Film and TV Production: What’s it like?

Hi guys, for today’s blog I’m gonna talk about the course I am currently studying within the media department, and some things that you may not know if your thinking about doing this or something similar.

Type of material studied: Film and TV production is at its core a creative subject so you know that there will be lot’s of practical work throughout the course, but what you may not know is that there is a fair bit of theory behind the material as well. This is down to it being an honours degree so there has to be an element of theoretical understanding behind what you are studying. Now, I honestly can’t say I loved all of it! But, it’s definitely not all bad and some if it is pretty interesting and in some aspects can feed in nicely to your York Passunderstanding of the production side of things.

Travel opportunities: If you are interested in trips away then there are things available, this year there was a placement opportunity in Greece if that interest’s you. Closer to home last year we went to York for the annual film festival which is a neat day out.

Events within the University: The Festival in a day is a big one for the media department as they get in different speakers from various roles within the industry, there are also raffles for work placements as well. Speakers can also come in at other times of the year to give masterclasses and are usually free to attend if you are a student, most recently David Yates visited, the director of four Harry Potter films and both Fantastic Beast’s features. These events are definitely something to look out for if your thinking of, or already are studyFestival in a day postering at Edge Hill!

That’s all for today, any question’s let me know and thanks for reading!

Jordan

Third Year Film and Television Production: First Semester Summary!

So here I am again, back talking to you about my modules. Today’s post is all about my first semester of my third year in Film and Television Production!

Currently, I’m in my last semester ever on uni which is very weird, but also exciting at the same time! So quite a bit has changed over this last semester, and I’ve learnt so much about university life which I can’t wait to share with you over the next couple of months! Anyway, as I did before in my first and second-year semester posts, I will be going through the modules, giving my opinion on each one, enjoy!
(Disclaimer: modules on this course are always changing so might be different or non-existent by the time you’re reading this blog post.)


Independent Film Production (Compulsory)
Short version: Great module, however, it’s a lot of work!

Independent Film Production enables you to work independently to produce a film of a professional standard. The Independent film genre gives students the experience of working within industry guidelines, producing a digital and HD film within the confines of a limited budget, with a larger production team and within a restricted timescale.”

Behind the scenes.

Long version: As the quote suggests, film production is all about creating a 10 to 15-minute short film. The module is marked in two parts: a production folder with trailer and the film itself. The folder is full of all your paperwork that you have completed while creating the film and includes important pieces of paperwork such as release forms and location scouting. This folder is submitted with a short trailer for your film and is worth 30% of your overall mark, as the film makes up the rest.

The pros of this module are: by the end of the process you have a finished product which you can add to your showreel, you learn a lot of new skills on set, working with new people can be fun and engaging as ideas of how to make the film can be formed over casual conversations, you can be as creative as you want as you’re writing the script, and it’s another chance to explore the technical role you’re most interested in, whether that be editing, writing or directing!  

However, this module does have cons, one of which is that it’s based on group work and some people in your group may not pull their own weight (an issue I found occurring within my own production) and unfortunately there is no way for you to change that as you can’t force people to work when they do not want to. Additionally, I personally did not find the lectures useful for myself, as I would have prefered to be filming instead of sitting through a lecture about making a film. Finally, it can be a bit of a juggling act with other modules as you have to work on all of them at once, and it’s sometimes hard to find the time to do that. Overall though, this module has taught me a lot about teamwork and what roles I enjoy doing in productions. Because of this production, I realised that I really enjoy directing, which I didn’t know beforehand, which has now led to me being the director of my TV show I am currently creating, so overall it worked out!  


Media Futures: (Optional)
Short version: I didn’t really like this module.

Media Futures involves the study of contemporary media practices, the impact of technology on creative industries, developments in global and local media, and changing paradigms of media production and audience consumption. You will develop a critical awareness of a number of key themes including social experience and shaping of media forms, access, participation and engagement, and the relationship between public and private spheres. By considering these themes through a range of different theories and research, you will discover a variety of approaches to gaining understanding of what is a rapidly expanding frontier of creative and cultural practice and media knowledge.

