I’m Making a TV Show! | Film and Television Production

As you can tell by the title this post will be all about the TV show I am currently creating, what I have been up to in regards to the show and some advice sprinkled throughout. The TV program is part of my course, as I am a film and television production student. The brief for the production is that it has to be a ‘magazine show’, e.g this morning, the one show, blue peter, etc. However, your show can be about anything you want it to be! As long as it’s in a magazine show format and is 28 minutes and 40 seconds long.


The TV show is all about animals and is called Animal Earth. The reason I decided to do an animal show is that I just really love animals, so I thought it was a win-win situation as I can make a show while being surrounded by animals. The episode that is being filmed is all about dogs, which includes having dogs in the studio!


I’m the Director of the show, which I am loving so far! I love directing as you can be creative while coming up with the idea of the show, planning the segments in the show, and writing the autocue script. As well as directing, I have been doing other fun things such as creating a website to promote the show.


If you’re interested in the production and want to see what we’re up to as a production, feel free to check out our social media, we are on; FaceBook, Instagram, Twitter, and we have a website. So, now you’re probably wondering what I have been up to in regards to the TV production over the last week, well…


Over the last couple of weeks, my group have had studio training incorporated into our lessons. The studio sessions are always really fun, as everyone gets to work on their area of interest while working together as a team to make the show the best it can possibly be!  
The studio itself is split into two parts: the gallery (including the sound booth), and the floor (the room in which the show is shot). My group of fifteen is spread between the two parts. In the gallery, there is a vision mixer, director, autocue, script supervisor, vt operator, producer, and sound technicians.  And in the studio, there are camera operators, floor manager, runners, and of course the presenters of the show.
As director I sit in the gallery overseeing the project and telling vision mixer and vt operator what I want on the screen while communicating to my floor manager and camera people want I need them to do in the studio to make my vision happen.


Planning Segments which means calling up different companies and organisations. I’d always recommend calling the company by emailing if possible as you’re more likely to get a response there and then if they can partake in your show.   

 


This last couple of weeks has consisted of many group meetings. These group meetings are vital, as every meeting strengthens the project and brings the group closer together. As a group we have also been dabbling with branding, experimenting with different logos and styles!   


Casting has played an important role in the production this week as the project needed a field presenter. If you ever find yourself needing a cast for a project, I’d highly recommend the website ‘Starnow’ as it has a vast amount of actors, who don’t mind doing unpaid work. I have used this website for the last three years for all my projects.


This week I have been writing the vt scripts for our segments. Having a script for whatever you’re filming, even if you can’t plan everything that will happen on the day is vital. For example, if you’re filming in a documentary style, it is still incredibly useful to have a script, to keep a certain structure to your production.


Thanks for reading this post, I hope you found it interesting or informative. Feel free to comment if you want more posts like this or want me to blog about anything in particular. If you want to continue following this TV production, make sure to follow the Animal Earth social media, which is on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and we have a website.  
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2018)

Global Game Jam 2018 – 48 Hours of Madness!

So, I (along with the rest of my team) have finally recovered from the Global Game Jam this last weekend.

“But, Caleb!” I hear you say at your screen, “This is a blog about University stuff!”

Well, the Global Game Jam is officially supported by the University, and is open to any Computer Science and Creative Writing students.

It’s a 48-hour event where teams of students have to make a game, where digital or tabletop, based on a specific theme each year. This year, the theme was Transmission. Previous years have had themes like Waves, Extinction, an Ouroboros or a heartbeat. You literally don’t know the theme until it’s announced in your area.

With such a wide theme as Transmission, of course most of the games involved some form of virus or zombies. The group I was in went on a slightly different path. Our game (called Hero Chronicle) involves a group of heroes fighting against an evil god and his Plague. The theme of “Transmission” revolved around the heroes’ powers rather than the Plague seen in the game. As the theme was left so open, teams were able to come up with any ideas.

The Game Jam also gave special diversifiers to work with as extra “challenges”. One of these diversifiers, Final Countdown, requires you to make a completely seperate game in the last hour of the Game Jam. So, being the lunatic I am, I made a new game (called VIRUS.exe) which relies on transmitting commands to characters in order to take control of a computer network.

