to book and not miss your flight. This blog is going to focus on those of you with flights booked for Welcome Sunday.


1. Getting to the airport

Anyone can book a flight and pack suitcases but can you predict how long a security que will take to pass? Probably not. And trust me, missing your flight isn’t like the American movies where they will ‘rebook you in the morning’. Oh no, no, no. Ryanair wont give you a cabin bag so don’t expect another flight. Make sure you arrive on time and at least a full hour before the flight time to get through security, get to the gate and get on the plane. Check with your local airport and see if they have a security tracker online for the latest que numbers.


2. Taking the right luggage

Make sure you pay attention to what your flight will let you take with you. If you have booked hold luggage make sure you drop it off at the right time and pack everything correctly so it doesn’t break. If you are flying, like me usually, with RyanAir then read the cabin bag policy. The will take the big bags into the hold and smaller ones might be allowed on depending on the flight. Don’t be afraid to ditch luggage altogether and look at shipping to your new home. DHL offer next day service for a reasonable fee and as a regular customer I must say they never fail to deliver.


3. Plan your route from the airport

Don’t rely on google maps or Merseytravel guides to direct you to busses and trains. Plan ahead. This is especially important when the rail service is in upgrades or disputes as rail replacement busses might make you sad and confused. Also ensure you factor in the possibility of a delayed flight. It happens all the time and can cause chaos if you miss the last bus or train. Lucily I have an entire blog about this and you can click the link below to read more about planning your route.


Getting between home and Edge Hill University – Or how not to miss your flight


So that’s all there is to it. Get your flights, plan out your day around it and make backups in case the trains decide to go on strike. It isn’t as hard as you might think and you can do it with the right mind-set and preparation. And remember if you do miss your flight it isn’t the end of the world. You might have to pay for it, but you can always try and book another flight.

For other travel queries about getting to the university and for free advice about life at Edge Hill email think@edgehill.ac.uk

Best things about Ormskirk

Hey all, hope the end to your June has been good and you’re all doing well!

Edge Hill is in the town of Ormskirk; a small but lovely place. Not a lot of people outside of Liverpool that I’ve spoken to are aware of where it is, so I thought I’d let you guys know a little bit about the town!

Location

Ormskirk’s nearest big city is Liverpool; by train it takes between 30 and 40 minutes to get into the Liverpool Central train station. It is also a 15-20 minute train away from Aintree, the home of the Grand National. The trains run fairly regularly, so it’s great if you love going on days out to big cities but don’t like living in one! It’s also great if you’re a fan of night life, because the trains don’t stop until 23:37 at night!

What to do

In Ormskirk there are some really lovely shops. Not only do they have the usual you see on high streets, such as Waterstones and Clarks, but there are also some really lovely local businesses. There are the likes of cafes and pubs, but also gift shops and some shops that sell a unique array of goods.

I also really love the range of food places there are in Ormskirk; there’s a beach-themed restaurant and bar opened up the other month called Dinky Dory (where you get served your fries in a sandcastle bucket!), Wetherspoons, a couple of Bistros of the likes of Barnyard and Nordico Lounge and then takeaways galore!

There’s also the loveliest park called Coronation Park which you can go to if you want a walk or want to sunbathe during Summer!

The atmosphere

I think everyone who you ask about Ormskirk’s atmosphere will agree when I say it is such a lovely town. The people there are lovely and all the shop owners and people you pass in the town centre are so polite and kind. It’s the kind of place that you wouldn’t have to worry about feeling unwelcome in.

Like I said earlier, if you don’t like living in big cities, for example I come from a small town so I would have felt totally unsettled if I’d moved to, say, Liverpool itself, Ormskirk is somewhere that would be good for you.

Transport

As I mentioned above, the trains are quite regular to Liverpool, but you can also get trains towards Preston too. The train station itself can easily be found, as can the bus station. When you come down to the town centre from Edge Hill, the bus station is the first thing you see at the end of the road that the University is on! From there, there is a small footpath you can follow to get to the train station. Once you’ve been there once, you’ll easily find it again!