Long version: As I’ve said before on these posts: “Theory isn’t for everyone, and I am the everyone in this situation.” And that has not changed one bit I am sorry to report, theory is still not my cup of tea. I can appreciate that essays are needed to make the degree legitimate, but at the same time I would much rather be doing practical work in all honesty, as I feel that suits my skill set much more. However, one thing that can be said is that the people teaching this module are passionate about what they are saying.

The module is marked with a 3000-word essay, worth 70% and a group debate, worth 30%. The debate was a good exercise in public speaking which is always a good skill to have no matter where you work. It was also a nice change from essays as what was reached could be used later on to defend your point when someone tries to counteract. Overall all though, I just didn’t really connect with this module as I did with the next one.


Cult Cinema (Optional)
Short version: I loved this module!

Cult Cinema introduces you to films that are often marginalised in academic film discourse as a consequence of their modes of production, content or manner of consumption. The module theoretically explores the interrelated concepts of ‘cult’, ‘trash’ and ‘exploitation’ cinema.

Long version: Okay, so you know I said I didn’t like essays, that still stands, but I did enjoy the lesson. The module is marked on two essays: a 1500 word essay and a 2500 word essay.

 Okay so let’s just jump straight into the Pros: If you enjoy learning about film history, especially the weird side of it, this class is for you! Every week we’d sit and watch weird clips from old films and then analyzes them! And honestly, what other lesson lets you openly talk about all the bad movies you’ve watched free of judgment. Additionally, the teacher is amazing, having Andrea Wright as your teacher is so much fun, as she’s not afraid to throw her class into the deep end when it comes to the weird films made in the past. We also got to do movie quizzes where there were prizes and even if you didn’t win a tub of sweets was always being passed around the class. The biggest con, however, is, of course, the essays. And yes, I may have not written the best essays in that class, but I did have a lot of fun!


I hope you learned something from this post or at least found it interesting. There is a lot of other modules that I have not discussed as unfortunately, you can’t study them all, so please feel free to check out the website for the rest of them. Again thanks for reading, it means a lot to me.
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day: The End of the F***ing World (2017)

My Timetable! – 2nd Year Film and Television Production

For today’s blog post as the title would suggest, I am going to be talking about my timetable. This might seem like an odd thing to do but strangely enough, it’s the type of question I get asked a lot.

“How many days are you in a week?”
“How long are your lessons?”
“Do you have much work to do outside of lessons? “.
So I hope with this blog post I am able to answer some of these questions!
Of course, this timetable is just for my course, Film and Television Production, so other courses will vary. Also feel free to check out my last post to find out more about my course!

(Disclaimer: The timetable alters occasionally from week to week to accommodate coursework deadlines, and in class tests if needed)  

Tuesday: Research for Film and Television

“Research for Film and Television develops your skills in academic research. The module surveys a range of research methods and equips you with the necessary skills to undertake a film and television focused research project.”

9:00: Time to wake up and get ready for the day ahead.
10:30: Walk to lecture with friends, as I live in the town and not on campus, so have to allow walking time.

Inside Creative Edge

11:00 – 1:00: Lecture time ~ This module is purely essay based, so revolves around lectures and seminars. The lectures are all about research methods such as focus groups and surveys, their uses, efficiency and limitations.
2:00: Seminar time ~ This is a time to take a more in-depth look at what we have just studied in lecture, in smaller groups, and ask any questions if needed.
3:00 End of the learning day!

Outside lesson work:
As with every module, you are expected to work outside of class time on your coursework. For this module this means essay work which includes researching, writing essay plans, reading through your notes, conducting research groups and, of course, actually writing the essays themselves.

 


Wednesday: Documentary

“Welcome to the Real World: Documentary Production offers you the opportunity to research, develop and produce a short documentary film that could be considered for submission to a festival or competition or for exhibition over an alternative platform.”


