Edge Hill University Exams – Checking 6+5 on a calculator just to be sure

Edge Hill Exams and Thoughts

Edge Hill Exams and Thoughts


Last Friday (12th of May 2018) I had the first and last of my exams for my year at University. I thought, even though its going to be far off for all you first years starting in September, it would be a good idea to share some facts and thoughts of mine regarding the exams.

The exam I undertook was for Computing and the 40 question multiple choice exam was underwhelming for me coming straight out of the Irish Education system where my entire grade was based on a set of written exams over one week, but the examination conditions themselves were still very daunting. So without rambling on here are they things that I.


The exam setup was straight forward. We were given a time and a place. Wilson Gym at 14:30. Turning up 10 minutes before was a good idea, and most of the other students had the same idea. We were given our seat numbers by means of a list suck to the wall outside the gym hall itself. Everybody was a bit nervous. It was our first exam of the year and for most the first exam we have ever taken at university.

 


The RulesFinally settled in and in our seats it was time to hear from our exam invigilators the rules of the exam. This helped, again many of us sitting our first university exam had us stressed. The rules were basic.

  • No phones or electronics
  • No talking or discussion
  • Stay for the first 30 mins
  • Stay for the last 30 mins
  • Jackets and bags at the back
  • Uni card on the desk

Simple as that really.


The examAnd finally the exam itself came around. We started slightly late but we were given access to a clock clearly displayed in the hall so keep track of our own time and ensure we managed it correctly.

My exam consisted of 40 multiple choice questions. We were given the exam sheet and a separate answer booklet to mark our answers into. The university also uses an anonymous marking system so our names were covered up when we finished.


All and all the exam went well. It was slightly stressful trying to study the material we were given for it and I recommend reading these blogs if you are worried about stress at University:

Dealing with Stress at University – Stress is like the flu, everyone usually gets it

Exam time- how to have a stress free exam period

But we all made it through and finished our exams in good time but here are a few tips I can give you to make you look like an exam pro:

  • Read the booklet and exam carefully. Fill out everything
  • Don’t be afraid to ask if there is a problem
  • Get more paper if you need it. It’s free!
  • Bring your Uni card! Otherwise you will have to wait for the exam to be completely finished to be identified by someone from the academic registry.
  • Breath and chill out. The real exam is life.


That’s all from me, but if you want to find out more about EHU exams, how they are run and even corrected you can check out this link for more info!

And if you want more free and great information email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Edge Hill Life Hacks – Everyone’s free (to wear sunscreen)

Everybody's free to wear sunscreen

Everybody's free to wear sunscreen


Coming to the end of my first year at Edge Hill University I thought it would be worth while writing a blog as a homage to one of my all time favourite songs and essays. The title of this blog might seem odd if you haven’t heard Baz Luhrmanns “Everybody’s Free (To Wear Sunscreen)”, adapted from Mary Schmich’s column “Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young” – (You can listen here and read here) but here goes anyway.


If I could offer you only one tip for the future, studying would be it would be it. The long-term benefits of studying have been proved by professors, whereas the rest of my advice has no basis more reliable than my own first year experience. I will dispense this advice now.

Enjoy the experience and ease of first year. Oh, never mind. You will not understand the experience of first year until you graduate. But trust me, in 20 years, you’ll look back at photos of yourself and recall in a way you can’t grasp now how much possibility lay before you and how fabulous you really looked. You are not as far behind as you imagine.

Don’t worry about exams. Or worry, but know that worrying is as effective as trying to write a dissertation by chewing bubble gum. The real exams in your life are apt to be things that never crossed your worried mind, the kind that blindside you at 8 p.m. before social on Wednesday.

Give something a go every day that scares you.

Karaoke.

Don’t be reckless with other people’s hearts. Don’t put up with people who are reckless with yours. Invest in relationships.

Relax.

Don’t waste your time on social media. Sometimes you’re ahead, sometimes you’re behind. The race is long and, in the end, it’s not on a mobile phone.

Remember firsts you receive. Forget the fails. If you succeed in doing this, tell me how.

Keep your old essays. Throw away your old timetables.

Don’t feel guilty if you don’t know what job you want from your course. The most interesting people I know didn’t know at 22 what they were even studying. Some of the most interesting 40-year-olds are still in classes.

Get plenty of sleep. Be kind to your ears. You’ll miss them when they’re gone.

Don’t expect anyone else to write your reports. Maybe you have a best friend. Maybe you’ll have a smart partner. But you never know when either one might not want to help.

Don’t mess too much with your looks or by the time you’re 40 your dyed blue hair will have fallen out.

Be careful whose classes you take, but be patient with those who teach them. Teaching is a form of nostalgia. Dispensing it is a way of fishing the past from the bin, wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts and recycling it for more than it’s worth.

But trust me on the studying.


