Budgeting as a Student

Before coming to University, there’s a good chance you’ve heard students talking about how little money they have. No matter how generous your student loan can be, it can be easy to spend too much and be left with pennies. However, there are plenty of small changes you can make to stop yourself going into your overdraft. In this blog, I’m going to talk about how I’ve managed my money.

Treating Yourself

It can be tempting to splurge – and you should! University is stressful, and you should spend money to enjoy yourself. Usually, people would treat themselves to a takeaway, and although they’re nice, they’re expensive. At ALDI, you can buy pizzas for as cheap as 65p, and as expensive as £3. You can also buy curry sauce, rice, and sides for less than £5. With takeaway pizzas usually costing as cheap as £6, by doing this you’re saving more than £5, which can make a huge difference while still getting the takeaway experience. Side note: A majority of ALDI’s items are the cheapest in Ormskirk, so it’s more economical to do most/all your shopping there!

Going Out

Liverpool is a train ride away and can make for a nice night out. However, a cinema trip can cost £12 (£5 for a train ticket with railcard and £7 for the cinema ticket). Instead of spending £12 to see a film, why not take a five-minute walk to see a free film every Friday in our Arts Centre? The £12 you’re saving can go towards clothes or a food shop.

Getting a Job

Shops in Ormskirk are always hiring, but there are opportunities to earn money on campus, such as being a student representative. This can be beneficial if your student loan is low, although a job would be another factor to accommodate for in your work-life balance. Thankfully, there is support at University to help you manage your time, as well as helping you manage money.

Closing Words

Saving money doesn’t mean you have to cut out all the things you enjoy in your life. You just may need to splash out less frequently, and look for alternative, cheaper ways. I’ve never had any issues with money, and I’ve been able to enjoy myself (as have many of my friends, so hopefully these ideas will be effective for you.

Ways to Save Money on Campus (Part 2)

Welcome back to part 2 of this mini-series! In part 1 I gave you some tips for getting filling, affordable lunches that also earn you freebies and also explained how to make your coffee addiction work for you. This time, we’ll look at how you can eat and drink on campus when your finances are looking seriously frightful…without any lukewarm sandwiches being carted around in your rucksack!

Staying Hydrated

It’s easy to quickly rack up unnecessary spending at university by grabbing drinks from shops and vending machines, not to mention the excess plastic you can get through by doing this. Get yourself a water bottle and enjoy crisp, cool water from the filtered fountains all over campus!

Staying Full

Studying hard is hungry work and there’s nothing like a study session to get you craving snacks! So, having plenty of hearty food is key for a long day on campus. One way to do this on a tight budget is to cook warm, filling meals at home in bulk then bring a portion (or two, we don’t judge) to university with you. In the SU building, you will find some microwaves where you can heat up your pre-prepped meals to enjoy in between classes. This can save you £2-£6 a day minimum on-campus spending and potentially hundreds of pounds each month in groceries if you plan ahead and buy simple ingredients in bulk!

Cutting Costs on Caffeine

In part 1 I explained how to get discounts on coffee and how you can make the most of loyalty schemes, but I know that sometimes buying coffee on the go is just not an option. However, it’s an absolute staple drink in the average student’s day!

My advice is to grab a travel mug and keep plenty of your favourite tea bags or coffee sachets in your bag. Simply ask for hot water at one of the cafes or coffee shops on campus.

So, there we have it! A handful of ways to scrimp, save and spend wisely on campus. What advice would you add?

Sam xo

Budget Tips

Freshers week has come and gone and you might be looking at your bank account and think ‘oh god’. I know the feeling and my friends do too. So here’s a few tips and tricks to try and keep you afloat, at least until the next semester 😉.

Keep track of your money

Try and figure out your weekly budget and then any money you spend during the week, make a note of it. By the end of the week you should be able to total it up and hopefully, you’ll find that you save a little bit of money every week from this.

Overdrafts will be a saviour

Although I don’t have an overdraft myself, i know from my friends at Uni that their overdraft has basically saved them until the next semester. This almost acts as a safety line that if you go into it, it won’t affect your social life. However, try not to go deep into your overdraft as you will have to pay the money back.

Use cash

This is something myself and one of my friends have discovered. Using cash instead of your card makes you know what money you have in your purse. Also, if you’re like me and like to save a little bit of money, get a money jar and any spare change at the end of the week, you can put it in there.

