Sean’s Random Encounters – Welcome Sunday 2018


Working on Welcome Sunday 2018 as a member of the Campus Life team gave me the opportunity to talk to many of the incoming first years at the university. You would think that this blog would be about freshers moving into halls. Or even a 3rd year returning to a new style townhouse in Woodland Court. But I have a much more interesting person in mind for this month’s edition of random encounters. Michael the student helper.


Image result for edge hill welcome sundayOn Welcome Sunday you will see about 40 or so students running around wearing yellow high visibility vests. Michael was one of these ‘student helpers’. He had given up the last Sunday of his summer to help students move into their on campus accommodation. I had the chance to ask him why.


Image result for edge hill welcome sunday‘I like helping people and I know it was hard for me to start out, so I want to put a smile on someone’s face.’ was the reply when asked why he wanted to work on this stress filled day. He also had no complaints about helping move boxes up and down stairs. ‘Someone did it for me, and i’m doing for them. Circle of life!’


As I thought about the day itself I realised that the student helpers around me were not tired, stressed or burnt out. They were smiling. These people had just spent a full day helping people move into their new homes and it gave most of them a sense of good karma. People like to help other people, and I honestly can say that the people that study, work and volunteer at Edge Hill University are some of the most helpful that I have ever met. The people make the place.


If you want to read more about Welcome Sunday check out my other blog here:

3 Tips for moving to Edge Hill University – Getting ready for Welcome Sunday



That’s all I have for you on this edition of random encounters but if you want to find out more about what to expect on campus you can check out Campus Life at EHU here. And please leave any questions you have for moving in below. You will get a personal response, fast.

And if you want more free and great information email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Welcome Sunday advice

Hi everyone 🙂

Moving to university can be a really scary and daunting prospect, but it can also be really exciting and later become a really fond memory. I can’t believe it’s been two years since I was moving onto campus, I was so nervous and worried and I ended up having one of the best weeks ever so I thought I could share with you some top tips for welcome Sunday which is now only two weeks away!!

1. Try to be yourself and not too reserved.

I am defitnely extremely shy around new people and this was something I found quite hard as it takes me a bit of time to come out of my shell. But if you just be yourself you will ease into uni life so easily and making friends will be a piece of cake!

2. Don’t hide in your room

Everyone is going to be nervous as you are all in the same boat, one thing I did was keep my bedroom door open all day so that when people passed my room they usually peeked into my room and we ended up chatting so it’s a great way to be social and make friends with your new flat mates!

3. Attend freshers events with your flat mates.

doing this will help break the ice and it will give you all something to bond over as you will all begin to make memories with each other! You are only fresher once so make the most of it!

4. Help someone who seems upset/homesick

The move to uni can be an upsetting time for some people as a lot us have never really been away from home before so if you see someone in your flat or anywhere who seems a little lost or upset it’s a great idea to go and talk to hem and help them feel more settled!

I hope these tips helped and if you are energies about welcome Sunday try not to worry too much as I’m sure you will all have the best time!

Ellie 🙂

Living in Halls

Hi guys!  During my first year of university, I lived in Founders Court. I miss living in halls for many reasons. Here are a few reasons why…

  1. You have the chance to meet new people

Living with strangers can be a scary prospect… but I assure you, you will all get chatting in no time on welcome Sunday! Meeting new people will allow you to make new contacts and form close friendships.

  1. Personalise your new room

A new home means a new place to decorate! During welcome week, there will be a couple of ‘crafternoon’ sessions where you can create your own decorations to make your room that bit more homey. This is where you can personalise a mug, craft a wall hanging or make a sign for your door.

  1. The perfect location

Living on campus made it so easy to roll out of bed in the morning to make it to your 9am lecture. Not only is it handy to attend your lectures and seminars, everything happens on campus including university events, society meet-ups, social nights, barbeques, quizzes, karaoke and sporting events. Although living in a house has its own perks, I definitely miss being in the central buzz of Edge Hill (not that I’m far away… just a 15 minute walk!).

  1. The library

Being on campus also made it so easy to visit the library, whether it is to take out some books, use their computers or do some work. This year the new library is complete in the Catalyst building… which I am very excited to see! You can read more about the new facilities here. Some people work best at home, whereas the library is the best place for others. Personally, it definitely helps me to concentrate on my assignments without any distractions!