 

Life as a Mature Student

Are you currently considering studying at Edge Hill University as a mature student? Deciding to go to university as a mature student was a decision willed with excitement and nerves for me. Part of me was worried what it would be like studying after years of being out of formal education, but I was also incredibly excited to start a new chapter of my life. I firmly believe that studying as a mature student is different than studying straight out of school/sixth form/college but it is possible and such an amazing experience!

Juggling your time:

As a mature student it is likely that you will have many responsibilities outside of university. From caring from a family, running your home, taking part in clubs or activities that you currently enjoy to having to work. Your time will inevitably be filled to the max! But this doesn’t have to mean it isn’t possible. I have fund using a diary, both on my phone and a paper version, as well as creating lists of what needs doing and when to be very helpful. It enables you to fit more into your days than you ever thought possible.

You will make new friends:

People of all ages study a multitude of courses at Edge Hill. You will make friends of all ages and find people who share your interests as well as others who will inspire you to try something new. There is so much to do and so many places to go both around campus and in Ormskirk too.

The environment is inspiring:

Edge Hill campus is a wonderful place. From my very first visit during an Open Day it felt welcoming, inviting and safe. There are many places to study around campus from the library to the Hub as well as specialist rooms such as those in Creative Edge. Then when it is time to relax there are loads of places to eat and spend time with friends, including a Subway! Being in an environment which is supportive and encouranging can be incredibly motivating too.

You’ll have a different perspective in lectures:

Having real life, often hands on, experience will mean you will be able to apply what you have learnt in the lectures to your real life experiences. This can give you a different perspective especially when completing assignments. As an Early Childhood Studies student, one of my first year module assignments was a reflective booklet. I found it very interesting being able to reflect on what I had learnt in my workplace and relate this to the skills I would need for future practice.

Great Places to Study on Campus

Hey all, I hope you are well!

At University, sometimes studying in your room can be a little bit distracting. Netflix is only a click away, your bed becomes a burrito cave of comfort… it can be really hard to study in your room. Occasionally, I can get some work done at my house, however, I often find it a lot easier to focus at Uni. There are a few reasons for this, the main one being that as well as there being less distractions, the resources I need to study are all there right next to me!

There are many different places on campus that are great to study, so I thought I’d give you some info on just where you can do this!

The Edge Hill Library

The Edge Hill Library is my all time favourite and most productive place in which I can study! The library has all the books you could possibly need for research and essays, computers for if you don’t have a laptop with you, tables to work at and also study rooms in which you can book. Not only can you book independent study rooms, but also you can book group rooms for if you are doing a group project and need a more isolated environment!

The Edge Hill library also has a help desk, so if you ever need help finding resources, or need help due to learning disabilities such as Dyslexia, that’s the best place to go. They even do screenings for Dyslexia if you’re unsure whether or not you have it.

They are currently in the process of building a brand new library for the students, which is going to be even bigger and better! So you’ve got this to look forward to if you apply to come to Edge Hill University!

Hale Hall

Hale Hall is situated within the Hub in the centre of campus. It is open for anyone to come and enjoy some time and sit and relax, but is also an amazing place to study! It’s not that often that it gets noisy, and the environment is generally nice and relaxed, so if you wanted to study it’s not a very distracting place to do so, making it perfect. Plus, it gets you out of your room and also the sofas are actually really comfy (if I do say so myself!).

The LINC Building

The LINC building has 90 open access PCs for use of students, and also printing facilities in case you need to print anything out such as coursework. If you’re writing an essay, or want to write up some research you’ve done, it’s always great to use the LINC building’s facilities!

At times, it can be busy, especially around deadline/exam time, however, it always has a good environment and the students are always respectful of each others’ study time, so there are very little distractions here!

So those are just a few of the places in which you can study without the distractions that come with studying in your room! I find that when I’m in the mind frame in which I’m easy to distract, or if I am a little lost in where to go with my studying, I like to use these places to get back on track with certain assignments and I find it really helps to get out of my room.

Staying Motivated!

Hi everyone,

Now that it is not long until our easter break, assignment and exam season is looming upon us once again. For some of you, including me, you may have a number of essays all due within days of each other which can be quite overwhelming meaning that many of us enter panic mode and become quite stressed. This can often lead to feeling unmotivated as you feel like everything is piling up all at once, so here is some advice I hope is helpful for you!

1. Plan ahead

Planning your assignments in advance will help ease some stress as by doing this you will already know how to tackle your essays. You can do this through many ways such as, one to one meetings with your tutors so you can discuss the details of your assessments more extensively. You could also plan your essay so that you have something to guide you when it actually comes to writing your essay. Another useful tip is to make a note of when all your deadlines are, I did this by making a poster and sticking it up in my room to keep me reminded.