Communal Meals

When I was in halls of residence, my flatmates and I ate some communal meals. This not only helped us all out with a bit of money but, it gave us a chance to sit down together and enjoy each other’s company. I definitely recommend doing this, even if its with your friends that you’ve made.

These are only a few tips on how to budget, but if you have any questions, drop them down below in the comments.

Signature for my posts. I end every post with a love heart

Ellis x

Best Places for all of your uni essentials!

Hi everyone,

After three years of living at university I have found a few favourite places where I like to buy all my essentials from including bedroom accessories and stationary. As I am on a budget I am always looking for a bargain so I thought I would share my favourite shops for all of your university products!

  1. Wilko

Wilko is really amazing for lots of university pieces, I got all of my kitchen utensils including plates, bowls, pans and cutlery and they are all so well priced. I am pretty sure I paid less than £3 for two plates. They have lots to offer and it is also nice stuff that isn’t just boring.

2. Primark

This one is probably my favourite out of all the shops because you can add to your wardrobe without breaking the bank as well as an amazing and ever growing home section. I got so many things throughout my time at uni from primary that are all really worthwhile such as candles, fairy lights, duvets and bedding that are all really good quality especially when on a budget and little things like fairy lights can make your uni room feel so homely and cosy. The home section in the Liverpool store is the best one!

Kitchen

3. Supermarkets

Even though Aldi is a supermarket, the special buys they have in there can be really good, especially for cleaning products and things like magazine racks and pencil cases. They always have different things in store so I think it just depends on what week you go! Supermarket home sections are also great for buying your kitchen essentials and they also always have really pretty mugs and tea towels!

4. The Works

Whilst The Works is predominately a book shop, they have an amazing selection of stationary from notebooks to diaries and amazing pens. I think every notebook I used throughout uni was from here and they are all amazingly priced and I love going in there!

I hope this was helpful!

Ellie xx

Budgeting Your Food Shop

Hi guys in one of my blogs from a few weeks back I talked about the different  food shops available to you around Ormskirk and what I think each one offers. Moving on from this I thought I would do one on the actual buying of food and how much you may be spending.


So for this i’m going to go by my own general shopping routine for accuracy so this will be catered mostly to shopping in Aldi since that is where I do most of mine. Any weekly shop in Aldi for me can vary depending on what I buy and how much of it I buy but on average I would say a weekly shop costs me around £30 including everything I need, which I think is really good for all I get bearing in mind I’m someone who eats quite a lot. Other people’s shops could vary a fair bit based on what they eat they may be closer to £20 or £40.


There are some good things to bear in mind when you are shopping such as looking out for reduced items or being careful to not buy quickly perishable foods unless you are sure you will eat them, frozen food is the food of students and you can find plenty of good frozen stuff from fruit and veg to burgers and chicken. Compare the weights of products to the price,  some things may look like a better deal but you might get more for your money getting a different bigger/smaller pack even if it’s more/less up front etc. Convenience costs more this one is pretty simple, the more handy stuff that’s maybe already seasoned or fridge ready is probably going to cost you more than it’s base counterpart, for example I used to buy seasoned pork chops but now I buy the pork chops and a marinade packet separate and it saves you around 50p. Obviously it’s fine to not have the time to bother always but it’s worth keeping in your head anyway. Own brand vs branded, Aldi is a mostly own brand shop hence why food is cheaper but most of their stuff is just as good as quality as branded so I have no problem buying it, although I still like some branded stuff on the side. No matter where you shop you will have the same choice to make but if your on a budget then own brand is most likely going to save you more money, but It’s also true that not every cheaper product will be worth buying so I like to try different things and then decide next time what i’m happy with.


So there’s a few things I’m thinking about when shopping which is crazy because before I started uni I just bought whatever I wanted without thinking about it which now just seems mental!

Till next time.

Jordan

Where to Do Your Food Shop

Hi guys, one of the main things people say about university is that you will never have any money which can be true. Obviously there are a lot of factors which will affect how much money you have to get by on, such as if your working or how much financial support you get, either way it will be a given for most of you that you will have to budget your money while away so I thought I would talk about the thing that will probably take up the most of your budget, the food shop and how best to tackle it.