7:30: 
Wake up and get ready.
8:30: Time to walk to uni! Tip: Try to find a group of people you know to walk with, as it’ll make the journey feel a little shorter, this can be flatmates, people on other courses who are in uni the same time as you, or people on your course doing the same module as you or not. It’ll make you feel a lot more social, wake you up more, and prepare you for the day ahead! 
9:00 – 1:00:
 Lecture time ~  The lectures are completely theory and is all about the history of documentary, and what elements are needed to create a good documentary. Additionally, there are practical screening of groups tasks, and group/individual pitches.
1:00: Seminar time ~ This follows straight after the lecture and is a time for production groups to get together and have a group meeting to see where they are at in the production process and plan what they’re going to do next. While all the groups are having their meetings, two lectures go around the groups, finding out what progress the groups have made, give advice accordingly and discuss what the next step of their production should be. 
2:00: End of the learning day!

Outside lesson work:
There is a lot of outside work for this module as it’s very production heavy, which requires you to do a lot of research and planning into your chosen documentary as you have to find the story, interviewees, film it and edit the documentary. There is also deadlines every week for production folder work such as script outlines, filming dates, health and safety forms, rushes, transcriptions etc. Additionally, there is a reflective report (essay) for this module, which counts towards your overall grade.


Thursday: Advanced Post Production

“Advanced Post Production develops your skills of editing and forms the basis your practical and conceptual understanding of digital non-linear editing, using industry standard software.”

8:20: Wake up time!
9:30: Walk to uni with friends.
10:00:
 Seminar time ~ Unlike most of my modules on this course, the lesson layout for advanced post-production differs greatly as the seminar is split into two. The first half is used to teach the class how to do an editing technique. Meanwhile, the second half gives you the time to mess about with it and practice it more, with help on standby if you didn’t grasp it the first time or have any questions about the software.
11:00: Lecture time ~ The lectures are theory based and cover the origins of film editing and movements through the eras.
12:00: Seminar time ~ Back to the editing room to practice the technique we learnt earlier!
1:00: End of the learning day!

Outside lesson work:
Again, there is a lot of outside work to do with this module, as it has both coursework and exam elements. The coursework is a portfolio, which requires a lot of outside class hours to create and perfect. As well as studying of course for the exam.


I hope you enjoyed this post and found it a useful insight into what university timetables can be like, as people assume that it’s similar to high school or sixth form which is not the case, as shown above, there’s a lot more emphasis on independent learning and working outside of class hours. Thanks for reading and I hope you have an amazing week.
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day: Big Fish (2003)

Second Year Film and Television Production: Second Semester Summary!

So here I am again, back talking to you about my modules, however, unlike last time this is all about my second semester of my second year in Film and Television Production!
Technically, today is my last academic day of second year, which is super scary yet exciting at the same time! So quite a bit has changed over this last academic year, and I’ve learnt so much about myself as a person, which I can’t wait to share with you over the next couple of months! Anyway, as I did before in my first-semester post, I will be going through the modules, giving my opinion on each one, enjoy!
(Disclaimer: modules on this course are always changing so might be different or non-existent by the time you’re reading this blog post.)

 


Advanced Post Production: (Optional)
Short version: Great module, however, it’s a lot of work!

“Advanced Post Production develops your skills of editing and forms the basis your practical and conceptual understanding of digital non-linear editing, using industry standard software.”

Long version: As the quote suggests, advanced post-production is all about learning how to edit using premiere pro and the history surrounding editing.
The module is marked in two parts: a portfolio of weekly tasks and an exam.
The exam is made up of content from the module reading list, lectures and practical exercises, and is worth 30% of your overall mark, as the portfolio makes up the rest.
The portfolio is comprised of 5 tasks:

  • Exercise 1 Manipulating Media (10%):  This task is about manipulating pictures using keyframes, creating movement in your images.
  • Exercise 2 Using Keyframes (10%): For this task, you learn to blur a face and must go out and record footage of your own for this piece.
  • Exercise 3 Multicamera Editing (10%): As the excise suggest, you learn how to edit multiple camera feeds together, and you must record your own footage for this task.
  • Exercise 4 Factual Production Techniques (60%): This is the main part of your portfolio and is a 3-minute factual video about any element of editing history you chose to do it on. It must include an interview, a narration, images, video, titles and music.
  • Exercise 5 Audio Dub (10%): For this task, you pick one minute of a three-minute video provided to source all the audio for and edit into the scene.