If the two games I was involved in doesn’t show the variety of games, you can find the full list of games made here. If you want just the games made at Edge Hill, the full list is here. You can find the specific page for Hero Chronicle here and VIRUS.exe here.

This is one of the events that show that, should you take every opportunity you can, you can take part in many events you wouldn’t otherwise! To anyone who’s interested, I’ll see you at Global Game Jam 2019!

Arts Centre – February (Part 2)

(You can find part 1 of this segment here, which covers the first half of the month.)

With so many events going on, I actually needed to split this into two parts! So, if you’re planning ahead for mid-late February, here’s my personal picks for Arts Centre events!

 

Volume Please!
16th Feb 2018, 2:30pm

A personal account of untold history told through the lens of South African social history and black South African identities. Mxoli Norman’s play uses jazz to explore the relationship between father and son and is a poetic telling of a powerful story. TICKETS are FREE!

If you wanted to watch a play that combines a deep story and amazing music, I could not reccomend this more! Also, FREE TICKETS!

 

Joel Dommett
17th Feb 2018, 8:00pm

I’m A Celebrity… 2016 runner-up, international globetrotter, English Comedian of the Year finalist and SKINS contributor Joel Dommett is known for reducing sell out audiences into bouts of uncontrollable laughter. NOT TO BE MISSED!

It’s not only at special SU ights that you get to meet famous people! Plus, if you love a bit of comedy, here’s your fix!

 

Reverb
19th Feb 2018, 7:30pm

Reverb is a monthly interdisciplinary spoken word and open mic event featuring established writers and artists and providing an opportunity for emerging writers to present new work. FREE, just turn up!

If you enjoy listening to writers reading out their work – both established and emerging alike – then attend and show your support!

 

UK Launch of the Oxford Handbook of Arts and Wellbeing
23rd Feb 2018, 9:30am

Professor Vicky Karkou holds a Chair of Dance at Edge Hill University leading the research theme of arts and wellbeing. A qualified dance teacher, researcher and dance movement psychotherapist, she has lengthy experience of working with diverse clinical populations in different settings. FREE EVENT

Launch events seem to be plentiful at Edge Hill – if you wanna be one of the first, here’s one on your doorstep!

 

Jazz in The Red Bar
26th Feb 2018, 8:00pm

The Red Bar transforms into a cabaret style jazz club for The Phil Shotton Quartet. Join us for jazz standards from the 1930’s onwards and popular songs from the American songbook – swing music at its best! FREE – just turn up!

The second of this event in as many months, if you enjoy a good ol’ bit of Jazz, then mosey on down!

 

Even with all the events discussed in the two parts of this series, there are many more events going on! (Madness, I know!)
If none of the events here excite you, you can find the full list here!

Third Year Film and Television Production: First Semester Summary!

So here I am again, back talking to you about my modules. Today’s post is all about my first semester of my third year in Film and Television Production!

Currently, I’m in my last semester ever on uni which is very weird, but also exciting at the same time! So quite a bit has changed over this last semester, and I’ve learnt so much about university life which I can’t wait to share with you over the next couple of months! Anyway, as I did before in my first and second-year semester posts, I will be going through the modules, giving my opinion on each one, enjoy!
(Disclaimer: modules on this course are always changing so might be different or non-existent by the time you’re reading this blog post.)


Independent Film Production (Compulsory)
Short version: Great module, however, it’s a lot of work!

Independent Film Production enables you to work independently to produce a film of a professional standard. The Independent film genre gives students the experience of working within industry guidelines, producing a digital and HD film within the confines of a limited budget, with a larger production team and within a restricted timescale.”

Behind the scenes.

Long version: As the quote suggests, film production is all about creating a 10 to 15-minute short film. The module is marked in two parts: a production folder with trailer and the film itself. The folder is full of all your paperwork that you have completed while creating the film and includes important pieces of paperwork such as release forms and location scouting. This folder is submitted with a short trailer for your film and is worth 30% of your overall mark, as the film makes up the rest.

The pros of this module are: by the end of the process you have a finished product which you can add to your showreel, you learn a lot of new skills on set, working with new people can be fun and engaging as ideas of how to make the film can be formed over casual conversations, you can be as creative as you want as you’re writing the script, and it’s another chance to explore the technical role you’re most interested in, whether that be editing, writing or directing!  