Where to shop: Choosing where to shop is probably the most important choice you will make each week. Ormskirk has a variety of supermarkets including Morrison’s, Aldi, Iceland and Marks and Spencer’s, here’s a brief rundown.

M&S: This is the most expensive and probably won’t be your frequent if on a tight budget, but you may go there occasionally because some of the stuff is pretty good.

Morrison’s: This is your bog standard big supermarket that stocks everything, price wise it is probably a bit pricier than Tesco and Asda, more like Sainsbury’s but if you are just looking for the standard weekly shop, this is for you.

Iceland: Another choice, obviously specializing in frozen food that is especially handy for students as well as stocking a range of cupboard and fridge fillers, it’s great value and they sometimes offer student discount but you may not find everything you would need here.

Aldi: is the most budget friendly option, and where I do near all of my shopping, I love the place. Now obviously with Aldi most of what’s on offer is own brand  but most of the own brand food is just as good as branded and yes you do have less choice but they usually have everything you need and the lesser choice means that you pay a good bit less. Compared to say Morrison’s you could save £10 maybe £15 a week.

If you are someone who likes saving money, then shopping in multiple places will net you all the best bargains. When you first venture out to do your shopping your best bet will be to check out what’s around town and make the best choice for yourself since only you will know what you want.

Hope this helps and thanks for reading!

Jordan

Preparing to Leave Home

Hi everyone, for my second blog I’m just going to talk a little about moving out of home for the first time and going to University, and what you can do to prepare to make the transition more manageable, enjoyable and hopefully A lot less stressful!

1. Pack early: I know this might seem obvious but starting your packing even a week before leaving home is a really good idea, trust me. You don’t realise until it comes to packing how much stuff you need to bring with you, clothes, gadgets, trinkets and whatever else begin to pile up really quickly. In my personal experience even though I had done most of my packing by the time I was ready to leave, I still found myself running around like a headless chicken looking for my headphones and whatever else I realised I would definitely need.

Bag

2. Book travel well in advance: Doing this not only saves a lot of stress but also a lot of money. Obviously depending on where you live or your travel situation circumstances will be different but if you know you will be travelling by train or boat or plane, booking earlier can save you a lot of hassle that can be caused by booked up journeys or lack of luggage, space say if you were going on a busy flight and needed cabin baggage. In my experience if you book for example, A flight a month beforehand which in my case was coming over from Northern Ireland, an early booked flight would only usually cost £10/20 but leave it too close to the date and you could end up paying more like £50/60 which is a LOT more if you’re a budgeting student.

Plane

3. Don’t worry if your late: I know you definitely want to arrive on time for your moving in day and you most likely will, but on the off-chance you don’t (like me) don’t stress, Edge Hill is very accommodating and even though I was one of the last people to pick up my keys, someone still took the time to show me to my accommodation where I finally arrived to meet my flatmates for the first time, which didn’t make any difference that I was late as everyone was also still pretty nervous! Moral of the story, chill out it will be fine :).

Money Tips

Hey all, I hope you’re doing well!

One of the things that can be difficult to manage as a student is money. For many students, it’s the first time they’ve had a lot of money responsibility, especially if you decide to live in Halls away from your family and haven’t gotten as much money to budget as Student Finance can give you. So, I thought I’d give you some tips from my own personal experience, so that it’s a little easier for you:

  • 1- If you’re going to spend money, take money out rather than using your card: It sounds like a simple tip and sometimes it can be unavoidable, but budgeting is a lot easier if you know exactly what money you’re spending, as some banks sometimes take a while to show transactions, so it can slip you up quite easily.
  • 2- Do regular budget checks: Sometimes things will come up and you might buy something or go on a night out and spend some money you hadn’t originally budgeted for, so it’s always good to go back over your budget at least monthly to make sure things are in check.
  • 3- Always leave some money to the side: It’s easy to budget and think that it’s a rock solid budget that you don’t need a fall back for, but it’s always good to have a bit of extra money, even if it just ends up being put towards going to see a film or going to a theme park later on.
  • 4- Jobs are scary but good: Dependent on your life experiences so far, you may or may not have had a professional job before. It’s ok if you hadn’t, I hadn’t, but it can be worrying when you’re looking for one. It’s good to get one to help out with your money though, it’s always nice to have something as well as Student Finance.
  • 5- Make sure you have your rent: Your rent is something that you need to make sure you prioritise. It’s easy to just think ‘oh my student finance will cover it when it comes through’ but you need to make sure you’ll have the money there when you need it without stress.

