Getting to the Football from Edge Hill

If your an avid football fan like myself then wondering how to get down to a game at the weekend might be a question you have pondered already if you are not sure, but don’t worry Edge Hill isn’t that far away from civilization and travel links are readily available.

If you are an Everton fan looking to get to Goodison Park then the train to Liverpool Central will get you there, you can get off at various stops and catch the bus but if you would rather walk then getting off at Kirkdale is your best bet.

Alternatively for both Everton and Liverpool fans the 310 to Liverpool from Ormskirk bus station stops at Oxton Street for Goodison Park, and Woodhouse Close for Anfield, both stops are within walking distance of their respective grounds.

I personally am a Man United fan so I have to go a bit further afield by first getting the train to Liverpool central, walking across to Lime Street, (do not let Merseyrail deceive you, Liverpool Central and Liverpool Lime Street are five minutes walk apart contrary to information I keep finding when planning my journey which lists the distance as a 40 minute walk.) I then go from Lime street to Manchester Piccadilly and then finally getting a tram down to the ground. This altogether would cost around £20 return but you can save money with a railcard which would bring the price to around £14/15 instead.  Regardless of who you support Liverpool Lime Street or Preston train station will usually be your main points of travel if going further afield.

It’s also important to keep in mind when the last buses and trains back are, I know the last train from Liverpool into Ormskirk is usually around half 12, i’m not sure about buses. Either way travel to grounds is accessible as long as you know how and plan accordingly, till next time!

Jordan

Places to Visit while at Uni

Although some people attending Edge Hill may be locals, and already know the way around Liverpool and the surrounding areas, there will be some people, who, like me, aren’t local at all and have never visited the area before. If that’s you, or you are local but are looking for inspiration on where to take a day out, then this list is for you.

1- Liverpool

At just a 30 minute train journey from Ormskirk, visiting Liverpool is a must. As someone whose only other big city experience before coming to uni was London, I didn’t really know what I was doing or where I was going when I first visited Liverpool, but I was presently surprised. Liverpool is essentially a smaller, friendlier London- complete with its own share of shops, theatres, and places to eat- not to mention its rich history in music.  And most importantly (for some!), lots of good places to enjoy a night out.

2- Blackpool

In the first flat I was in, I was lucky enough to be sharing with people who were locals, and had access to cars, which meant we got to take a lovely day trip to Blackpool one weekend. We did all the things you’re supposed to do when in a seaside town- we ate fish and chips, went in the biggest arcade we could find, and walked up and down the pier. As Blackpool is a big tourist destination, there are also other things on offer to do, and we decided to take the walk around Madame Tussaurd’s that afternoon, at only £10 each for us students! It was well worth the money and we all had a lot of fun.

3- Manchester’s Hope Mill Theatre

Being on a Performing Arts course, I was naturally exposed to more theatre than most, but one of the venues that really stood out to me was Hope Mill. We visited twice in the year, once to see Pippin, and the other to see Little Women, both fantastic musicals. The theatre itself is always impeccably decorated and the bar is themed to the show that is taking place at that point in time. The bar area does amazing drinks and food, so even if you’re not into theatre, the you can still enjoy some time there.

Public Lectures, Research Seminars and More!

Throughout the year, Edge Hill University hosts a number of public lectures. These are can be in subjects such as my own, Biological Sciences, or others, such as Education or History.

Banded archerfish (Toxotes jaculatrix). Lithograph, published in 1884.

Recently, my personal tutor and department head of biology, Dr Paul Ashton, gave his inaugural lecture titled “Contemplate an Entangled Bank” after the opening to the final paragraph of Darwin’s On the Origin of Species. Paul’s lecture was on the culmination of his work to date, from lime trees to sedges.

The Biosciences Department also hosts research seminars typically at lunchtime, as well as public lectures in the evening. Previous research seminars from this term were on biogeography (the origin of the Lusitanian flora), a rare genetic disease (Fanconi Anaemia), and how plant-atmosphere interactions shine a light on the origin of flowering plants. Although the schedule for 2018’s public lectures is not yet released, check back HERE for details! I attended Dr André Antunes’ talk, “Living on the Edge: Life in high salinity environments” last year and thoroughly enjoyed it. Also of note for the department is “ENTO’18: The Good The Bad and the Ugly” – an annual entomological conference which this year is being hosted at Edge Hill University during the 29th to the 31st of August.

The Geography department also holds public lectures in the Geosciences building, the most recent two being a lecture on coastal vulnerability to climate change and rising sea-levels, and perceptions of “Globalisation, Sustainability and Culture” in regard to “the Identities of old/new Empires and their colonies.”

Conferences and talks are held by the Faculty of Health and Social Care in their own building, as well as the Tech Hub and the Manchester campus – particularly for open days, where the Operating Department Practice programme is held. Conferences are also held by the faculty, such as the Digital Ecosystem event.

Education students have an interesting research seminar scheduled for early 2018 on January 11th – The Teaching and Learning of Britishness and Fundamental British Values, by Dr Sadia Habib, who has also published a book on the topic. Past seminars and lectures have included teaching in South Africa, lesson study, and educational responses for the future.

The Department of Performing Arts also has had many events throughout the year, two workshops of which were on Mindfulness and Butoh in Dance Movement Therapy. Another inaugural lecture was held by Professor Stephen Davismoon earlier this month.

Finally, students of English, History and Creative Writing have enjoyed lectures on The Politics of the Neo-Victorian Freak Show, how the illustrations of Sherlock Holmes affected the success of Doyle’s success, and “what it meant to be a girl in the late Victorian period and how women editors played a role in shaping the modern girl,” in a paper reading by Dr Beth Rodgers.

As you can see, Edge Hill University offers numerous lectures across the board of courses! I’ve found that attending these talks for my subject has allowed me to get an idea of which topics I find enjoyable both inside and outside the curriculum.

The Warehouse Project, Prodigy Style

The Warehouse Project is a series of club nights within a warehouse in Manchester where a mixture of artists performs at each event. Last Friday I went for the first time and I saw The Prodigy and Jaguar Skills amongst other artists and DJs that I didn’t know but really enjoyed.

Setlist

For anyone who isn’t into that kind of music I would still recommend that they give events like this a chance. In my own time I rarely listen to dance or drum and bass, preferring to listen to rock and indie, but I find that events like this aren’t just for fans of a particular genre; they’re for music fans in general.

From my experience, anybody who likes music festivals and nights out would fit in well at The Warehouse Project; everyone was really friendly, united in their love of the music, and the atmosphere was great. As we waited for each act I could feel the excitement building in the crowd. I think anyone who’s into that kind of music, thinks that they may enjoy that kind of scene, or just wants to try something new should make the trip.

Me and my best friend waiting for The Prodigy to come on
Me and my best friend waiting for The Prodigy to come on

From Ormskirk Station to Trafford Park or Deansgate it will take a little over an hour, and then a taxi will cost around £4 from either of those stations to the venue. Alternatively, if there’s a designated driver in the group it’s an easy drive. The taxi home can be quite expensive, so it might be a better idea to book a hotel and to get the train back in the morning. There is a Premier Inn a five minute walk away and a youth hostel a ten minute taxi ride away.

I really loved The Warehouse Project and hope to attend again soon. The Prodigy were incredible and really reminded me why I love live music. Unfortunately, I’m a little too short to have seen much of what was happening on stage, but I still had a brilliant time dancing and singing along. It was a really great way to end my first semester at university.

Prodigycrowd