However, this module does have cons, one of which is that it’s based on group work and some people in your group may not pull their own weight (an issue I found occurring within my own production) and unfortunately there is no way for you to change that as you can’t force people to work when they do not want to. Additionally, I personally did not find the lectures useful for myself, as I would have prefered to be filming instead of sitting through a lecture about making a film. Finally, it can be a bit of a juggling act with other modules as you have to work on all of them at once, and it’s sometimes hard to find the time to do that. Overall though, this module has taught me a lot about teamwork and what roles I enjoy doing in productions. Because of this production, I realised that I really enjoy directing, which I didn’t know beforehand, which has now led to me being the director of my TV show I am currently creating, so overall it worked out!  


Media Futures: (Optional)
Short version: I didn’t really like this module.

Media Futures involves the study of contemporary media practices, the impact of technology on creative industries, developments in global and local media, and changing paradigms of media production and audience consumption. You will develop a critical awareness of a number of key themes including social experience and shaping of media forms, access, participation and engagement, and the relationship between public and private spheres. By considering these themes through a range of different theories and research, you will discover a variety of approaches to gaining understanding of what is a rapidly expanding frontier of creative and cultural practice and media knowledge.

Long version: As I’ve said before on these posts: “Theory isn’t for everyone, and I am the everyone in this situation.” And that has not changed one bit I am sorry to report, theory is still not my cup of tea. I can appreciate that essays are needed to make the degree legitimate, but at the same time I would much rather be doing practical work in all honesty, as I feel that suits my skill set much more. However, one thing that can be said is that the people teaching this module are passionate about what they are saying.

The module is marked with a 3000-word essay, worth 70% and a group debate, worth 30%. The debate was a good exercise in public speaking which is always a good skill to have no matter where you work. It was also a nice change from essays as what was reached could be used later on to defend your point when someone tries to counteract. Overall all though, I just didn’t really connect with this module as I did with the next one.


Cult Cinema (Optional)
Short version: I loved this module!

Cult Cinema introduces you to films that are often marginalised in academic film discourse as a consequence of their modes of production, content or manner of consumption. The module theoretically explores the interrelated concepts of ‘cult’, ‘trash’ and ‘exploitation’ cinema.

Long version: Okay, so you know I said I didn’t like essays, that still stands, but I did enjoy the lesson. The module is marked on two essays: a 1500 word essay and a 2500 word essay.

 Okay so let’s just jump straight into the Pros: If you enjoy learning about film history, especially the weird side of it, this class is for you! Every week we’d sit and watch weird clips from old films and then analyzes them! And honestly, what other lesson lets you openly talk about all the bad movies you’ve watched free of judgment. Additionally, the teacher is amazing, having Andrea Wright as your teacher is so much fun, as she’s not afraid to throw her class into the deep end when it comes to the weird films made in the past. We also got to do movie quizzes where there were prizes and even if you didn’t win a tub of sweets was always being passed around the class. The biggest con, however, is, of course, the essays. And yes, I may have not written the best essays in that class, but I did have a lot of fun!


I hope you learned something from this post or at least found it interesting. There is a lot of other modules that I have not discussed as unfortunately, you can’t study them all, so please feel free to check out the website for the rest of them. Again thanks for reading, it means a lot to me.
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day: The End of the F***ing World (2017)

Arts Centre – February (Part 1)

Once again, the Arts Centre has an amazing lineup of shows ready for next month! So, I’ve sifted through the list, and here’s my personal recommendations!

 

Chinese New Year Celebration – Transition
2nd Feb 2018, 6:30pm

In celebration of Chinese New Year, Edge Hill’s Confucius Institute invite you to a live rock style concert with a difference. Transition is a three-piece British rock band who write their own songs and sing in Mandarin – a fusion of eastern and western musical influence!

If you like rock music, then you may enjoy this interesting twist!

 

Me! Me! Me!
6th Feb 2018, 8:00pm

According to Frank Wurzinger this is the best show ever to be created by a human being. Come and see for yourself!

“best show ever”… well, there’s only one way to find out!