So, there’s a few things I’ve learnt to bare in mind when it comes to money. I hope some of these tips help you out.

Budgeting as a student

Being able to budget and plan your money is incredibly important as a student. It may be your first time receiving money where you have specific things you’ve got to pay for such as rent, food, sports memberships as well as the extras such as going out with friends wherever that may be to.

You should start by working out how much money you have coming in. This could be through Student Finance or from a part-time job that you are currently working. You should then make a list of all essential outgoings such as rent, bills, travel costs, course materials, food, toiletries, clothes and insurance as well as any extra study expenses which are expected for your course.

The next step is to work out how much you can afford to spend on each of these areas. Remember to save some money for optional extras such as entertainment as well as unexpected expenses and future savings. There are also often bigger occasions to save for such as holidays, Christmas and birthdays.

You should then look for ways to make savings. This could include buying your food from a cheaper supermarket or bulk buying certain items with the other people you are living with. You could also try having no spend days which can help keep your costs down considerably. If you are paying bills, take a look to see if there is a cheaper provider for the services you are receiving. Student discounts such as student rail cards, bus passes and the NUS card can also help you to save a little extra.

Finally, you should always keep track of what you are spending and review this regularly. This will help you to know whether you can afford to make certain luxury purchases or whether you should wait. You could keep a list or use an app or programme such as Blackbullion.

If you aren’t currently working but need a little extra money, you should consider a part-time job. The careers centre at Edge Hill are incredibly friendly and helpful and can check over your application or CV to help you get a job which is suited to the skills and experience you already have. Working whilst at university helps to improve your skills such as time management and communication and can also be a great way to network with other professionals in the area you hope to study in after you graduate. The money advice team at Edge Hill are always happy to help with any questions you may have about budgeting or funding.

Food Shop – Budgeting Your Money

For a lot of people, one of the biggest worries about coming to uni is money. Will I have enough of it? What happens if I spend too much in freshers week? How does paying for my accommodation work? All of these are things I worried about before arriving at Edge Hill, so I’m here to pass on some knowledge I’ve learnt in my time here.

Firstly, if you’re worried about spending too much of your loan before your accommodation payment comes out, you can arrange with the accommodation team to take the payment out as soon as it comes in, so you can’t be tempted to spend too much too soon!

Another way I learnt to keep track of my spending was to budget my weekly food shop. I was lucky enough to have parents that sent me £30 a week for this purpose, as my maintenance loan minus my accommodation fee wouldn’t allow for this.

£30 may not sound like a lot, but with some careful planning and shopping around, (as we’re lucky enough to have multiple supermarkets in Ormskirk)  I found out that it was plenty to keep me fed for a week, and I often even had a little left over for a treat or two.

Here is a basic break down of a generic weekly shop for me:

Aldi: I would usually use Aldi as a starting point, as it has lots of different food bits that I could pick up, such as sauces and salad kits, which I could then add to from Morrison’s.

Potatoes: £1. Sweet Potatoes: £1. Stir Fry Kit: £2.50. Instant Noodles (x3): £1.20. Cheese: £1.90. Apples: £1.30 Pasta Bake Sauce: 65p. Crisps: £1. Sweet and Sour Sauce: 85p. Spread: £1.90. Ham: £1.45.

Added together this cost me £14.75, about half of my weekly budget, and I now have the main elements of evening meals and lunch.

Morrison’s: I know would use Morrison’s to add to the dishes, and pick up any extra bargains I could see, as Morrison’s often have clearance areas, and these are great for finding meat, cheese and other treats.

Steak: £2.50. Chicken and Pork: 2 for £5 offer. Part baked baguettes (x2 packs): 90p. Pasta: £1. Pineapple: £1. Ice Cream: £1.50. Squash: £1. Milk: £1. Cereal Bars: £1.

Added together this comes to £14.90, giving an overall total of £29.65, keeping just under budget. Some weeks, this would be considerably less, as I wouldn’t need some items every week, such as the packs of meat, squash, and spread, leaving me some money left over for the occasional takeaway of fast food trip.

Hopefully this has helped some people, or at least given you an idea of what to expect when you come to do your very first food shop for yourself!