I hope you are feeling buzzed for your first week at Edge Hill University. Have you started to read ‘Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine’ in your welcome pack?

Speak soon, Anna 🙂

 

Changes at EHU in a Year

It’s been over a year since I was last properly on Edge Hills Ormskirk campus – with an ERASMUS+ internship occupying my summer and a sandwich year in Chicago from then onwards, I haven’t been able to observe the changes happening day to day. Now that I’m back, the changes really stand out!

Although I saw the Tech Hub being erected throughout my second year, it was not fully completed by the time I left last May. The lab on the top floor dedicated to biosciences wasn’t in full working order. Now that I am back and working an internship for Dr Paul Ashton over the summer, I’ve got to see first-hand what the new biosciences lab is like. I knew it was going to be big, but it’s also comfortably sized and open plan. Benches are neatly arranged in groups of four, two seats on each side. I’m looking forward to working there more as my internship progresses, and as I undertake my dissertation in the coming year.

Another addition to campus is Woodland Court, a new set of accommodation solely for 3rd year (senior undergraduate) students. I’ve heard it’s some of the best value for money accommodation in Ormskirk, as there is currently no summer retainer, costs £119-£124 per week for 40 weeks, includes utility bills, features en-suite accommodation, and has a washing machine in each cluster’s shared area. I’ll have the opportunity to check them out next year, as I’ll be moving back on campus! Woodland Court is set into townhouses from A-R and has 182 rooms. They match the aesthetic of the other newest halls: Chancellors, Founders, Graduates, and Palatine.

Very soon to be completed is the new Catalyst building. The Catalyst will house the new library on campus as well as Careers and Student Services. It’s situated right next to Woodland Court and also will provide 30 bookable rooms for students to use, 50% more than previously! In preparation for its completion, 502 books were passed from the old library to the new in a human book chain.

Importance Of Attending An Open Day

I’ve blogged before about open days and briefly mentioned how it cemented my decision to come and study at Edge Hill University. Now that open days are coming around again, with the first one of the year occurring on June 16th, I thought it time to delve into that a little bit more.

Before I even thought about attending open days, I first had to narrow my choice of university down from All Of Them to just Some Of Them. So, when I was first looking at universities, my process was to start at the top of the university league tables for my course, biology, at thecompleteuniversityguide (other league tables are available) and work my way down, pulling out the universities that were high on the list yet had entry requirements within my predicted range. Next, I looked at the courses in my field offered by these universities and selected the universities that had courses with modules that interested me. This narrowed down my pool of options down from A Lot to A Few – Edge Hill being on that list.

Edge Hill was already fairly high on my list, ranking definitely in the top five based on module options, general location, and rankings alone. What really pushed me to commit to choosing Edge Hill University as my firm choice was attending an open day. If you’re capable of visiting Edge Hill for an open day (or an applicant day if you’re already committed to applying to Edge Hill), then I’d highly recommend it.

Visiting Edge Hill University for an open day allowed me to interact with the department and students first-hand, both of which filled me with hope about the university. The department talk about the course and facilities really showed that they cared about the subject and the people working and studying in their school.

What also comforted me about Edge Hill was Ormskirk, it felt familiar to me despite being a new town far from home. With a direct line to Liverpool, just 30 minutes away, Ormskirk is situated so that it’s its own microcosm but still has access to the wider world via public transport – something that resonated with me upon visiting.

Edge Hill University Halls – 3 more tips to make the most of halls

3 tips for halls


After about a year of living in EHU Halls and Accommodation I figure that it would be worth sharing my experiences in the form of three very important tips about living in these halls to make life easier for you.

Halls is a great way to get your feet beneath you when moving to your new life at University and the campus life team make sure you have plenty of support so if after reading these three tips you still feel unsure please leave a comment and I will get back to you as best I can. But without further delay here is 3 more tips for moving into halls.


1. Schedule:

When you move in you need to understand when and where things are done. Laundry, washing up, cooking, taking out the bins. All of these things need to happen but you must plan when you do them. And remember that the rubbish bins are emptied every day except weekends. If they fill up you gotta take them out yourself!