So, Ormskirk has a lot of great things about it! It’s got such lovely scenery, shops, and is easy to travel to and from! If you have any questions about anything specific, let me know in the comments below, you could even ask me if Ormskirk has something that you’re interested in knowing about!

Driving to Edge Hill University – 400 miles in 8 hours [Part 4]

LK to ORMS


Its time for the final part of this 4 part blog. In this final part I will sum up the journey and answer 3 of the most asked questions I received about the drive itself. I hope these blogs have been genuine help to those of you who are thinking about making the drive to university from afar.


Is it worth it?

Yes, and no. Driving back to collect my things was more for the fun of it rather than anything else. I really enjoy driving so I knew I wanted to make this long drive. But the truth of the fact is I could have posted my stuff back home for a fraction of the cost.

At the same time, living in Ormskirk next year, I am considering keeping my car there permanently. It makes live easy to get shopping and whatnot and gives a real sense of freedom.


How much does it cost

TL;DR – £350

It really depends on the type of car that you drive and how you drive it. First thing first, fuel. It cost me £80 in fuel overall and when I got home I had a little to spare. That was in my 1.4L Citroen C3. Roughly it runs 100 miles to £10.  Alongside that the ferry cost around £225. That was for both of us back and forth.

You need to factor in food and other costs, but you can make it on about £350 or so.


What if something happens

It can be troubling to think that you car could break down or something could happen but its important to think positive. Make sure you plan for the worst possible outcome in any scenario. That could be breaking down, or running out of fuel. Remember that if you do end up breaking down on the motorway its not the end of the world. Check the basics before you start and as you drive.

If the worst happens keep a recovery companies number handy. It is also worth paying for a flexi ticket on the ferry so you can travel whenever you want.


You can read PART 3 here:

Driving to Edge Hill University – 400 miles in 8 hours [Part 3]


That its everything for the last part of this blog. Please leave any questions you have for me below. You will get a personal response, fast.

And if you want more free and great information on any topic email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Driving to Edge Hill University – 400 miles in 8 hours [Part 3]

LK to ORMS


We’re coming to the end of the 4 part blog series on driving from Ireland to England and its been fun sharing my experience with you over the last 4 weeks. I think before I sum up everything that happened in the few days of driving between here and there I should give you 3 more practical tips for driving itself. Just like last week they pretty much apply to any long drive that you undertake.


Related image1. Check your car

Long trips can be hard on a cars engine. Make sure you take spare fluids with you. Water, oil, windscreen fluid etc. When you stop off take a few moments to pop the bonnet and take a look. If you don’t know how to check, read your cars handbook.


Image result for traffic report2. Listen to the Traffic Reports

Traffic reports on the radio will give you a good idea on what is up ahead. You can use this knowledge to pick times to stop and have a break while letting the traffic clear ahead. Make sure you also have a look at roadworks and road closures on your route. Google Maps is good for this.


3. Use a good sat navImage result for sat nav

It might be your phone or a classic Sat Nav. Make sure you have something that is going to give you good, reliable and constant directions to where you need to go. I use my phone paired with Android Auto. It works well.


You can read PART 2 of this blog here:

Driving to Edge Hill University – 400 miles in 8 hours [Part 2]


That its everything for part three of this blog. I’ll post more on my trip with in depth photos and advice tonight in the last part of my blog. And please leave any questions you have for me below. You will get a personal response, fast.

And if you want more free and great information on any topic email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Driving to Edge Hill University – 400 miles in 8 hours [Part 2]

LK to ORMS


Last week I wrote about driving to EHU and gave some tips for what to bring with you and how to get started. Getting started is one thing but actually undertaking the journey is another. So here is another three tips when your on the road. They pretty much translate to any journey.


Image result for citroen c3 speedDrive with your brain.

There is little to no point in driving like you stole your car. Not just because you could crash but because its a long drive. Driving faster reduces your fuel economy and can cause issues with the car itself. Stick to the limit, there are cops too ya know.


