Working Lunch!

What happens?

At this time of year with placements looming and assessment deadlines on the horizon, not to mention 1st Teaching Posts to apply for, time is of the essence.

So to support students during this potentially difficult period of time, over in Design and Technology teaching spaces are booked over the lunch period, which provides not only a few hours per week of additional contact time, but helps to create and maintain a collegiate, industrious working atmosphere.

Staff stay around after the formal contact time and are on hand to offer additional support, which also at this frantic period in the students journey is very much appreciated by the students.

What are the benefits? 

This approach has proven to contribute positively to the students attendance, engagement, attainment, and also has had a positive impact on the students general feelings of well-being.

Working lunches have proven to be so popular where possible students have also been coming in early for ‘breakfast club’!

For more information about the benefits of this initiative on students well-being, engagement and attainment please contact:

David Wooff, Wooffd@edgehill.ac.uk

 

Supporting students on work placement

The Department’s implementation of the academic post of Practice Education Lecturer to support the management of placements and the student experience

What happens?

This provides a physical FoHSC academic presence in the work-based learning area that facilitates open communication between placement, student and programme team. This enables effective and timely potential for problem solving/ information sharing on behalf of the student or the area itself. The quality role ensures that potential placement areas are suitable for individual students and can assist in ‘matching’ of placements to individual programmes. An auditing process ensures that we are at present providing high-quality placements focusing on the safety of our students. New placements have been identified, and more information regarding placement student capacity has been confirmed.

What is the impact?

Students have already fed back that they feel supported by the presence of the PEL. Open communication is enhanced. Expectations of the aims of the placement experience have been clearer. Academic member of staff ensures that any minor/ major academic issues impacting on students’ progression are addressed in a timely manner. This results in a better quality of work-based learning opportunities.

To book to attend a Professional Staff Development Seminar on this topic please click here CLT.

For more information please contact: 

Carol Wilson

wilsonc@edgehill.ac.uk

Gemma Holloway

Gemma.Holloway@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing; MSc Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing – Stage 2].

‘Transition Days’

The format and content of ‘Transition Days’ at Levels 4 to 5, and 5 to 6

What happens?

The transition days offer students the opportunity to attend sessions, outside of semester one and two, to learn and be informed about the transition they will be making, academically and also personally, between either levels 4-5 or 5-6 in their student journey.

All undergraduate students will face these transitions, which include the jump in academic expectation, personal demands, the need for resilience and their destination planning; as such, it is felt that the transition days could be an integral part of all programmes across the University.

What is the likely impact?

Students are able to see their own journey, to assess their current skills base, and to consider where they might need help and support in moving to the next stage of their academic journey. The sessions are very practical and are designed to offer students the ability to start planning ahead for the next academic year.

To book to attend a Professional Staff Development Seminar on this topic please click here CLT.

For more information please contact Hazel Flight, flighth@edgehill.ac.uk  or Peter Leadbetter

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing – Stage 2].

Using Blackboard Collaborate for personal tutorials

The use of Blackboard Collaborate for personal tutorials including those students who are studying remotely

What happens?

The use of the full range of tools in Collaborate has enabled us in the MaST team to devote personal time to students, focusing on their specific needs, and at times that suit them.  It provides an opportunity for formative feedback on work-in-progress in a way that is as close as possible to the experience of having a face-to-face tutorial. This practice has been used by tutors in the MaST team to very good avail. It has also been used by some tutors on the outgoing MA Education, and its use will be continued in the newly-validated MA Educational Enquiry and Professional Learning.

What is the impact?

At each module evaluation students have mentioned the way in which they have valued this provision, particularly given the work and personal commitments many have. Further, it helps elaborate and provide clarification on written feedback, which students may sometimes need.

 

To book to attend a Professional Staff Development Workshop on this topic please click here CLT.

For further information abut the impact of this strategy please contact:

Victoria Grinyer, grinyerv@edgehill.ac.uk

Andrea Taylor, tayloraa@edgehill.ac.uk

Sue Bailey, baileys@edgehill.ac.uk

Dr Mary McAteer, mcateerm@edgehill.ac.uk

 

[SOURCE: MA Educational Enquiry and Professional Learning – Stage 2].