Leaving Home and Going to Uni

The day is here, it’s the Saturday or Sunday before Welcome Week, and you’re getting ready to head off to start your time at University. You might be feeling as I was, anxious, excited and ecstatic all in one, or you might feel all nerves or all excitement everyone’s different, so following on from my last  blog post I am just going to give a few pointer’s on how to make the most of your arrival at uni.

Talk to your new flatmates: Chances are if you choose to live in halls, you will be moving in  together with a load of new people which is definitely a frightening thought for some, but it doesn’t need to be. When you first arrive at your new accommodation, everyone else will be feeling the same way so while it is extremely tempting to just hide in your room and hope people leave you alone it’s best to just familiarise yourself with your new surroundings and meet/get to know the people your going to be living with. It’s a hell of a lot easier to say hello to your flatmate if they come into the kitchen if you already are at least acquainted with each other.

Create an aesthetically pleasing room to live in: This is simple, bring stuff with you from home that you can put in your room to make it feel more like home. Now me personally, I’m not really bothered about getting 50 Polaroids of all your friends and sticking them on the wall but maybe you want to and that’s totally fine, whatever you like. I prefer posters of things I like such as TV shows, films, games etc. There’s a brilliant poster sale in the Hub on the first week that has loads to choose from, I grabbed a cool Breaking Bad and Rick and Morty poster to add to my collection and liven up my room.

Room

So yeah just a couple of ways to make that moving in process just a bit easier which can’t be a bad thing eh? I’ve also included a link to my previous blog on packing for university, hope you enjoy!

 

https://blogs.edgehill.ac.uk/insideedge/2018/12/10/preparing-to-leave-home/

Preparing to Leave Home

Hi everyone, for my second blog I’m just going to talk a little about moving out of home for the first time and going to University, and what you can do to prepare to make the transition more manageable, enjoyable and hopefully A lot less stressful!

1. Pack early: I know this might seem obvious but starting your packing even a week before leaving home is a really good idea, trust me. You don’t realise until it comes to packing how much stuff you need to bring with you, clothes, gadgets, trinkets and whatever else begin to pile up really quickly. In my personal experience even though I had done most of my packing by the time I was ready to leave, I still found myself running around like a headless chicken looking for my headphones and whatever else I realised I would definitely need.

Bag

2. Book travel well in advance: Doing this not only saves a lot of stress but also a lot of money. Obviously depending on where you live or your travel situation circumstances will be different but if you know you will be travelling by train or boat or plane, booking earlier can save you a lot of hassle that can be caused by booked up journeys or lack of luggage, space say if you were going on a busy flight and needed cabin baggage. In my experience if you book for example, A flight a month beforehand which in my case was coming over from Northern Ireland, an early booked flight would only usually cost £10/20 but leave it too close to the date and you could end up paying more like £50/60 which is a LOT more if you’re a budgeting student.

Plane

3. Don’t worry if your late: I know you definitely want to arrive on time for your moving in day and you most likely will, but on the off-chance you don’t (like me) don’t stress, Edge Hill is very accommodating and even though I was one of the last people to pick up my keys, someone still took the time to show me to my accommodation where I finally arrived to meet my flatmates for the first time, which didn’t make any difference that I was late as everyone was also still pretty nervous! Moral of the story, chill out it will be fine :).

Setting up your Console in Halls – Gaming at Edge Hill University [Part 1]

Connecting your console at EHU


Connecting your console at Edge Hill can seem complicated. The number one question that I hear is how to make X work with the network. So this blog hopefully will clear some information up on getting your Xbox, Wii, or PlayStation connected to the network. Before I continue I have to include this disclaimer:

I do not work for IT Services. If you break or use their network in any way that is against the terms and conditions they will be mad. Keep it fair and fast for all.


What halls can connect?

At the moment, not all halls across campus have access to the Ethernet network. This applies to older halls. For example Back, Main and Forest, you’re out of luck for a wired connection, we’ll discuss wireless options later.

Halls that are currently supported:

  • Chancellors Court
  • Founders Court
  • Graduates Court
  • Palatine Court
  • Woodland Court

You will also need an Ethernet cable the cheapest one will suffice, check these out.


Information you need before applying

It’s important to gather all the information you need before you submit your application, there are two pieces that are essential to apply to register your games console on campus: the MAC and the port number.

The port number can be found on the Ethernet ports in your room. Like this:

As for your mac address this is where it gets complex. Luckily the great people over at IT services have a guide for the most common systems, you can check it out here!


