So You Want to be a Combined Honours Student?

Being a combined or joint honours student has a lot of advantages that may benefit you over being a single honours student. As a Creative writing and English literature student I have had a lot of experience in both subjects and that has really helped me so far in my degree. Having the option of a joint honours can be incredibly beneficial if you enjoy more than one subject or aren’t quite sure exactly what you want to specialise in. In this post I will explain a little bit about my experience as a joint student and bust a few of the myths you may have come across when researching courses.

Advantages

In my experience I have found that there are a lot of advantages to being a joint/combined honours student, such as;

  • You get to learn skills in two different subjects that often complement each other.
  • You will be able to bring new and different ideas to both subjects.
  • It’s a good way to develop your adjustment skills and work to being more flexible. with your work, as you will complete assignments for both subjects that have different requirements.

Myth Busting

Now, you may hear a lot about studying a joint/combined honours degree that may not necessarily be true;

  • It’s more work than a single honours degree – Actually, in my experience, the work load is very similar, if not the same as those of my friends who are just studying single creative writing or literature. The only difference is that you may have a few deadlines at same time and thus have an influx of different assignments, but if you handle your workload it will be no harder.
  • It’s less of a qualification – Nope. It is just as valid as a single honours.
  • You do more modules than a single honours student – At least In my degree I study three modules in creative writing and three in English literature, as opposed to all six in one subject. If you were studying major/minor you would have more modules in your major subject but they would always add up to the same amount of modules as a single student in your field.

Final Advice

The biggest piece of advice I can give is to research thoroughly into what you want to study and get as much information as possible before applying. A joint honours degree may not be for everyone, as a single honours degree may not be, it’s up to you to figure out which you’d enjoy most and which would benefit you most. For more information on different courses you can visit the UCAS website, the subject page of the Edge Hill website and The Complete University Guide’s page on choosing your course.

Good luck to all those who have applied and to those beginning to look for a university course 🙂

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