The pros of taking the module are: the lectures are great allowing you to learn more of the historical side of editing which is super interesting and fun. The seminars are taught in a way which allows you to learn at your own speed without the added pressure of messing up, and allows you to ask questions if you get stuck, which most of the time you won’t need to as the lecturers are great at teaching people how to use the software. Additionally, there is one-on-one support if needed throughout creating your portfolio.

However, this module does have it’s cons, one of which is that you have to record all the footage and audio you use for the task, which can be difficult on times as it can be a bit of a juggling act with other modules as you have to work on all of them at once, and it’s sometimes hard to find the time to do that. Also, you can only edit on campus, which has been an issue for some people I know.

Overall though, this module is a great introduction into editing and it’s techniques. And I have found it an extremely useful skill to have as I have already used the skills I have learnt in this module, in another one of my modules. So I’d highly recommend this one if you’re a budding editor, or just want to try your hand at something new!


Research for Film and Television: (Compulsory)
Short version: I still don’t like this module.

“Research for Film and Television develops your skills in academic research. The module surveys a range of research methods and equips you with the necessary skills to undertake a film and television focused research project.”

Long version: As I stated last time I talked about this module: “Theory isn’t for everyone, and I am the everyone in this situation.” And that has not changed one bit I am sorry to report, theory is still not my cup of tea. I can appreciate that essays are needed to make the degree legitimate, but at the same time I would much rather be doing practical work in all honesty, as I feel that suits my skill set much more. Essay wise, I’m still not very interested in this module as it’s veered quite a bit away from film and more into different methods of research, which is great if you enjoy sociology, but I would much rather be analysing films.

On a happier note, this module has taught me one very important thing which is I am not the type of person who is suited to do a dissertation, it’s just not for me, which I’m super happy I’ve found out now. As sometimes it’s nice to find out your weaknesses as it helps you find out what your strengths are. Because of this, I will not be doing a dissertation in my third year and instead will be taking two modules in it’s place! (Speaking about third-year modules, I’m planning on writing a ‘First impressions’ post, next month about the modules I’ve chosen and what I hope to learn from them, so keep an eye out for that!)


Documentary (Optional)
Short version: Love the idea of it, however practically it can be a bit messy.

“Welcome to the Real World: Documentary Production offers you the opportunity to research, develop and produce a short documentary film that could be considered for submission to a festival or competition or for exhibition over an alternative platform.”

Long version: Documentary has been a real whirlwind of a module. It’s been jam-
packed from start to finish
, and stressful on times. But overall, I’m glad that I chose this module. It didn’t sugar coat anything and taught me how to deal with issues as they arise.

The main part of the coursework for this module is a 3 – 5 minute documentary around the theme “What matters?”. For this, I chose to create a documentary about autism which was really interesting to film!
Additionally, there were a couple of filming exercises, one of which was a one-minute stills documentary, which you have to write about in a reflective report (essay).
The pros of taking this module are: you get to research and learn more about the topic you’ve chosen to create a documentary about which is really interesting. Making the documentary itself, as at the end of the process you can add it to your showreel and hopefully be proud of it. And finally, it’s a chance to experiment with a new art form as making a documentary is very different than making a normal scripted film.

The cons however of taking documentary is that the module is very group work heavy, so teamwork is an issue on times if everyone isn’t working efficiency. Deadlines can stress you out and can creep up on you, as there is a lot to plan and organise. And finally, as I said before, it can be a juggling act with other modules on times as the module demands a lot of you, especially as I’m the director in my group. Overall, this module is rewarding if you love documentaries as much as I do, as you need to be motivated and prepared to put the hours in, as all the work and stress is totally worth it when you have the finished product in your hand!


