High fidelity simulation: Using to technology to enhance simulation in Paramedic Practice

High fidelity simulation: Using to technology to enhance simulation in Paramedic Practice 

“The paramedic team have recently been experimenting with simulation and social media to simulate techniques that replicate ‘real-world’ activities and provides students with the opportunity to explore their own learning in a controlled environment.  It can be difficult to ensure both the fidelity and the relevance of a simulation in a simulation or clinical skills.

The utilisation of technology can increase the immersion of a student in simulation. Recreation of an environment can allow the student to practice skills in a safe space with the feel of working in practice, creating an unpredictable event in a predictable environment.  The use of patient monitors and mannequins that produce a life-like props that can be controlled by the academic, but interacted with by the student, can further add to this. 

 

If you interested in using this technology or looking to explore innovation in your area please get in touch or come and see us … we are presenting our current work at the SOLSTICE Conference which is being held at Edge Hill University on 4th and 5th June 2019. 

Barry Matthews and Rory Mc Kelvin are Lecturer’s in Paramedic Practice and Pre-hospital Care is based at St.James, Edge Hill University’s Manchester Campus.

Alternative assessment

The Department proposes to collaborate with the Department of Computer Science to explore the potential use of the CAVE resource for developing virtual field trips to 3D landscapes, simulating natural and environmental hazard scenarios etc., to support and enhance students’ experience of fieldwork and hazard management.

What is the likely impact?

Such virtual fieldtrips would allow students to begin to explore a field setting in preparation for residential fieldwork, and to develop research questions for project work in advance of the fieldwork. This would provide an experience of field locations which may be inaccessible for some disabled students. For hazard management, it may allow for different hazard scenarios to be simulated and for students to interact directly with the situation as part of their learning of risk and hazard/ disaster management. Such an approach would enhance interactive learning between students.

The Team’s collaboration with the Computer Science Department to utilise the C.A.V.E resource, particularly in relation to alternative assessment arrangements for disabled students

For more information please contact:

Dr Nigel Richardson, richardn@edgehill.ac.uk

Dr Irene Delgado-Fernandez, delgadoi@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Geoenvironmental Hazards – Stage 2].