Kitchen Packing: Tricks and Tips.

Everyone talks about what you should be packing for your bedroom at university. Whether on-campus accommodation or off-campus accommodation. I’m guilty of this too. However, one of the important topics that gets glazed over is what you pack for your kitchen. Therefore, this week my blog is going to revolve around that all-important kitchen packing list.

The best way to give credible recommendations is to explore the mistakes I made when packing.

All my kitchen stuff on the day I moved into my Chancellors Court at EHU.

In EHU accommodation, more often than not you’ll get one cupboard in the kitchen for all your stuff, which is tiered into two sections by a shelf. Therefore, do not make the mistake I made and pack a colander, it will take up too much space in your cupboard. I’d recommend a sieve for all your drainage needs, because then you also have something for baking! Also, it’s likely to be a lot cheaper of a purchase.

Another mistake I made was taking too many plates and dishes, realistically I’d say you’d only need two of each if you’re on top of your washing up like I was during first-year.

Onto recommendations rather than mistakes! Buy some kitchen foil and keep stocked up on your kitchen foil. You can use the foil to wrap up leftover food like pizza for your fridge, but also put it on your baking trays to save on washing up. For £3 every few weeks, you can save a lot of time, leftover food, and space in your fridge since wrapping something in foil is more space effective than putting it in plastic boxes (Something I often did).

Even if you’re apprehensive on if you’d use them or not, I suggest packing a measuring jug, mixing bowl, some kind of tin to bake with. Anything you don’t use can just be stored beneath your bed. I didn’t have the desire to bake until Christmas came around, so I was thankful I had a mixing bowl and a nice little square baking tin to use. Besides, baking is a good way to score brownie points with your flatmates (The pun there is very intentional).

Overall it’s better to pack light on your kitchen utensils and so on, you’ll most likely want the extra space in your car for clothes when moving to uni if you’re anything like me!

Alice.

Revisiting My Packing List.

A few weeks ago my blog post talked about moving out of university accommodation, now as I sit here a few weeks later, it’s time to begin thinking about my packing list for second-year. This blog will hopefully serve to inform upcoming first-years of what I took to university, and also an inspiration for any other readers to consider what their lists might look like for when we go back to university in October.

First and foremost, my packing list for first-year featured a lot of leisure reading books, which on paper is great, but in practice, I probably only needed one book, not my entire Gillian Flynn collection and my entire Vogue collection (My reading is very diverse as you can see). Pick a book you know is easy to read or one you’ve been dying to read and add that to your packing list, at Christmas, you can swap it out, or if you haven’t touched it at all, there’s no harm in taking it home and not replacing it. For myself, I barely touched my books, but read a lot of my Vogue magazines, so for second-year, I’m most likely going to pack those again.

My excessive bookshelf.

Another thing I took too much of was kitchenware. Having doubles of your plates, and cutlery is a good idea, but you don’t need three, or even four, of each like I did. The cupboards in the kitchens are generously sized, but you will fill them up quickly. In place of excessive kitchenware, I recommend Tupperware or other plastic boxes to store excess food, it’ll help you portion control, but also means you don’t need to cook daily. For second-year, I’m planning to only take doubles of my basic kitchenware items to free up space.

In a previous blog I’ve discussed video game consoles, but to add onto that I strongly also recommend a firestick or other streaming device in your packing list, I bought one during my second week of uni, though if you take a PS4 or Xbox One, both those consoles have the streaming capabilities of a firestick so you may find you’re better picking one or the other. I plan to take my PS4 to uni’ in October, so may end up leaving my firestick at home.

Beyond those suggestions, the basics still apply. You’ll want to make sure you pack toiletries, stationery, a few notepads, very basic items you would’ve used at home daily or in your studies at college or sixth form. Your packing list will look very different to other’s in some areas, and that’s ok. The point of a packing list for university is to ensure you take items you need, but also take items that provide your comforts. Your new friends might be avid readers, while you only took one book, so its wise to never use one list you see online as gospel. For second, or even third-years, it’s important to reflect on what you took the year prior and realise what you didn’t use a lot, you’ll thank me for that suggestion when you need to move out again at the end of the academic year.

Alice.

What To Bring To Halls

Deciding what to take to university may seem like an overwhelming task and you may ask yourself many questions: How many socks are too many socks? Will I ever use this piece of kitchenware? Are you sure I can’t bring my dog/cat/fish/bird/etc??? The answers are: You can never have too many socks; No, you will not; I wish you could bring a pet, but we’re sure you can’t 🙁 But in all seriousness, here’s my advice, anything too big or inexpensive can be bought locally – don’t bother with the hassle of transporting an inconvenient number of things when you can just buy it from Ormskirk or even Liverpool.

Kitchenware is something that you’ll need but will undoubtedly end up having too much of. Since you’ll be sharing space with a number of other students, you could organise yourselves to buy only the right amount of cutlery, pans, etc. This is easy if you communicate and set up a groupchat on facebook via halls pages when they are set up for you in the summer. Basics here include: cutlery, kitchen knives, chopping boards, small oven tray, glasses, mugs, plates, bowls, saucepans – maybe a wok or a frying pan (both come in handy), also tupperware is useful too (but can be acquired through ordering takeout!)

A room in the Back Halls accommodation

Bedding such as your duvet, mattress protector, pillow(s), and sheets are essential. If you’re from the south then you may think you won’t be able to bear the cold winter ahead of you and be tempted to buy a high tog duvet – don’t. I found the halls to be well insulated and heated, but if you do find yourself cold, you can always buy a blanket – which will liven up your room and make you feel at home anyway! Other bedroom supplies include a doorstop (to make your time at uni just a bit more social), a laundry basket (or you could just use one of those big IKEA bags and save yourself the time it takes for you to inevitably transfer your clothes over), and a clothes horse/airer. You won’t need to bring a TV if you get into Chancellors, Graduates, Founders or Palatine, since they have TVs in the rooms (you’ll need your own TV licence for watching live shows though) but if you want to bring a TV to any other hall, don’t bring a big one – it’ll be too big for a university room anyway.

Chancellors Court

When it comes to clothes, it’s really a matter of opinion. You need casual clothes for lounging and everyday life, at least one smart outfit for formal occasions, and nice clothes for going out or if you just feel like putting extra effort in one day! The British weather is forever fickle, so be prepared, and you’ll be fine. Bring as much underwear and socks for a week, two – max. This will set how often you have to do laundry, although if you have an en-suite then you could just do them in the sink by hand – saves a lot of money and is convenient. For the bathroom, you’ll need your regular toiletries, as well as at least one towel. Again, if you have an en-suite then a small bin is useful to have too.

Finally, considering you’re going to university to study, you’ll probably need some stationery supplies too! Apart from the usual stuff, I found a binder with dividers was helpful during revision.

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