I hope you learned something from this post or at least found it interesting. There is a lot
of other modules that I have not discussed as unfortunately, you can’t study them all, so please feel free to check out the website for the rest of them.
Again thanks for reading and following me through this academic year, it means a lot to me! I’m currently writing a post about my academic timetable as I get asked a lot about how many hours I have to be on campus for each week, so stayed tuned for that!
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day: Pleasantville (1998)

My Experience with Vibe Radio

As many of you know by now, I partake in quite a few things at the uni, one of which I’ll be sharing with you today, which is Vibe Radio.


For those of you who don’t know, Edge Hill have their own radio station which is part of
Vibe media, and in my first year I produced a radio show with three of my friends called ‘Reel Talk’. Our show was two hours of soundtracks, quizzes, and conversations about movies and tv shows, which was super fun. Our weekly show was hosted by myself and my friend Emma, and each week had a theme e.g action, romance, horror, etc.   


Secret Santa gifts which we opened on air.

One of the best parts about the radio show is that you can play and do pretty much whatever you want as long as it’s not offensive. This made the experience of writing the weekly script/schedule for the show fun as we could be as creative as we wanted with it. Additionally, anyone can have a radio show, regardless of your course, as long as you’ve signed up for Vibe, you’re good to go!


Posing with the Mayor.

My favourite part of doing the radio show though was when we were given the opportunity to host a charity fun run at the uni. When we volunteered to host the event we didn’t really know what to expect, just that we needed to create a playlist of songs, however, when we got there and got handed the mics, we found out a lot more was required of us.
Our job for the whole event was to cheer people on while also playing DJ, which was so much fun as we ended up having jokes with the runners who came in, and with the spectators. Also, we met the mayor of west Lancashire which was pretty cool.


However the best moment of the day happened near the end of the event. Everyone thought the last runner had gone through and everyone was packing things away and going home, until one of the organisers came over to us and inform us that one person had yet to finish the race. So we waited for this one runner to make it to the end, which felt so long. Just looking over the empty running track while listening to ‘We Are the Champion’, wondering if this lost runner was ever going to find their way back, when suddenly we saw them. As they slowly made their way to the end of the race with myself and Emma’s support, we jumped onto the track so they wouldn’t finish the race alone. And that is how I ended up running a marathon, and I still have the medal to this day.


So if there is anything to take away from this post, it’s that: Vibe radio is pretty cool and worth a try if you’re interested in podcasts or anything such as that and to take every opportunity that gets thrown at you as you might accidentally end up running a marathon event at the end of it all.
I hope you all have an amazing week,
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day: The Room (2003) 

Second Year Film and Television Production: First Semester Summary!

So here it is. Here are my thoughts on my first semester of my second year in Film and Television Production! A bit late I know, but you know what they say, ‘better late than never’. As I did before in my first-year summary post, I will be going through the modules, giving my opinion on each one, enjoy!  
(Disclaimer: modules on this course are always changing so might be different or non-existent by the time you’re reading this blog post.)


Genre Filmmaking: (Optional)  
Short version: The module was good, the teamwork side of it not so much.

Genre Filmmaking develops your knowledge and experience of the technical, creative, organisational and practical demands involved in genre film production. The overarching theme of the module is the development of the creative processes in relation to genre. Genre filmmaking gives you the opportunity to test out ideas or tell a story within the boundaries of generic conventions. In addition, you will need to think critically about genre in the context of your production.

Long version: I have mixed opinions on this module, as I somewhat liked it in places, but

A screenshot from my film.

I did find it stressful in places due to the heavy focus on teamwork, because if members of your group don’t want to work, you’ve got to do their share of the work in most cases, which unfortunately happened a lot to me.
For this module, there is two pieces of coursework: a 10-minute group pitch and a 5-minute film with all the required paperwork. The pitch went really well overall, as you can get extra marks for being theatrical, so my group dressed up as the victims from our comedy/horror film, with fake blood and all.
The film, on the other hand, had many complications tied to it, as the footage shot had many errors with it, so it made my job of editing it needlessly stressful. But with everything said and done, the film got a first, so overall there’s a happy ending to this story.