 

Blade Runner 2049
7th Feb 2018, 7:30pm

Thirty years after the events of the first film, a new blade runner, LAPD Officer K (Ryan Gosling), unearths a long-buried secret that has the potential to plunge what’s left of society into chaos. Cert 15

I’ve never watched Blade Runner 2049 before, but I always hear people praising it. So, if you’re in the same boat as me, here’s your chance!

 

Daisy Johnson
13th Feb 2018, 7:30pm

Winner of the 2017 Edge Hill Short Story Prize, Daisy Johnson, is one of the finest upcoming young writers in the country. She will read from her weird and wonderful short story collection, Fen.

Of course, there’s slight bias due to it being about writing! But if you want to learn more about writing, here’s a good opportunity!

 

55th Annual Ann Arbor Film Festival Tour
15th Feb 2018, 7:30pm

Featuring a selection of international short films, this programme of experimental, animated and documentary film, includes The Interior, winner of the Michael Moore Award for Best Documentary Film. The Arts Centre is the only UK host for the sixth year running. TICKETS are FREE!

“55th Annual” and “only UK host for the sixth year running” make this seem like a must-see event! Plus, FREE TICKETS!

 

There’s many more events next month, so expect a part 2 for the rest!

York Aesthetica Film Festival Trip!

On Friday the media department hosted a trip to York’s film festival, which I was fortunately lucky enough to go on! The film festival was a long but enjoyable day, which is what I will be blogging about today, enjoy!


York Aesthetica Film Festival, or otherwise known as ASFF, is a BAFTA-recognised short film festival that takes place annually at the beginning of November in York. The festival includes film screenings, industry masterclasses, hosted networking sessions and panel discussions.


This was my third year attending the festival through the university, this being my favourite year by far! Overall, this is the festival’s seventh year running, screening films in 18 different venues across the city, it was quite popular this year. The university has run this trip every year I have been here, and for £5, you can’t go wrong. 


We started our journey at the university, in Creative Edge at 7:30. On arrival, we were given lanyards and masterclass tickets. The masterclass you attend is your own choice as when you order the ticket through the university, you are given a choice of topics to choose from. Examples of the masterclasses which the festival offers are on topics such as casting, director, camerawork and advertising.


Setting off from the University at 8 o’clock, we travelled to york on two coaches, and 3 hours later we were there!  Arriving in York my group headed embarked to the York Theatre Royal to watch the thriller selection. Turns out the theatre was very close to the car park we were dropped off at, so got there in record time to watch the judges favourite short films that were entered this year. After watching those films, we stayed and watched the thriller selection.

My 3 top picks from the festival out of the films I watched were:

  • Second to None: A gory stop-motion comedy about the oldest man in the world and his twin brother, which was made in Ireland
  • Gridlock: A thriller about a little girl who goes missing during a traffic jam on a country road. (This one was amazing!) Again, made in Ireland.
  • Wash Club: A thriller about a journalism student who discovers a tumble drier cult on campus. The film was made in the Uk.

Overall the trip was super fun, I got to watch all the films I wanted to and afterwards I got to hang out in York, going to an all you can eat and the York dungeon with my friends! For the price of the trip, I’d easily recommend it to anyone as even if you don’t think you’ll watch many films with your pass, you can still get out there and discover York, which many people did. The bus journey home was silent, as everyone was either asleep or listening to music, it was peaceful, it was sweet, and it was the perfect way to end the day.


Thanks for reading this post, I hope you found it somewhat interesting. Feel free to comment on topics you’d like me to talk about.
Until next time!  

Film /Show of the day: Arrested Development (2003-)

My Timetable! – 2nd Year Film and Television Production

For today’s blog post as the title would suggest, I am going to be talking about my timetable. This might seem like an odd thing to do but strangely enough, it’s the type of question I get asked a lot.

“How many days are you in a week?”
“How long are your lessons?”
“Do you have much work to do outside of lessons? “.
So I hope with this blog post I am able to answer some of these questions!
Of course, this timetable is just for my course, Film and Television Production, so other courses will vary. Also feel free to check out my last post to find out more about my course!