The final steps

Once you have your information and you are ready to apply you can follow the form here: https://servicedesk.edgehill.ac.uk/wssp/DetailWebFormNew.aspx?Webform=RegisterWiredConsole

Once submitted you should get an email about a new case being opened. They aim to register the console within 10 days but it is usually a lot sooner.

Once registered you can plug your console and start to play! Some ports may be locked down but in my experience it isn’t many. For technical minds the blocked ports I found were 25 (SMTP) and most of the Microsoft Remote Desktop ports.


A few more tips for wired connections:

  • Your bandwidth gets limited to 100mb/s, you wont notice it
  • You are on a different network from the regular network, things like Microsoft glass might not like this.
  • Don’t register your Computer as a Console. IT will be unhappy.
  • The console registration lasts for a year, that means you will need to do it again if you move back on campus.

That’s all I have for you on this blog but please stay tuned.

Part two will cover connecting consoles to WiFi and Gaming on a PC.

And if you want more free and great information email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!


 

Student Deals

Hey guys! Being a student has its perks and student discount is definitely one of them. Here are a few wallet essentials…

NUS card

My NUS card is something I could not live without. Examples of discounts are 12% off your railcard, 25% off in Pizza Express and 10% off in Topshop.  Recently, Liverpool One had a full day of the biggest student sales with 30% discounts. Your NUS card will also give you cheaper entry for Wednesday night socials at the SU.

Unidays app

Another way to receive store discounts is by downloading the Unidays app on your phone. Below are some current offers available and there are many more on their website, so get downloading!

Student ID card

On your first day of university you were given your student ID card with your picture and student number. I have made the mistake of forgetting to take it to the SU far too often! You’ll also need this to access and manage your library account when reserving books and taking them out of the library.

Railcard

Railcards are brilliant for saving money. If you plan on getting the train to university or to visit family and friends, railcards give you discounts of 33%. The 16-25 railcard is £30 per year, or £70 for a 3-year card. Even though the initial cost is a bit pricey, it is worthwhile in the long-run. My railcard has been useful for me to visit my brother down in London… looking back now, I wish I got the 3-year railcard considering the money I have saved!

Thank you for reading… enjoy the rest of your weekend! Anna 🙂

Sean’s Random Encounters – Welcome Sunday 2018


Working on Welcome Sunday 2018 as a member of the Campus Life team gave me the opportunity to talk to many of the incoming first years at the university. You would think that this blog would be about freshers moving into halls. Or even a 3rd year returning to a new style townhouse in Woodland Court. But I have a much more interesting person in mind for this month’s edition of random encounters. Michael the student helper.


Image result for edge hill welcome sundayOn Welcome Sunday you will see about 40 or so students running around wearing yellow high visibility vests. Michael was one of these ‘student helpers’. He had given up the last Sunday of his summer to help students move into their on campus accommodation. I had the chance to ask him why.


Image result for edge hill welcome sunday‘I like helping people and I know it was hard for me to start out, so I want to put a smile on someone’s face.’ was the reply when asked why he wanted to work on this stress filled day. He also had no complaints about helping move boxes up and down stairs. ‘Someone did it for me, and i’m doing for them. Circle of life!’


As I thought about the day itself I realised that the student helpers around me were not tired, stressed or burnt out. They were smiling. These people had just spent a full day helping people move into their new homes and it gave most of them a sense of good karma. People like to help other people, and I honestly can say that the people that study, work and volunteer at Edge Hill University are some of the most helpful that I have ever met. The people make the place.


If you want to read more about Welcome Sunday check out my other blog here:

3 Tips for moving to Edge Hill University – Getting ready for Welcome Sunday



That’s all I have for you on this edition of random encounters but if you want to find out more about what to expect on campus you can check out Campus Life at EHU here. And please leave any questions you have for moving in below. You will get a personal response, fast.

And if you want more free and great information email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Parking at Edge Hill University- Yellow tickets don’t add power


Parking at Edge Hill can be a tricky one for new students and sometimes existing. Due to a lack of parking space available on and around campus parking permits are as rare as a sober first year in Alpine. With this in mind if you need to park and have a good reason to do so the university will try to accommodate you as much as possible. So here are 3 great tips to get your car in a space in or around the University.


Get a parking permit.

The best way to get your car near your classes is to register for an official EHU parking permit. These are rare because parking is so scarce on campus due to limited space. To get your permit you can fill out a form here: https://www.edgehill.ac.uk/services/parking/ . Be aware that you might not get one if you live close to the University.


