Personal Development Planning (PDP) ‘Steps to Success’

The approach to Personal Development Planning (PDP) via the ‘Steps to Success’ model

What happens?

This model offers a theoretical representation of the PDP when aligned to the University’s employability themes, and the development of the student in relation to their research knowledge and capacity. The PDP is designed to align to the student journey and has been embedded across levels 4, 5 and 6.  Given the embedded nature of this model, there is therefore potential for other settings to transfer this same model into their own curriculum.

 

What is the likely impact?

Students have been able to visualise the PDP and recognise its value in their development. The students have been completing the PDP as a natural part of their student journey and as such, the PDP has become integral to their development.

To book to attend a Professional Staff Development Seminar on this topic please click here CLT.

For more information please contact:

Hayley McKenzie, mckenzih@edgehill.ac.uk

Laura Ashton, ashtonl@edgehill.ac.uk

Shelly Haslam, haslamsh@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing; MSc Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing – Stage 2].

Engaging students

The integration of the students’ role both in the identification of placements and in their feedback on placement experience back into the teaching within the programme

What happens?

It was felt that students should be central to decision-making about placements. Where they may already be involved with placements, having them share these experiences was felt to be beneficial to the programme.

Using their placement experiences will add a depth and richness to the class discussions and is anticipated to deepen the value of learning on placements. Having students engaged in approaching placement providers adds ownership to that placement and develops their own networking skills, which is transferable to all settings.

What is the likely impact?

Directly, this will support improving placement opportunities by widening the resource base; it may indirectly also lead to enhancing learning from placement. Giving students choice and capacity to approach placement providers is expected to provide opportunity for reflection and personal development.

For more information please contact:

Shelly Haslam, haslamsh@edgehill.ac.uk

Gemma Holloway, Gemma.Holloway@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing; MSc Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing – Stage 1].

Creative assessment

The creativity of assessment, specifically the use of imagery and visualisation in presentations

What happens?

Given the nature of the student cohort and their potential future careers, it was felt necessary to ensure that they were able to convey information using a range of mediums, in particular the use of imagery and visualisation. This assessment method is designed to support students in enhancing their effective communication, creativity and presentation skills. Other settings could equally apply this approach in an attempt to broaden their students’ ability to transmit information in alternative formats.

What is the likely impact?

Directly, this assessment method will develop students’ skills and abilities in communicating information using various mediums, developing and enhancing presentation skills and mastering the use of imagery to convey meaning.

To book to attend a Professional Staff Development Seminar on this topic please click here CLT.

For more information please contact Shelly Haslam, haslamsh@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing; MSc Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing – Stage 1].

Supporting transitions

Activities to support transitions between levels 4-6, and into employment and further study

What happens?

Discrete sessions dedicated to student transitions that are personalised to reflect the cohort’s and individual students’ previous experiences and achievements as well as feeding forward towards the next level of studies.

This feature is fully transferable to any full-time undergraduate programme of studies.

What is the impact?

Positive impact on student academic achievement and personal well-being; positive impact on student retention; high levels of student satisfaction.

For more information please contact Tim Lucas, Lucast@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BA (Hons) Working and Teaching in the Early Years – Stage 2].

The concept and execution of an ‘induction year’

The concept and execution of an ‘induction year’

What happens?

In comparison to other settings, the concept of an ‘induction year’ has been made explicit within the programme as the one of the key components of the programme’s delivery and student support strategy. This feature is fully transferable to any full-time undergraduate programme of studies.

What is the likely impact?

Positive impact on student academic achievement and personal well-being; positive impact on student retention; high levels of student satisfaction.

 

For more information please contact Liana Beattie, Beattiel@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BA (Hons) Working and Teaching in the Early Years – Stage 2].

Supporting transitions with assessment

Promoting students’ understanding of assessment (marking and feedback) at key transition points within the programme

What happens?

At the transition points within the programme (induction; L4 to L5; L5 to L6) students will be led through a session which supports them in understanding the increased academic expectations and the Department’s approach to providing them with feedback and feedforward. This is also an opportunity to ‘manage’ students’ expectations and understanding of what constitutes ‘fair’ marking and ‘useful’ comments (NSS questions).

What is the likely impact?

Students are supported in preparing for or anticipating the changes in expectations between levels. Their academic outcomes should then be improved.

For more information about the impact of this strategy please contact:                          Nichola Callander (Assistant Head of Department) Callandn@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BA (Hons) Working with Children 5-11].

Alumni to support transitions and improve retention

As part of the Department’s Careers and Employability Week for all Level 5 and 6 students, the Department engages with alumni, particularly their involvement in the Careers and Employability Week and fieldtrips

What happens?

A number of alumni deliver short presentations on their career path since graduation and how they have applied the knowledge and skills gained during their degree. The alumni also attend an informal networking event with the students immediately after the presentations. The Department has also begun to develop links with alumni for field visits to sites where ‘real world’ examples of environmental management practice can be observed.

What was the impact?

Site visits enhance students’ learning by actually seeing approaches and techniques that they are aware of from class teaching being used in practice.

This approach increases the students’ awareness of the importance of the skills (and knowledge and understanding) that they are developing and practising during their degree for future employment. A key message is also the need to record evidence of skills development in a portfolio or equivalent.

 

For more information please contact:

Dr Nigel Richardson, richardn@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Geoenvironmental Hazards – Stage 2].