(Disclaimer: The timetable alters occasionally from week to week to accommodate coursework deadlines, and in class tests if needed)  

Tuesday: Research for Film and Television

“Research for Film and Television develops your skills in academic research. The module surveys a range of research methods and equips you with the necessary skills to undertake a film and television focused research project.”

9:00: Time to wake up and get ready for the day ahead.
10:30: Walk to lecture with friends, as I live in the town and not on campus, so have to allow walking time.

Inside Creative Edge

11:00 – 1:00: Lecture time ~ This module is purely essay based, so revolves around lectures and seminars. The lectures are all about research methods such as focus groups and surveys, their uses, efficiency and limitations.
2:00: Seminar time ~ This is a time to take a more in-depth look at what we have just studied in lecture, in smaller groups, and ask any questions if needed.
3:00 End of the learning day!

Outside lesson work:
As with every module, you are expected to work outside of class time on your coursework. For this module this means essay work which includes researching, writing essay plans, reading through your notes, conducting research groups and, of course, actually writing the essays themselves.

 


Wednesday: Documentary

“Welcome to the Real World: Documentary Production offers you the opportunity to research, develop and produce a short documentary film that could be considered for submission to a festival or competition or for exhibition over an alternative platform.”


7:30: 
Wake up and get ready.
8:30: Time to walk to uni! Tip: Try to find a group of people you know to walk with, as it’ll make the journey feel a little shorter, this can be flatmates, people on other courses who are in uni the same time as you, or people on your course doing the same module as you or not. It’ll make you feel a lot more social, wake you up more, and prepare you for the day ahead! 
9:00 – 1:00:
 Lecture time ~  The lectures are completely theory and is all about the history of documentary, and what elements are needed to create a good documentary. Additionally, there are practical screening of groups tasks, and group/individual pitches.
1:00: Seminar time ~ This follows straight after the lecture and is a time for production groups to get together and have a group meeting to see where they are at in the production process and plan what they’re going to do next. While all the groups are having their meetings, two lectures go around the groups, finding out what progress the groups have made, give advice accordingly and discuss what the next step of their production should be. 
2:00: End of the learning day!

Outside lesson work:
There is a lot of outside work for this module as it’s very production heavy, which requires you to do a lot of research and planning into your chosen documentary as you have to find the story, interviewees, film it and edit the documentary. There is also deadlines every week for production folder work such as script outlines, filming dates, health and safety forms, rushes, transcriptions etc. Additionally, there is a reflective report (essay) for this module, which counts towards your overall grade.


Thursday: Advanced Post Production

“Advanced Post Production develops your skills of editing and forms the basis your practical and conceptual understanding of digital non-linear editing, using industry standard software.”

8:20: Wake up time!
9:30: Walk to uni with friends.
10:00:
 Seminar time ~ Unlike most of my modules on this course, the lesson layout for advanced post-production differs greatly as the seminar is split into two. The first half is used to teach the class how to do an editing technique. Meanwhile, the second half gives you the time to mess about with it and practice it more, with help on standby if you didn’t grasp it the first time or have any questions about the software.
11:00: Lecture time ~ The lectures are theory based and cover the origins of film editing and movements through the eras.
12:00: Seminar time ~ Back to the editing room to practice the technique we learnt earlier!
1:00: End of the learning day!

Outside lesson work:
Again, there is a lot of outside work to do with this module, as it has both coursework and exam elements. The coursework is a portfolio, which requires a lot of outside class hours to create and perfect. As well as studying of course for the exam.


I hope you enjoyed this post and found it a useful insight into what university timetables can be like, as people assume that it’s similar to high school or sixth form which is not the case, as shown above, there’s a lot more emphasis on independent learning and working outside of class hours. Thanks for reading and I hope you have an amazing week.
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day: Big Fish (2003)

Second Year Film and Television Production: Second Semester Summary!

So here I am again, back talking to you about my modules, however, unlike last time this is all about my second semester of my second year in Film and Television Production!
Technically, today is my last academic day of second year, which is super scary yet exciting at the same time! So quite a bit has changed over this last academic year, and I’ve learnt so much about myself as a person, which I can’t wait to share with you over the next couple of months! Anyway, as I did before in my first-semester post, I will be going through the modules, giving my opinion on each one, enjoy!
(Disclaimer: modules on this course are always changing so might be different or non-existent by the time you’re reading this blog post.)