Find parking in Ormskirk.

If you live in Ormskirk it may be possible to find on street parking outside your house. Usually streets are signposted with times that you can park on the road, however if you live on a ‘permit’ road you can, just like on campus, register for a permit here: https://www.westlancs.gov.uk/more/your-community/roads-and-travel/parking-permits.aspx . Again be aware that you might not qualify for a parking permit but it is worth a try. You can also try and find off street parking. Ormskirk Co-Op offers this for a set fee and you can find out more here: https://horizonparking.co.uk/ .


Car share or take the bus!

The only way to guarantee parking on campus every day is to book a car share parking space. With two people and two permits on display you are 100% sure to take a space on campus. Edge Hill is proud of its excellent transport links and offers a free bus service from Ormskirk town centre to both sides of the University. I would encourage all of you to consider taking the bus or other public transport to save on costs when trying to get to University. Parking is cool but trust me the bus is just easier.


Hopefully this blog answered all your questions about parking on campus. If you want to read more you can check out the university page here. The only other advice I can give you is this:

Don’t park on St. Helens road. You will be ticketed, clamped and possibly towed. 

If you want more free and great advice email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Flight Delays and Replacement Buses – Arriving by Plane to Edge Hill University


Arriving by plane to University can be daunting. I’ve been traveling back and forth from Ormskirk to Ireland for the last two years and although I have taken all manner of transport (Planes, Trains and Automobiles!), I can say with confidence that traveling by plane is the fastest, cheapest (Usually) and most comfortable. So here are three things to consider when flying to the University and check out the blog at the end for how to book and not miss your flight. This blog is going to focus on those of you with flights booked for Welcome Sunday.


1. Getting to the airport

Anyone can book a flight and pack suitcases but can you predict how long a security que will take to pass? Probably not. And trust me, missing your flight isn’t like the American movies where they will ‘rebook you in the morning’. Oh no, no, no. Ryanair wont give you a cabin bag so don’t expect another flight. Make sure you arrive on time and at least a full hour before the flight time to get through security, get to the gate and get on the plane. Check with your local airport and see if they have a security tracker online for the latest que numbers.


2. Taking the right luggage

Make sure you pay attention to what your flight will let you take with you. If you have booked hold luggage make sure you drop it off at the right time and pack everything correctly so it doesn’t break. If you are flying, like me usually, with RyanAir then read the cabin bag policy. The will take the big bags into the hold and smaller ones might be allowed on depending on the flight. Don’t be afraid to ditch luggage altogether and look at shipping to your new home. DHL offer next day service for a reasonable fee and as a regular customer I must say they never fail to deliver.


3. Plan your route from the airport

Don’t rely on google maps or Merseytravel guides to direct you to busses and trains. Plan ahead. This is especially important when the rail service is in upgrades or disputes as rail replacement busses might make you sad and confused. Also ensure you factor in the possibility of a delayed flight. It happens all the time and can cause chaos if you miss the last bus or train. Lucily I have an entire blog about this and you can click the link below to read more about planning your route.


Getting between home and Edge Hill University – Or how not to miss your flight


So that’s all there is to it. Get your flights, plan out your day around it and make backups in case the trains decide to go on strike. It isn’t as hard as you might think and you can do it with the right mind-set and preparation. And remember if you do miss your flight it isn’t the end of the world. You might have to pay for it, but you can always try and book another flight.

For other travel queries about getting to the university and for free advice about life at Edge Hill email think@edgehill.ac.uk

Best things about Ormskirk

Hey all, hope the end to your June has been good and you’re all doing well!

Edge Hill is in the town of Ormskirk; a small but lovely place. Not a lot of people outside of Liverpool that I’ve spoken to are aware of where it is, so I thought I’d let you guys know a little bit about the town!

Location

Ormskirk’s nearest big city is Liverpool; by train it takes between 30 and 40 minutes to get into the Liverpool Central train station. It is also a 15-20 minute train away from Aintree, the home of the Grand National. The trains run fairly regularly, so it’s great if you love going on days out to big cities but don’t like living in one! It’s also great if you’re a fan of night life, because the trains don’t stop until 23:37 at night!

What to do

In Ormskirk there are some really lovely shops. Not only do they have the usual you see on high streets, such as Waterstones and Clarks, but there are also some really lovely local businesses. There are the likes of cafes and pubs, but also gift shops and some shops that sell a unique array of goods.

