Applying for Jobs as a Student

Hi guys, in previous blogs I have talked about working for Edge Hill and the opportunities available, but for this blog I thought since we are coming up to the summer when most students are looking for work, I would talk about applying for part time-work to compliment your studies and a few things to keep in mind.


Get your CV checked: If you are an Edge Hill student then you can get your CV checked by the careers team. This can be very useful as they can give you advice on changes to make that you might not have thought of otherwise, alternatively if you aren’t a uni student yet, then someone you know or a careers advisor, teacher etc. might be useful to ask as you never know how a second opinion could give you a different view.application


Apply everywhere: If you see a job that’s doable and within range then apply, even if you don’t think you will get it, applying for lot’s of roles means you are always going to have a better chance of getting something, there’s no limit to how many applications you can put in, so you might as well!


Interview Prep: If you are lucky enough to get an interview then it’s time to prepare, do your research on the business you have applied for. But even more importantly think of answers to some typical interview questions you may be asked. Common examples could include ‘a time you dealt with a pressurised situation’ or ‘a time you worked successfully as part of a team’. The more interviews you do the more used to these types of questions you will become and answers will come to you more naturally.


Be patient: Chances are depending on how lucky you are or how much experience you have, finding a job could take a while, so it’s important to keep motivated. Students are sometimes less sought out, as employers could see them as being less available because of study commitments and if your like me and live between countries for home and uni then finding a suitable job can be even more of a challenge but the important thing is to keep your options open and keep applying.

Juggling your time whilst at university

With the second semester now underway I’ve decided to turn my attention to my time management. Time management is incredibly important, especially whilst at uni. There is just so much that we all want to fit into our days that without planning it is easy to find yourself with an increasing workload.

But this doesn’t have to be the case! By having a few simple time management tricks you can free up so much time for going out with friends or simply an extra lazy afternoon. Here’s some top tips that I use to manage my time.

1. Use a diary for important dates and for planning your week

Without my diary I would be completely lost! I have a paper diary that I carry in my bag as I find this the most helpful way of being able to see clearly what I need to do and when. However, whatever type of diary works for you would work just as well. By spending a few minutes at the start of my week working out what I want to achieve by the end of it I can ensure that I leave enough time for the things that are important to me, like going to the gym and spending time with my family.


2. Don’t be afraid to say no

Sometimes we all need time to ourselves to relax and just have some time being lazy or to take a nap. It is important to remember that this is completely okay. Saying no to friends, family or extra commitments occasionally can help to improve your health and will let your body rest and recharge, meaning you’ll feel much better about your week ahead. 

3. Try to get your work schedule in advance

If you’re working a part-time job whilst studying try to get your work schedule as far in advance as you can. Whilst this isn’t always possible, fitting your work hours in during the quieter times of your semester can help you to free up valuable time around submission deadlines.

Comment below with any top tips that you have, it’s great to share. 

Improving Your CV at EHU

As I’m sure you’ve been told many times before, your CV is an important document, and making sure it is well fleshed out is part of what makes a good CV. Any volunteering or part time work will show commitment, as well as any skills you’ve picked up along the way. These could be specialised (relating to your job, like for instance, waiting tables) or generalised (things such as teamwork and responsibility). In any case, you should have numerous opportunities to further bolster your CV throughout your time at Edge Hill University.

The Careers Centre on campus, currently located in the Student Information Centre (SIC), can provide assistance in acquiring a part-time job in the surrounding areas whilst at university, through the use of lists of availabilities; insight into the best places and websites to check for openings; and interview tips. Additionally, they can also help with finding volunteer work. For example, Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust have a centre called the Martin Mere Wetland Centre that accepts volunteers to assist with various aspects of their conservation work, from helping in the visitor centre to maintaining the grounds.

To make sure you get some basic help with CVs and future prospects, someone from the Careers Centre comes into a lecture once or twice a year, to provide that vital information. Then you can, of course, book an appointment with a Careers Advisers for a one to one, more personal, conversation about where your future is headed.

Accompanying the campus Careers Centre, there is the careers centre website. The website has many features, from “ask a question” where you can get feedback on your CV, amongst other things, to the lists of resources and opportunities – some of which are at Edge Hill themselves.

There are numerous opportunities at Edge Hill for part time work, I myself have worked for both the Money Advice Team and the Student Recruitment Team, as well as being part of the Student Casual Bank. Then there is also the chance to work on open days, applicant visit days, and giving campus tours to prospective students throughout the year.

In short, Edge Hill provides many ways to better yourself and have that show on your CV, whilst providing you with the tools to make sure your career is heading in the direction that you want it to.

 

Opportunities I’ve had this year

Being a Student Ambassador

In a post a few weeks ago, I talked about becoming and being a Student Guide. I’ve been a Student Guide for both of my years at uni and has been a big part of my experience, so I thought it deserved it’s own post. However, I also thought I’d talk a little bit about being a Student Ambassador too.

You have to be a Student Guide to become a Student Ambassador. You are also required to have an interview and write an application, that are completely separate to the Student Guide training and, as such, you also attend an extra day of training. As a Student Ambassador, we are paid a little more, to reflect the extra work we carry out, and the level of professionalism required of us. As a Student Guide, you will often be on shift on campus with one of the managers, who will guide you through the day. As a Student Ambassador, you are usually with only one other ambassador (this could be more or less, depending on the event) and are required to travel. This may be 15 minutes down the road, or it may require you to catch a plane; it really varies.

Student Ambassadors carry out very similar jobs to Student Guides, just off-campus. Obviously away from campus, you cannot give a tour, but you may be expected to give a talk or workshop. You may also be required to work on a stand, giving and receiving information to and from potential applications.

I love being an ambassador, as it means I get to speak to so many different people!

Being a Digital Leader

In January, after my trip to Bett (British Educational Training and Technology Show) in London, I spoke briefly about being a Digital Leader. It’s been a while, but I thought I’d expand upon what being a Digital Leader means to you and me.

So, I don’t know if any other courses have people like us, but the #DLEHU team (check us out on twitter) is specific to the Primary Education degree. We are a team of 12, all from different year groups, and we are guided by Senior Lecturer Sarah Wright, in order to make the best possible impact we can.

Our main goal this year has been to encourage lecturers to get more involved with our discussions on twitter; use different types of technology (and avoid powerpoint as much as possible). We still have more progress to make, but I’m more than confident for next year. I can’t tell you too much about our future plans right now, but we have a really exciting year ahead, that I know I’m looking forwards to.

Being a Student Representative

Now, I’ve used the umbrella term ‘Student Rep,’ because I was not only Group Representative this year, but also Year Group Representative. Think of the Group Reps like your School Councillor, who collect information from you to feedback during a meeting. This is similar to how we work, although instead of feeding back to a meeting, the Group Rep will send their feedback forms to the two Year Group Reps, who will then take it to a meeting, usually with the Year Head and some other members of the faculty. I’ve also had the pleasure to attend a Programmes Board meeting, which helped me to see what was happening to our feedback, and the changes that were being made as a result.

I hope that has given you some insight into some of the roles you may have the opportunity to take on at university. Until next time!