 


Advanced Post Production: (Optional)
Short version: Great module, however, it’s a lot of work!

“Advanced Post Production develops your skills of editing and forms the basis your practical and conceptual understanding of digital non-linear editing, using industry standard software.”

Long version: As the quote suggests, advanced post-production is all about learning how to edit using premiere pro and the history surrounding editing.
The module is marked in two parts: a portfolio of weekly tasks and an exam.
The exam is made up of content from the module reading list, lectures and practical exercises, and is worth 30% of your overall mark, as the portfolio makes up the rest.
The portfolio is comprised of 5 tasks:

  • Exercise 1 Manipulating Media (10%):  This task is about manipulating pictures using keyframes, creating movement in your images.
  • Exercise 2 Using Keyframes (10%): For this task, you learn to blur a face and must go out and record footage of your own for this piece.
  • Exercise 3 Multicamera Editing (10%): As the excise suggest, you learn how to edit multiple camera feeds together, and you must record your own footage for this task.
  • Exercise 4 Factual Production Techniques (60%): This is the main part of your portfolio and is a 3-minute factual video about any element of editing history you chose to do it on. It must include an interview, a narration, images, video, titles and music.
  • Exercise 5 Audio Dub (10%): For this task, you pick one minute of a three-minute video provided to source all the audio for and edit into the scene.

The pros of taking the module are: the lectures are great allowing you to learn more of the historical side of editing which is super interesting and fun. The seminars are taught in a way which allows you to learn at your own speed without the added pressure of messing up, and allows you to ask questions if you get stuck, which most of the time you won’t need to as the lecturers are great at teaching people how to use the software. Additionally, there is one-on-one support if needed throughout creating your portfolio.

However, this module does have it’s cons, one of which is that you have to record all the footage and audio you use for the task, which can be difficult on times as it can be a bit of a juggling act with other modules as you have to work on all of them at once, and it’s sometimes hard to find the time to do that. Also, you can only edit on campus, which has been an issue for some people I know.

Overall though, this module is a great introduction into editing and it’s techniques. And I have found it an extremely useful skill to have as I have already used the skills I have learnt in this module, in another one of my modules. So I’d highly recommend this one if you’re a budding editor, or just want to try your hand at something new!


Research for Film and Television: (Compulsory)
Short version: I still don’t like this module.

“Research for Film and Television develops your skills in academic research. The module surveys a range of research methods and equips you with the necessary skills to undertake a film and television focused research project.”

Long version: As I stated last time I talked about this module: “Theory isn’t for everyone, and I am the everyone in this situation.” And that has not changed one bit I am sorry to report, theory is still not my cup of tea. I can appreciate that essays are needed to make the degree legitimate, but at the same time I would much rather be doing practical work in all honesty, as I feel that suits my skill set much more. Essay wise, I’m still not very interested in this module as it’s veered quite a bit away from film and more into different methods of research, which is great if you enjoy sociology, but I would much rather be analysing films.

On a happier note, this module has taught me one very important thing which is I am not the type of person who is suited to do a dissertation, it’s just not for me, which I’m super happy I’ve found out now. As sometimes it’s nice to find out your weaknesses as it helps you find out what your strengths are. Because of this, I will not be doing a dissertation in my third year and instead will be taking two modules in it’s place! (Speaking about third-year modules, I’m planning on writing a ‘First impressions’ post, next month about the modules I’ve chosen and what I hope to learn from them, so keep an eye out for that!)


Documentary (Optional)
Short version: Love the idea of it, however practically it can be a bit messy.

“Welcome to the Real World: Documentary Production offers you the opportunity to research, develop and produce a short documentary film that could be considered for submission to a festival or competition or for exhibition over an alternative platform.”

Long version: Documentary has been a real whirlwind of a module. It’s been jam-
packed from start to finish
, and stressful on times. But overall, I’m glad that I chose this module. It didn’t sugar coat anything and taught me how to deal with issues as they arise.

The main part of the coursework for this module is a 3 – 5 minute documentary around the theme “What matters?”. For this, I chose to create a documentary about autism which was really interesting to film!
Additionally, there were a couple of filming exercises, one of which was a one-minute stills documentary, which you have to write about in a reflective report (essay).
The pros of taking this module are: you get to research and learn more about the topic you’ve chosen to create a documentary about which is really interesting. Making the documentary itself, as at the end of the process you can add it to your showreel and hopefully be proud of it. And finally, it’s a chance to experiment with a new art form as making a documentary is very different than making a normal scripted film.

The cons however of taking documentary is that the module is very group work heavy, so teamwork is an issue on times if everyone isn’t working efficiency. Deadlines can stress you out and can creep up on you, as there is a lot to plan and organise. And finally, as I said before, it can be a juggling act with other modules on times as the module demands a lot of you, especially as I’m the director in my group. Overall, this module is rewarding if you love documentaries as much as I do, as you need to be motivated and prepared to put the hours in, as all the work and stress is totally worth it when you have the finished product in your hand!


I hope you learned something from this post or at least found it interesting. There is a lot
of other modules that I have not discussed as unfortunately, you can’t study them all, so please feel free to check out the website for the rest of them.
Again thanks for reading and following me through this academic year, it means a lot to me! I’m currently writing a post about my academic timetable as I get asked a lot about how many hours I have to be on campus for each week, so stayed tuned for that!
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day: Pleasantville (1998)

My Experience with Vibe Radio

As many of you know by now, I partake in quite a few things at the uni, one of which I’ll be sharing with you today, which is Vibe Radio.


For those of you who don’t know, Edge Hill have their own radio station which is part of
Vibe media, and in my first year I produced a radio show with three of my friends called ‘Reel Talk’. Our show was two hours of soundtracks, quizzes, and conversations about movies and tv shows, which was super fun. Our weekly show was hosted by myself and my friend Emma, and each week had a theme e.g action, romance, horror, etc.   


Secret Santa gifts which we opened on air.

One of the best parts about the radio show is that you can play and do pretty much whatever you want as long as it’s not offensive. This made the experience of writing the weekly script/schedule for the show fun as we could be as creative as we wanted with it. Additionally, anyone can have a radio show, regardless of your course, as long as you’ve signed up for Vibe, you’re good to go!


Posing with the Mayor.

My favourite part of doing the radio show though was when we were given the opportunity to host a charity fun run at the uni. When we volunteered to host the event we didn’t really know what to expect, just that we needed to create a playlist of songs, however, when we got there and got handed the mics, we found out a lot more was required of us.
Our job for the whole event was to cheer people on while also playing DJ, which was so much fun as we ended up having jokes with the runners who came in, and with the spectators. Also, we met the mayor of west Lancashire which was pretty cool.


However the best moment of the day happened near the end of the event. Everyone thought the last runner had gone through and everyone was packing things away and going home, until one of the organisers came over to us and inform us that one person had yet to finish the race. So we waited for this one runner to make it to the end, which felt so long. Just looking over the empty running track while listening to ‘We Are the Champion’, wondering if this lost runner was ever going to find their way back, when suddenly we saw them. As they slowly made their way to the end of the race with myself and Emma’s support, we jumped onto the track so they wouldn’t finish the race alone. And that is how I ended up running a marathon, and I still have the medal to this day.


So if there is anything to take away from this post, it’s that: Vibe radio is pretty cool and worth a try if you’re interested in podcasts or anything such as that and to take every opportunity that gets thrown at you as you might accidentally end up running a marathon event at the end of it all.
I hope you all have an amazing week,
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day: The Room (2003) 

Second Year Film and Television Production: First Semester Summary!

So here it is. Here are my thoughts on my first semester of my second year in Film and Television Production! A bit late I know, but you know what they say, ‘better late than never’. As I did before in my first-year summary post, I will be going through the modules, giving my opinion on each one, enjoy!  
(Disclaimer: modules on this course are always changing so might be different or non-existent by the time you’re reading this blog post.)


Genre Filmmaking: (Optional)  
Short version: The module was good, the teamwork side of it not so much.

Genre Filmmaking develops your knowledge and experience of the technical, creative, organisational and practical demands involved in genre film production. The overarching theme of the module is the development of the creative processes in relation to genre. Genre filmmaking gives you the opportunity to test out ideas or tell a story within the boundaries of generic conventions. In addition, you will need to think critically about genre in the context of your production.