Analysing Film and Television: (Compulsory)
Short version: I don’t really like this module.

“Analysing Film and Television develops your skills in the close analysis of film and television. The module surveys a range of critical approaches to the study of film and television institutions, texts and audiences. You will gain the skills necessary to develop and undertake analysis as part of a film and/or television research project.”

Creative Edge lecture theatre.

Long version: Theory isn’t for everyone, and I am the everyone in this situation. This isn’t the first time I’ve studied films in this way, my whole media A Level comprised of this sort of analysis. But for some reason this time I wasn’t very engaged, which could mostly be down to the fact that I’m a very hands-on sort of worker, I like to have a finished product at the end of it all I can be proud of. Unfortunately, most people on my course also seem to struggle with this theory module because just like me, they’re very practical. And the whole module is marked on essays.
On a happier note, I got to learn more about the male gaze and studies around this topic, which I loved, as I find it interesting to learn about the representation of women in the media industry, as spoilers: it can be very phallocentric (all about men) on times. Which hopefully will change, one woman at a time!  


Screenwriting: (Optional)
Short version: I loved this module!  

Screenwriting develop your understanding of the theory and craft of screenwriting and will include consideration of story, narrative structure, character, setting, dialogue, original screenplay and adaptation.  The module enables you to demonstrate your creative potential via the development of and reflection on their ideas and scripts.”

Long version: Okay where do I begin. First off I’m an aspiring screenwriter, making this module a big must when it came to picking modules. However, I didn’t know how much this module would impact my writing.
There is two pieces of coursework you are marked on for this module which is a 3-minute pitch about the script you plan to write, and the finished script with development materials (log line, character biographies, etc).
When I heard that we had to pitch in front of the whole class I was not happy, as I sometimes struggle to talk in front of crowds, but what made it worse was the fact that we couldn’t have a powerpoint and it had to all my memorised, I’m terrible at that. However, against all odds, I did one of the best pitches in my course, which is honestly crazy to me. Which goes to show that a lot of preparation and rehearsing of these types of things always helps. And now my fear of pitching has dropped by quite a bit, I still get butterflies, but that’s natural and actually helps me to do my best.  
So now that’s out of the way all I had to do was write the script, which I loved doing, once I was on a roll there was no stopping me, which was part of the issue. I wrote 16 pages, for a 10-page script… so that took a lot of editing down.
But I can honestly say I’ve taken four key things away from this module:

  1. How to format a script, as I kinda knew, but not to a professional standard.
  2. Short films don’t have to be complex, as most great short films are one place, one time.
  3. Only keep what is crucial to the story when writing short films – waffling can occur on times when you’re writing without you even realising it, so is something you have to keep an eye on when editing!  
  4. And finally, I learned that it’s best to follow what you think is right than what other people think sometimes. I was headstrong with my idea and it paid off, I took on people’s critics and changed when needed, but never compromised on what I wanted. Which is probably why I got a first overall for this module, who knows.But to summarise: screenwriting is an awesome module if you love to write and want to turn that love into a skill!

I hope you learned something from this post or at least found it interesting. There is a lot of other modules that I have not discussed as unfortunately, you can’t study them all, so please feel free to check out the website for the rest of them. I’m currently studying documentary and advanced post-production, so stay tuned for that post!
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day: Planet Earth II (2016-)

Employability Week!

It’s finally reading/employability week on campus!
For those of you who don’t know, reading week is a week for students to catch up on their essays/coursework/readings and to somewhat relax. However, for media students, it’s all about employability, with three days full of activities, workshops, and sessions. In this blog post, I will be discussing the type of session/workshops that are being offered across all the academic years of the media courses, as these sessions are held a couple times a year.  


Monday’s session
Dissertation workshop
This session is aimed at 2nd-year film and television production students to help them choose whether to do a dissertation or not, as it is optional. You can either choose to do one dissertation or two theory modules.This is super useful for anyone who is still undecided or wants more information on this topic!