I also really love the range of food places there are in Ormskirk; there’s a beach-themed restaurant and bar opened up the other month called Dinky Dory (where you get served your fries in a sandcastle bucket!), Wetherspoons, a couple of Bistros of the likes of Barnyard and Nordico Lounge and then takeaways galore!

There’s also the loveliest park called Coronation Park which you can go to if you want a walk or want to sunbathe during Summer!

The atmosphere

I think everyone who you ask about Ormskirk’s atmosphere will agree when I say it is such a lovely town. The people there are lovely and all the shop owners and people you pass in the town centre are so polite and kind. It’s the kind of place that you wouldn’t have to worry about feeling unwelcome in.

Like I said earlier, if you don’t like living in big cities, for example I come from a small town so I would have felt totally unsettled if I’d moved to, say, Liverpool itself, Ormskirk is somewhere that would be good for you.

Transport

As I mentioned above, the trains are quite regular to Liverpool, but you can also get trains towards Preston too. The train station itself can easily be found, as can the bus station. When you come down to the town centre from Edge Hill, the bus station is the first thing you see at the end of the road that the University is on! From there, there is a small footpath you can follow to get to the train station. Once you’ve been there once, you’ll easily find it again!

So, Ormskirk has a lot of great things about it! It’s got such lovely scenery, shops, and is easy to travel to and from! If you have any questions about anything specific, let me know in the comments below, you could even ask me if Ormskirk has something that you’re interested in knowing about!

Driving to Edge Hill University – 400 miles in 8 hours [Part 4]

LK to ORMS


Its time for the final part of this 4 part blog. In this final part I will sum up the journey and answer 3 of the most asked questions I received about the drive itself. I hope these blogs have been genuine help to those of you who are thinking about making the drive to university from afar.


Is it worth it?

Yes, and no. Driving back to collect my things was more for the fun of it rather than anything else. I really enjoy driving so I knew I wanted to make this long drive. But the truth of the fact is I could have posted my stuff back home for a fraction of the cost.

At the same time, living in Ormskirk next year, I am considering keeping my car there permanently. It makes live easy to get shopping and whatnot and gives a real sense of freedom.


How much does it cost

TL;DR – £350

It really depends on the type of car that you drive and how you drive it. First thing first, fuel. It cost me £80 in fuel overall and when I got home I had a little to spare. That was in my 1.4L Citroen C3. Roughly it runs 100 miles to £10.  Alongside that the ferry cost around £225. That was for both of us back and forth.

You need to factor in food and other costs, but you can make it on about £350 or so.


What if something happens

It can be troubling to think that you car could break down or something could happen but its important to think positive. Make sure you plan for the worst possible outcome in any scenario. That could be breaking down, or running out of fuel. Remember that if you do end up breaking down on the motorway its not the end of the world. Check the basics before you start and as you drive.

If the worst happens keep a recovery companies number handy. It is also worth paying for a flexi ticket on the ferry so you can travel whenever you want.


You can read PART 3 here:

Driving to Edge Hill University – 400 miles in 8 hours [Part 3]


That its everything for the last part of this blog. Please leave any questions you have for me below. You will get a personal response, fast.

And if you want more free and great information on any topic email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Driving to Edge Hill University – 400 miles in 8 hours [Part 3]

LK to ORMS


We’re coming to the end of the 4 part blog series on driving from Ireland to England and its been fun sharing my experience with you over the last 4 weeks. I think before I sum up everything that happened in the few days of driving between here and there I should give you 3 more practical tips for driving itself. Just like last week they pretty much apply to any long drive that you undertake.


Related image1. Check your car

Long trips can be hard on a cars engine. Make sure you take spare fluids with you. Water, oil, windscreen fluid etc. When you stop off take a few moments to pop the bonnet and take a look. If you don’t know how to check, read your cars handbook.


Image result for traffic report2. Listen to the Traffic Reports

Traffic reports on the radio will give you a good idea on what is up ahead. You can use this knowledge to pick times to stop and have a break while letting the traffic clear ahead. Make sure you also have a look at roadworks and road closures on your route. Google Maps is good for this.


3. Use a good sat navImage result for sat nav

It might be your phone or a classic Sat Nav. Make sure you have something that is going to give you good, reliable and constant directions to where you need to go. I use my phone paired with Android Auto. It works well.


You can read PART 2 of this blog here:

Driving to Edge Hill University – 400 miles in 8 hours [Part 2]


That its everything for part three of this blog. I’ll post more on my trip with in depth photos and advice tonight in the last part of my blog. And please leave any questions you have for me below. You will get a personal response, fast.

And if you want more free and great information on any topic email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!