2. Talk to your tutors

If you feel overwhelmed by your assessments and it all starts to get a bit too much, it might be a good idea to arrange a meeting with your module leader or even your personal tutor. These meetings can be really helpful at easing your mind. Additionally, by discussing your essay with a tutor they can help you with any queries you may have as well as making sure you are on the right track!

3. Use the library

If like me you struggle to concentrate when your friends are surrounding you, going to the library can make a huge difference. At our library there are three floors which are a key to three modes of studying. The first floor is for group study, the second floor is for quiet study and the third floor is strictly for silent study. Also, you can book an individual study room in the library if you feel like you need it, they all have a computer and you won’t be disturbed this way.

4. Don’t doubt yourself

It is so easy to doubt yourself when there is a lot of pressure on you so always try to stay positive and do everything you can to help yourself out so that you can be as stress free as possible!

Your Big Step to University

Hello everyone! I hope you’ve had a lovely weekend. I have just had reading week so have been back in Manchester visiting my family. Now that I’m back at uni, it’s back to work!

When we grow up we are always told how important the next step is – primary school, high school, GCSE’s, A-levels…and now University. So I hope I can take the pressure off a bit and help you with any worries you may have!

How will your university course be different to college/sixth form?

For most courses, your lecture and seminar hours will be a lot less than you had at A-level. Some course have as little as 4 hours a week, whilst other courses like mine (Primary Education) can have up to 18 hours a week. No matter the amount of time you have timetabled, it is about what you personally get out of it. Unlike A-level when you depend on your teachers a lot, university allows you to have more freedom and initiated learning during your own time.

How formal is university?

Personally, I found my sixth form to be a lot more formal than university life. At Edge Hill, I feel I can talk to the tutors on a more personal level, rather than referring to teachers’ second names like I have done throughout school!

How many exams will you have?

The number of exams you will have depends on your course, but I suggest finding this information out as it will help you feel prepared. The university decides what is included in your modules which makes all lesson content useful. I found that A-levels were mostly centred around remembering the specific mark schemes for your exams. However, at university I believe you are taught real-life skills and necessary information that will provide you with a foundation for your next step (which may be your chosen career).

If you have any more questions like these, feel free to comment below! Thank you for reading, looking forward to speaking soon!

Anna 🙂

 

 

 

Preparing for continuous assessment at Edge Hill – You won’t have to cram the night before!


If you are a student of an education system that relies on exams for assessment you may have never even come across the term ‘Continuous Assessment’. This method of assessment is commonly used in courses throughout Edge Hill University so it is a good idea to get to know what it is and practice before you start under this type of education.


Continuous Assessment is the practice of giving you a grade based on your coursework that is submitted over the length of your course. For example you may be given an assignment every week for two months, each representing a certain percentage of your final grade. This means that you are already stacking up points towards your grade as soon as you submit work. Meaning you don’t have to worry about remembering everything at once on one particular day. If you are already prepared for this type of assessment you will slip right into the swing of things. However if you, like me, are from an education background where everything is based on exams it might take some time to adjust.


Clock with time on notepadTime management is a very important aspect of this method of study. If you don’t manage your time correctly you will miss deadlines. Unlike missing your homework, missing your deadline for coursework results in your grade being affected. You have to manage your time well in order to maximize your grade.


Notes on a4 paperKeeping notes simple and brief is also important. Unlike taking notes for something that you will not review for weeks, months or even years, continuous assessment is set on a much shorter time range. Your notes should be short but clear so that you get everything down and quickly refer to them later. Your brain will do most of the work remembering.


Concept lifestyle image of balance.Balance is possibly the most important. You need to make time and put the same amount of effort into all your coursework. You will like some more than others, and as such its easy to dismiss pieces you don’t want to complete. Work hard at it and keep your head down. Remember, it is your grade at stake.

 


Follow these steps and try to practice these skills in your every day life. A good example is taking homework as serious as your exams for a week or two to get used to putting your best into something on a weekly basis.

While not all courses at Edge Hill are fully coursework based most have elements of continuous assessment. Remember to prepare for any exams you might have also.

If you want more free and great advice email think@edgehill.ac.uk or leave a comment below and I will get back to you. If you want to suggest something to write about or want to be interviewed leave a comment below also and I will get back to you personally!

Assignment Writing Tips!

Happy new year!

Now I am back at university, I have a lot of coursework ahead of me…yey! Writing assignments can be a difficult task for everyone and it is often hard to know where to start. Here are a few handy tips I wish I knew as a fresher…

  1. Visit the library 
Edge Hill Library

After reading all of the notes provided by your tutors, you should have a clear picture of what the assignment question wants from you. Edge Hill’s library is stocked with thousands of books and journals for every course. By accessing the online library system, you can search for any specific books appropriate for your assignment question. The library codes provided will then allow you to easily find your book. They are automatically renewed every 2 weeks, unless it is reserved by other students. However, if you know a lot of students are also searching for similar topics, I advise you reserve them in advance! I really recommend referring to books or journals when writing assignments because websites are often unreliable. Although, Google Scholar is a useful tool to use.