Working in freelance
Most people working in the media industry, tend to work freelance: moving from job to job, and company to company. So it’s a great chance to learn about the exciting, challenging world of freelance and the key elements required to help you set yourself up as a freelancer. Which is a great skill to know.

Setting yourself up as a freelancer
Practical advice from experts on becoming a freelancer.
This is one-to-one experience where you can ask individual questions and get advice on how to set yourself up. Brilliant for people who are planning on working in the media industry and getting closer to graduation.

Study skills: Finding academic information for your assignments
Studying experts from learning services are on hand to enable you to develop the skills needed to reach for your assignments. Super useful for anyone who writes essays. Even more useful if you’re considering doing a dissertation/currently are writing one.  

Pitching event
Hosted by Derek Murray, this session gives us a chance to pitch our own original idea to receive feedback on.


Tuesday’s session
Careers planning: essential skills for employment right now
What have you got and what are you missing? It’s important to know what skills make you employable, as you may have skills you don’t even realise employers look for!

Career planning making your job application stand out this summer
It’s time to start thinking about how you can make the summer count jobwise! Whether that’s getting cash or building your skillset up. This session will help to focus your plans and make your application stand out amongst the others.

Postgraduate study at Edge Hill
Rachel Buckley and Andrea Wright are hosting this session for any student interested in pursuing a postgraduate degree in the media department. Bring your questions about studying a higher level!


Study skills: academic writing workshop
This session gives you advice and guidance on bringing out the academic writing skills you already have.

Study skills improving your grammar & proof-reading
An essential part of getting your message across when writing is clear and precise sentence structure. And often it’s grammar and spelling that prevent your message from getting across, so this is the ideal opportunity to properly concentrate just on that!


Wednesday’s session
Postgraduate certificate & teaching
If you’re interested in acquiring a qualification that may lead to a career in teaching, then this session if for you! Find out what the PG certificate entails and bring your questions along for a very informative event!

Studying abroad
This session is for students from years 1 and 2, to learn about opportunities there may be for studying outside of the UK.

Module choices
Additionally, there are module choices sessions for both 
film studies, and film and television production students, for years 1 and 2. 


As you can see, there’s a lot on offer this employability week in terms of sessions. Although there are no guest speakers as there usually is, there’s still a lot out there to interest you, so if you’re a media student who finds yourself free on campus, make sure to check some of these sessions out!
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day:  The Lobster (2015)

The Label Recordings

One thing I’ll always love about Edge Hill is the opportunities it creates, one of which is the student record label, “The Label Recordings”. Which is a non-profit organisation, run by Carl Hunter (bassist for ‘The Farm’) and Clare Henley, who are also media lecturers at the uni. The organisation specialises in helping local unsigned indie artists by producing their music, videos, and getting their singles to radio stations. You may be asking yourself where you’d find yourself at the label. Personally, I am a runner and editor for the label and have been for over a year now. However, there is a variety of roles from camera operator to graphic designer.


My experience with the record label has been a strange but fascinating one, which I wish to highlight a few moments for you in this post in the hopes that you reading may find yourself a new extracurricular activity, as it’s been a great experience, not just cv wise, but in general as the things you can potentially learn while on set will help you later in any industry you wish to go in, as creativity and time management is always a must.

Psycho Disco Face single cover art

The first job I had with the label was a runner on the set of Oranj Son‘s ‘Psycho Disco Face‘ music video, which involved myself, and a group of fellow students running through a forest holding poles, with massive papier-mâché heads on the end of them, while someone ran after us with an iPad filming it. The Label is incredible fun. And since then I have been a main part in everything the label produces, including one of the label’s more recent band ‘Youth Hostel‘.


Youth Hostel is the first band on the label who I have followed from the very start, from filming their promo in Parr Street studio, to editing their final music video, to seeing them rise to success at Liverpool Sound City, which has been a joy to see.  

To summarise, take every opportunity that the university makes available, even if that might include running through a forest holding a pole with a papier-mâché head on it.