Image result for motorway servicesStay alert and take breaks

Services on the motorway are usually frequent and worth stopping at. Don’t bother with fuel, it’s usually far more expensive than the likes of ASDA and Tesco, but coffee and food is alright. Driving can take its toll, especially at night. If you feel tired remember, stop sip and sleep. Stop, sip a coffee and have a nap. If your chronically fatigued the only cure is a good nights sleep.


Image result for android autoBring the music

Finally on the trip make sure you bring some music and entertainment. There is no point in sitting in silence. Its also worth downloading the songs in case you loose signal or run out of data. That’s not fun.


You can read PART 1 of this blog here:

Driving to Edge Hill University – 400 miles in 8 hours [Part 1]


That its everything for part two of this blog. Over the next few weeks I’ll post more on my trip with in depth photos and advice. And please leave any questions you have for me below. You will get a personal response, fast.

And if you want more free and great information on any topic email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Driving to Edge Hill University – 400 miles in 8 hours [Part 1]

LK to ORMS


When I first moved to Ormskirk I knew at some point I would want to make the drive from home, just outside Letterkenny, Ireland to Ormskirk. 60% for fun and 40% to pickup all my things and take them home for the summer. Over my first year at university I passed my driving test so as soon as I few home I began to plan my journey back to pick up my things and fully move out. If you’re thinking of doing the same hopefully this blog will give you a few useful tips.


Image result for citroen c3 2004 blackStep one, acquire wheels.

After passing my driving test the first task for me was getting a car and insurance. For almost nothing I acquired this lovely little 1.4 Citroen C3. You might say it looks like a mums car, but with a full service history and one of the best little engines on the market this quirky car was my first choice. I also got it from my mum but I mean free is free.


Image result for google mapsStep two, plan your route.

I spent a good week looking at different routes and ways to get from here to there. It all turned out to be in vain because I only looked at one ferry company and actually could have had a much easier and cheaper trip. So do your planning if you are thinking about making a big journey anywhere. 15 minutes could save 15 hours.


File:Two friends adventure.jpgStep three, find a companion. 

You think you want to drive alone, you think you can make it 10 hours without falling asleep. You can’t. Find someone to go with you. I took my girlfriend and made a bit of a holiday of it. Completely worth it. Plus they can kick in petrol money if you’re tight! Just make sure its someone who won’t pull out last second.


That its everything for part one of this blog. Over the next few weeks I’ll post more on my trip with in depth photos and advice. And please leave any questions you have for me below. You will get a personal response, fast.

And if you want more free and great information on any topic email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Travelling Tips

Hey all, hope you’ve had a great week and you’re looking forward to the summer you’ve got ahead of you!

As this Uni year has drawn to a close, travelling is the main thing on my mind. I live in West Yorkshire, so by train it’s about 3 hours away from Ormskirk.

Before I came to Edge Hill, I didn’t really travel much, especially not by train. I think I’d been on 2 trains in my life, so travel was one of those things that brought me a lot of nerves when I thought about it. However, after a few trips there and back, I started to get a lot less nervous!

There are a few things that I’ve noticed help when it comes to preparing for travelling, so I thought I’d share these with you:

  • Make a list: listing what you need to take with you before you pack makes life a heck of a lot easier. I’ve found that when I’m packing without a list I tend to forget things, whereas when I have my list I can just grab those things to pack and then pack anything like books and that that I want rather than need for travelling.
  • Keep your tickets in the same place: this one seems obvious, but there’s been times that I haven’t done this and let’s just say there’s nothing worse than coming up to a train station ruffling through your wallet finding the correct train ticket. I guess it comes as a second point of this that you should bin old tickets, cause it can get confusing!
  • Give yourself time: if you’re getting multiple trains like I do, make sure you give yourself enough time between the trains. Even if you’re just changing platforms, it’s much easier and nicer to wait than rush across a train station.
  • Off-Peak: if you’ve got a big suitcase, it’s much easier to go for off-peak times, and avoid lunch and the times when people will be travelling to and from 9-5 jobs. You’ll get a hang of when these times are the more you travel, but it’s a good thing to keep an eye on to begin with.

So those are just a few things that I’ve found help ease my nerves. I hope these tips help anyone who is reading this!