2. Plan, plan, plan!

An obvious aspect which is important for writing assignments is the planning involved. I find it difficult to start writing without an initial outline. Even if it is a small or messy plan, it is necessary to have something to guide you and jot down your ideas. I usually take the time to gather any queries I may have to ask the appropriate tutor. However, there is usually all the information you need available on Black Board.

  1. Take breaks

Often, the most difficut part of writing an essay is thinking about how to start it. I find that once you get started, you begin to feel more confident. BUT, remember to have breaks. It depends on the person, but I personally cannot work hours straight without procrastinating! Grab a coffee, phone a friend or get some fresh air.

  1. Proof-read

I cannot stress enough how important it is to proof-read. A simple spelling mistake can affect your mark based on the grading criteria. It took me a long time after submission to realise I wrote ‘practioners’ instead of ‘practitioners’ 10 times in one essay. Try to proof-read when you’re not too tired because that is when mistakes can be easily looked over!

  1. Take advantage of Edge Hill’s resources

Edge Hill offer a wide range of student support including help with academia. Uni Skills hold regular workshops to advise on academic writing, as well as organising one-to-one support. These learning services are always there, so don’t panic and don’t be afraid to ask for help!

I hope these few tips will be useful to you and I wish you the best of luck for your coursework and exams! Feel free to ask any questions, until next time! 🙂

It’s Christmas! 6 Winter ways to relax

Merry Christmas to you all- and to those who don’t celebrate- I hope you’re having a wondeful winter break!

Following on from last weeks blog on wellbeing (linked here), this week is all about ways to take a step back and chill out over the break – wether you’re on or off campus.

1. Layer up and go for a walk- you’ll see some pretty sights, and it counts as exercise for the day! (If on campus, I recommend taking a stroll around the lakes and saying hello to the ducks!)

2. Read a book- and not a text book! Take some time out to cozy up and immerse yourself in a good story. Libraries on and off campus are a great place to discover something new.

Christmas tree in the SU shop

3. Meet up with friends old and new. Share stories of the first few months of the academic year- show off your Edge Hill merch and exchange gifts.

Flat mates that buy you Edge Hill Christmas jumpers are keepers

4. Have a bath! If you’ve come home from shower-only halls, coming home to a house with a bath feels like the biggest luxury. Grab yourself a bath bomb and soak away!

5. Food! Christmas time means there will be all sorts of food to go around- and it certainly makes a change from a student diet of instant noodles, pasta and toast!

6. Get any course work done early. There’s nothing worse than trying to relax with the weight of unfinished assignments hanging over your head. Knuckle down and get them done so you can have a guilt-free rest of the break! For those of you with exams coming up in January- make yourself a time table of what you’re doing over Christmas- and slot in time to revise and stick to it, so you can feel prepared and not be worrying when you should be enjoying time with family and friends. 

For other tips and takes on the Christmas period at Edge Hill, see Anna and Ellie’s blogs about celebrating Hanukkah at uni and tips for studying over the break.

That’s all from me for now, I hope you all have a wonderful day and rest of the break!

Edge Hill’s Learning Services!

So here we are. Last week I blogged about all the different support and services Edge Hill has to offer except one: Learning services. So that is what we will be talking about today, hope you enjoy!


The learning service team is located in the library. The team can help with an array of issues. An example of help they can offer is helping you work the wifi on campus!


An important team within learning services is the disability support team!  The disability support teams provide a range of specialist study skills support, to help you develop strategies that you can use in your studies and other areas of your life.

Some areas of help they offer include planning essays, time management, organisational skills, note-taking techniques, reading strategies, referencing,  proofreading strategies, and more! The disability team can help you apply for DSA, which as someone who went through this process, I can say for certain that the team are wonderful when it comes to giving help and advice!


Learning service can also teach you how to use the library catalogue. The online library catalogue works similarly to google scholar, as you can type in keywords to find your subject, however, with this resource you have full access to the books and readings.

The catalogue has both online and physical readings, which is great in case you can’t make it down to campus as you can narrow your search to online texts and look through those.
Additionally, you can look and see if the book you want is currently available at the library and reserve books to collect later at the library! There are also computers stationed around the library dedicated solely to the catalogue.  


Learning services can also help with printing. There are printing and photocopying machines dotted around the entire library. They are all connected to one network so as soon as you click print you can log into any printer and print from there, minimising the queues of students waiting to use one printer. You can top up your printing credit at the learning services desk!


Thanks for reading this short but sweet blog post, if you have any topics you want to hear more about then make sure to comment!
Until next time!

Film /Show of the day: Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010)