If you know any student bands who would like to be featured on the record label, feel free to post your submission to the Facebook page! For more information on the label, please check out their blog.
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day: Spirited Away (2001)

Hi Edge Hill!

Hey there, welcome to my first official Edge Hill blog post!
I’m so excited to start blogging here and giving you an insight of what my student experience is like here. A good idea however before I start would be an introduction, so here I go.
Hi, I’m Charley, a second year Film and Television Production Student who lives in a student home in Ormskirk. (Phew, that’s out of the way.)  

Edge Hill hosts a variety of courses and has the facilities to prove it. However, you’ll usually find me in Creative Edge (as that’s where my course is based), in one of the editing suites as I’m an aspiring editor.

The Hub on the other hand, is one of my favourite spots to go on campus, mostly because of the shop and the mini market they usually have on. But most importantly when events are held there such as freshers fair, the hub comes alive and there’s a buzzing atmosphere in the air, and a chance to grab freebies always helps.    

Speaking of freshers fair, that’s where you can sign up for a variety of societies, which Edge Hill has a lot of. I myself am President of Disney society, editor for Vibe Media, editor/ runner for the Label Recordings and part of the Raising and Giving society. However there’s a massive range of societies to choose from if those don’t take your fancy, from Anime to Rock Climbing, there’s a lot on offer. As well as having the ability to create a society, if acceptable, from one of your hobbies or interest, but that’s a blog post for a different time.

Inside the Art Centre

And finally there is the Arts Centre if you like open mic nights, live performers and pizza, this is the place for you. The reason I go there though is for ‘Free Film Friday’. As you can guess by the title the Art Centre most weeks screen new releases of films in their cinema, which is free for all students, which is great for all you media buffs out there and perfect for a free night out of the flat.

Thank you for reading my first post, I can’t wait to tell you more about Edge Hill and what it has to offer in future posts!
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day: Black Mirror (2011-)

Make 2016 a Year You Want to Travel Back to! :D

So we’re in the second week of 2016 now and I hope everyone is enjoying the new year. Something which I find fascinating is how the world, in unison join together to set their year goals. This could be to lose weight, eat healthier or just try something new and out of the blue. It’s an interesting time of year for everyone around the world. What goals have you set?

With the theme of the new year I have decided to come up with some things that you could try this year to ensure you have the best year imaginable.

My first suggestion, being for those who want to reminisce the whole year once its finished. Why not use an old jar and every day, fill it with a memory. When December 31st comes back around you will be able to pick out old memories from the year.

memory-jar-2

If you’re too ahead of times and prefer your technology over good old-fashioned pen and paper you could always create a second snap chat account. Using your main account send snaps to your new one. At the end of the year you will have a years worth of stories to watch.

One day, maybe in our lifetimes, time travel might be  possible. Make 2016 a year you want to travel back to.

Something that I have always wanted to do is be a representative for Camp America. This is basically travelling to America for the summer and working with different people running activities with other ‘Camp Councillors’. This, following on from last weeks blog is a perfect way of making your CV stand out from the pile and better yet you’ll be making life long memories. Whether you’re a student studying at Edge Hill now or a potential student arriving in September this could be a perfect way to make that extra bit of money over the summer and have an amazing time do so.

Camp-America

So far this year I have finally seen the inside of a gym (it wasn’t as bad as I thought) and I guess now that I have started I am going to have to continue with it. The great thing about this university is the newly developed gym on campus, plenty of high-tech equipment and an excellent staff to help with any queries or questions. Whats stopping you from doing any of these things this year?

Why not try:

  • Writing a book
  • Joining a sports team
  • Sky diving
  • Rock climbing
  • Learning an instrument
  • Taking that 3 day holiday to Amsterdam?
  • Spending three days watching pretty little liars…

The possibilities are endless.

So this week we lost an icon that is David Bowie. His music has inspired generation after generation, his films are recognised throughout the industry. He’s an influence to a number of musicians today and probably for many years to come so I thought I would include my favourite song of his.

I hope you all have an amazing day.

J x