2. Don’t be afraid of your Campus Connector:

The Campus Connector (previously called Student Assistant)  for your hall is always there to help. These students have training in keep you as happy as possible and that is exactly what they want to do for you. If you feel upset, have a problem or just want to ask a question then don’t be afraid to speak to them.


3. Love your kitchen:

The kitchen is an amazing place. You can cook food and have a party there all at the same time. It’s important that you don’t lock yourself in your room for a year, trust me its not worth it. If you are an introvert it might be hard but going to the kitchen will help you have a great time at university.


That’s all I have for you on moving into your new halls but if you want to find out more about what to expect in halls you can check out this blog here. And please leave any questions you have for moving in below. You will get a personal response, fast.

And if you want more free and great information email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Edge Hill University 1st Year Review – Taking a look back

EHU 1st Year Review


Looking back on my first year I have accomplished a lot. I’ve made friends, had experiences and changed my life forever. In most of my blogs I try to follow the simple strategy of writing about things that I would want to have known when I started. So here is the things that I know now about first year that I wish I had known when I moved in. Hopefully they can relate to you and help someone out there.


Image result for ehu accommodationAccommodation: The accommodation on campus is some of the best I have ever seen. It might be annoying that the windows are child locked so it can get hot, but in the winter it’s amazing. Lots of space, underbed storage and a massive wardrobe.

 


Image result for edge hill campusCampus: Lakes, beaches, rolling hills and grassy parks. Campus ends up a lot more like a fancy holiday resort, the peaceful walks give plenty of places to stroll. I wish that I did more of this in the long evenings before winter set in. Don’t swim in the lakes though, £50 fines!


Image result for edge hill staffStaff: The staff at the university always have an open ear for students. In my first year I didn’t find a single member of staff was was unhelpful, intimidating or impatient. I honestly believe that their TEF Gold award is well deserved and the university is always ensuring that its staff is at the forefront of every project on campus, not to the side.


That’s all from me, but if you want to find out more about EHU and first year then check out my first year blog posts here!

And if you want more free and great information email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Edge Hill Life Hacks – Everyone’s free (to wear sunscreen)

Everybody's free to wear sunscreen

Everybody's free to wear sunscreen


Coming to the end of my first year at Edge Hill University I thought it would be worth while writing a blog as a homage to one of my all time favourite songs and essays. The title of this blog might seem odd if you haven’t heard Baz Luhrmanns “Everybody’s Free (To Wear Sunscreen)”, adapted from Mary Schmich’s column “Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young” – (You can listen here and read here) but here goes anyway.


If I could offer you only one tip for the future, studying would be it would be it. The long-term benefits of studying have been proved by professors, whereas the rest of my advice has no basis more reliable than my own first year experience. I will dispense this advice now.

Enjoy the experience and ease of first year. Oh, never mind. You will not understand the experience of first year until you graduate. But trust me, in 20 years, you’ll look back at photos of yourself and recall in a way you can’t grasp now how much possibility lay before you and how fabulous you really looked. You are not as far behind as you imagine.

Don’t worry about exams. Or worry, but know that worrying is as effective as trying to write a dissertation by chewing bubble gum. The real exams in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind, the kind that blindside you at 8 p.m. before social on Wednesday.

Give something a go every day that scares you.

Karaoke.

Don’t be reckless with other people’s hearts. Don’t put up with people who are reckless with yours. Invest in relationships.

Relax.

Don’t waste your time on social media. Sometimes you’re ahead, sometimes you’re behind. The race is long and, in the end, it’s not on a mobile phone.

Remember firsts you receive. Forget the fails. If you succeed in doing this, tell me how.

Keep your old essays. Throw away your old timetables.

Don’t feel guilty if you don’t know what job you want from your course. The most interesting people I know didn’t know at 22 what they were even studying. Some of the most interesting 40-year-olds are still in classes.

Get plenty of sleep. Be kind to your ears. You’ll miss them when they’re gone.

Don’t expect anyone else to write your reports. Maybe you have a best friend. Maybe you’ll have a smart partner. But you never know when either one might not want to help.

