Our team

Being Me with IBD study team:

The multi-disciplinary and inter-disciplinary Being Me with IBD study team brings together a range of expertise in working to improve the lives of children, young people and families through influencing practice, policy, and public engagement. We have experience of working across various sectors in researching health, loneliness and wellbeing and in engaging young people through this work. You can find out more about the Edge Hill staff here: https://www.edgehill.ac.uk/health/research/children-young-people-families/

Professor Bernie Carter

I am one of the Principal Investigators for the Being Me with IBD study.

You can find me on Twitter @CarterBernie.

 

Professor Lucy Bray

I am a member of the IBD study team and work at Edge Hill University.

You can find me on Twitter @Lucybray9.

 

Professor Pamela Qualter.

I am a co-investigator for the Being Me with IBD study and work at The University of Manchester.

You can find out more about my work here: https://www.research.manchester.ac.uk/portal/pamela.qualter.html

 

Dr Ali Rouncefield-Swales

I am the Research Fellow for the Being Me with IBD study and work at Edge Hill University.

You can find me on Twitter @alirouncefield

Dr Lucy Blake

I am a Senior Lecturer, researcher for the Being Me with IBD study and work at Edge Hill University.

You can find me on Twitter @lb377

Alder Hey site team

The “Being Me” study is one of several studies looking at inflammatory bowel disease in younger people at Alder Hey. These include collaborating in “registry” studies that monitor IBD and its response to treatment over time, a study evaluating an “electronic nose” in initial diagnosis and also a study starting soon to see whether the first milk of cows helps to improve gut health in Crohn’s disease.

Professor Stephen Allen – Chair in Paediatrics

Becky and Janet – Gastroenterology Research Nurses

Royal Liverpool Hospital site team

We enjoy collaborating with “Being Me”. We have several other studies in the area of IBD – offering patients new drugs via commercial studies and our own therapeutic trails; observational studies of genes and proteins that may influence the course of disease and predict response to therapy; studies of the faecal gases and the bacteria and fungi that contribute to their production and trigger attacks of IBD; as well as various “registry” studies.

Professor Chris Probert – Professor of Gastroenterology

Alvyda – Gastroenterology Research Nurse

St Marks Hospital site team

Kay Crook – Paediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist