The Path Less Travelled

In one of my first blog posts for Inside Edge, ‘Am I too old to go to uni?’, I wrote a little about my decision to come to uni at the age of 23 in an attempt to reassure everyone that it is never too late (and you are never too old) to pursue your dreams. Today, I want to really drive that point home and shed some light on the rather twisty, hilly path I took from sixth form to university. I guess, compared to the majority, it’s the path less traveled.

For most of my time in sixth form, I was preparing to go to university. I didn’t particularly want to and I didn’t feel remotely excited like my peers did, but it seemed like the right and most obvious thing to do. I didn’t even question it. As the application process came to an end and I stared at a UCAS Track inbox full of offers from brilliant universities…I realised that I didn’t want to accept a single one of them. I yearned to be out in the world working and I was desperate to start a creative career. I knew from the research I had done for my personal statement that I didn’t actually need a degree for my chosen career if I could get a solid portfolio so I had a blog throughout college and eventually secured an incredibly prestigious and competitive apprenticeship in social media and digital marketing for businesses. I worked for a fabulous agency in Manchester and was kept on to look after some big household brands after qualifying, living the good life, and drinking free cocktails in fancy bars after work!

Fast forward slightly and my Dad passed away suddenly, leaving me feeling lost and desperate to be with my family more to support them. I gave up my role in digital marketing and spent nearly two years working in foreign currency retail so that I had flexible shifts and never had to take work home with me so that my time with my Mum was undistracted. After 18 months of this, I felt more like ‘me’, and that yearn to be creative was biting at my heels once more. I returned to digital marketing and was delighted to be creating once more, but something was missing.

I had been struggling with my own mental health for years and struggled to find any support in my local area due to huge waiting lists and funding issues. One day, after a truly life-changing phone call with an NHS Psychological Wellbeing Practitioner, I Googled his job title and added ‘how to qualify’. Straight away I came across my degree, Counselling and Psychotherapy, and fell in love with how Edge Hill in particular cover the subject in a person-centred way with a huge focus on professional practice and work experience. Throughout my first year and half of my second year, I continued working in my digital marketing role part-time to support myself before deciding to work as a support worker for adults with learning disabilities early in 2020.

As you can see, I’ve moved backwards and forwards through my digital marketing career with breaks to work in retail/foreign exchange in between before deciding to retrain as a psychotherapist by returning to full-time education as an adult. Even whilst studying I have moved jobs in order to better align with my long term goals and feel more fulfilled in my work. I came to Edge Hill aged 23 and will leave next summer at the age of 26 with a CV that would be about 5 pages long if I included everything! The message? Once again…it is NEVER too late and you are NEVER too old.

Sam xo

Sorting out the future

Over the past few weeks, since finishing my course I have been spending my time wisely in that I have been looking for and applying for jobs within the health care sector and likewise with apprenticeships, as I feel an apprenticeship maybe easier to get for the short-to medium term than a job. Whilst I have had a rejection, not heard back from another and am still waiting to hear about a position I have applied for within the NHS I am pleased to say I have got two interviews! The first is next Wednesday and this is for a job that involves helping to improve the quality of life for people in Blackburn (a town in east Lancashire that I can get to on the bus back home) with learning disabilities. The other is for an apprenticeship in a care assistant role which involves caring for the elderly. Whilst I may not get either position, there are other ones in the pipeline (that I have applied for) and it’s just a case of persevering. This kind of thing is definitely a “Some you win, some you lose” type situation. Some I might not hear back from, some I might get a rejection for, some I might get an interview for but not get called back but one job or apprenticeship out there will be the one I end up doing.

One thing that has really been helping me in all this though (besides the support of my family back home) is Edge Hill Career’s Service. I have been to see them more times since finishing my degree than I ever did during my studies. I have mentioned them a few times before in previous posts but they really are helpful for things like checking your CV, applying for jobs, giving interview tips and advice and other career related matters.If you want to check them out, then the links to their Facebook page and Edge Hill page are below 🙂

Edge Hill Careers Center

Edge Hill Careers