Don’t mess too much with your looks or by the time you’re 40 your dyed blue hair will have fallen out.

Be careful whose classes you take, but be patient with those who teach them. Teaching is a form of nostalgia. Dispensing it is a way of fishing the past from the bin, wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts and recycling it for more than it’s worth.

But trust me on the studying.


 

Dealing with Homesickness

Although many people will try to tell you they don’t miss home, or that they were so busy with new things they didn’t even think about it, it’s very likely that it’s not true.

It’s completely normal to feel homesick at any stage of university life, whether you’ve moved across the country or just a few miles away. Here are a few tips to help overcome it.

1- Talk about it.

It’s very likely, especially in the first few weeks of a new term that you won’t be the only one missing home. Talking to your flatmates or coursemates about home can help you to remember the good things about home, but also help you remember why you’ve moved away and all the good things that will bring.

2- Home comforts.

No matter how old you are, there is absolutely nothing wrong with bringing things that remind you of home, even if that is a cuddly toy! Other items that work include blankets, posters, and fairy lights. Anything that makes your room feel like your space, rather than just an empty room.

3- Photos

On the subject of home comforts, I advise you to buy yourself a photo album or two and print out some of your favourite photos and memories from home. Although now a days we mostly store our photos on our phones, there’s something a little bit more special about a physical copy, and looking through them can really help if you’re having a hard time.

4- Call home.

Don’t be ashamed to excuse yourself from social areas in your flat to make a phone call to the family. It helps you to stay in touch with news from home, and to connect with the people who up until now, you’ve most likely been living with all your life. Using apps such as FaceTime and Skype can enhance this as you get to see faces and places, rather than just voices.

5. Make new friends.

Although you may at times feel like you’re betraying life long friendships by making new friends while you’re away, you’re not. Your home friends would want you to be making new friends and having new experiences, and although at times this may be hard to see, it’s important to remember you can always stay in touch with them in different ways, even if you’re not physically present. 

Independence at Edge Hill University – Freedom is more than 4 AM Netflix

Independence At University

Independence At University


Independence at university is something that I know you will be looking forward to in the coming year. Doing what you want when you want is amazing. So being able to have a full tube of Pringles to yourself at five in the morning is well within your grasp but being independent is much further away. Growing up takes guts, and practice. Learning how to live and survive on your very own is a serious of falling flat on your face before you figure out how to ride the bike of life. I can’t help you with that, but I can give you a few tips to help you when you move to Edge Hill in September.


Start small. Lets take it from day 1 when you move in. Get settled and know your way around your room. Start mentally planning how you are going to take care of yourself. Is there anything you need to buy or bring with you? Make a list if it helps. Learn how to do laundry if you don’t already. Start cleaning your room every day. All of these are going to be essential when you live alone. Starting now, today, gives you a jump-start on everyone else around you. And don’t be afraid to mess up.


Your TimeMaking sure your time is managed well is essential to becoming independent. Remember all of those teachers who said “it’s your own time you’re wasting” ? Well they were kinda right. You need to make sure when you tell yourself you are doing something you do it. If your washing day is on Wednesday then do the washing on Wednesday. And again, if you want your Independence, then start today. Using your time well  means you get more done. Getting more done means you don’t rely on others. That makes you independent.


The Cash MoneyThe last piece of advice I can give you is budget. There are many ways you can go about this, and if you find one that works tell me about it please. Money is hard to come by and easier to lose so make sure you spend it well. You need to think about more than the usual costs. Set aside something for the unforeseen circumstance. Starting out this is hard, but getting a part-time job is a great way to help. Make sure you don’t abuse an overdraft. It is not free money no matter what your mate who is 600 pound deep tells you.


These are the three best tips I can give you. It is important that you give it your best every day when you come to university and understand that it gets easier. You might find yourself struggling with money one week and the washing machine the other but we’ve all been there and it gets easier. I can only wish you the best of luck. I’ve linked in a few more blogs below that you might find useful.

Edge Hill Laundrette – Doing your washing is loads of fun

Volunteering and Part-time Jobs


That’s all from me, but if you want to find out more about getting started at Edge Hill you can have a look at their website for information on any aspect of University life here.

And if you want more free and great information email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!