Long version: I have mixed opinions on this module, as I somewhat liked it in places, but

A screenshot from my film.

I did find it stressful in places due to the heavy focus on teamwork, because if members of your group don’t want to work, you’ve got to do their share of the work in most cases, which unfortunately happened a lot to me.
For this module, there is two pieces of coursework: a 10-minute group pitch and a 5-minute film with all the required paperwork. The pitch went really well overall, as you can get extra marks for being theatrical, so my group dressed up as the victims from our comedy/horror film, with fake blood and all.
The film, on the other hand, had many complications tied to it, as the footage shot had many errors with it, so it made my job of editing it needlessly stressful. But with everything said and done, the film got a first, so overall there’s a happy ending to this story.


Analysing Film and Television: (Compulsory)
Short version: I don’t really like this module.

“Analysing Film and Television develops your skills in the close analysis of film and television. The module surveys a range of critical approaches to the study of film and television institutions, texts and audiences. You will gain the skills necessary to develop and undertake analysis as part of a film and/or television research project.”

Creative Edge lecture theatre.

Long version: Theory isn’t for everyone, and I am the everyone in this situation. This isn’t the first time I’ve studied films in this way, my whole media A Level comprised of this sort of analysis. But for some reason this time I wasn’t very engaged, which could mostly be down to the fact that I’m a very hands-on sort of worker, I like to have a finished product at the end of it all I can be proud of. Unfortunately, most people on my course also seem to struggle with this theory module because just like me, they’re very practical. And the whole module is marked on essays.
On a happier note, I got to learn more about the male gaze and studies around this topic, which I loved, as I find it interesting to learn about the representation of women in the media industry, as spoilers: it can be very phallocentric (all about men) on times. Which hopefully will change, one woman at a time!  


Screenwriting: (Optional)
Short version: I loved this module!  

Screenwriting develop your understanding of the theory and craft of screenwriting and will include consideration of story, narrative structure, character, setting, dialogue, original screenplay and adaptation.  The module enables you to demonstrate your creative potential via the development of and reflection on their ideas and scripts.”

Long version: Okay where do I begin. First off I’m an aspiring screenwriter, making this module a big must when it came to picking modules. However, I didn’t know how much this module would impact my writing.
There is two pieces of coursework you are marked on for this module which is a 3-minute pitch about the script you plan to write, and the finished script with development materials (log line, character biographies, etc).
When I heard that we had to pitch in front of the whole class I was not happy, as I sometimes struggle to talk in front of crowds, but what made it worse was the fact that we couldn’t have a powerpoint and it had to all my memorised, I’m terrible at that. However, against all odds, I did one of the best pitches in my course, which is honestly crazy to me. Which goes to show that a lot of preparation and rehearsing of these types of things always helps. And now my fear of pitching has dropped by quite a bit, I still get butterflies, but that’s natural and actually helps me to do my best.  
So now that’s out of the way all I had to do was write the script, which I loved doing, once I was on a roll there was no stopping me, which was part of the issue. I wrote 16 pages, for a 10-page script… so that took a lot of editing down.
But I can honestly say I’ve taken four key things away from this module:

  1. How to format a script, as I kinda knew, but not to a professional standard.
  2. Short films don’t have to be complex, as most great short films are one place, one time.
  3. Only keep what is crucial to the story when writing short films – waffling can occur on times when you’re writing without you even realising it, so is something you have to keep an eye on when editing!  
  4. And finally, I learned that it’s best to follow what you think is right than what other people think sometimes. I was headstrong with my idea and it paid off, I took on people’s critics and changed when needed, but never compromised on what I wanted. Which is probably why I got a first overall for this module, who knows.But to summarise: screenwriting is an awesome module if you love to write and want to turn that love into a skill!

I hope you learned something from this post or at least found it interesting. There is a lot of other modules that I have not discussed as unfortunately, you can’t study them all, so please feel free to check out the website for the rest of them. I’m currently studying documentary and advanced post-production, so stay tuned for that post!
Until next time!

Film/Show of the day: Planet Earth II (2016-)