Enrichment opportunities

The student-led Midwifery Society which is supported by the Department to enrich the student learning experience

What happens?

The Midwifery Society creates a recognised forum to develop an EHU community for student midwives. A Society with elected committee members promotes communication among peers and enhances a collegiate approach to sharing knowledge. In addition, a recognised forum raises the profile of the University through a series of study events and conferences at reduced/ minimal costs.

Attendance at study events/ conferences organised by the Midwifery Society has encouraged members of the Society to participate in evidence-based learning and networking opportunities. This year, the Society has organised two study events attracting national speakers at significantly reduced costs for members. Additionally, the Society has facilitated the second annual ‘mentor in practice awards’. This positive event strengthens the department’s relationship with practice placement providers.

This year, the President of the Society was a finalist for the national Student Midwife of the Year 2017 award from the Royal College of Midwives.

For further information please contact the President of the Midwifery Society by visiting:

https://www.edgehillsu.org.uk/groups/midwifery-society–5

https://en-gb.facebook.com/EHUMidwiferySociety/

https://twitter.com/EHUMidwifery

[SOURCE: MSc Midwifery].

Placement support app

What happens?

This app, which will be piloted from September 2017, is proposed to provide support and useful information to 3rd year students whilst on placement. It will enable them to have instant access to and understand issues such as safeguarding and conflict resolution. Practical details such as travel information will also be included.

What is the likely impact?

Students will have valuable information at their fingertips, enabling them to feel more confident in the placement area.

The new placement support app which has been developed in collaboration with the Computer Science department.

Following this pilot a professional staff development workshop will be scheduled, please see the CLT website to book your place and for immediate further information please contact:

Hayley McKenzie,mckenzih@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Global Public Health – Stage 2].

Personal Development Planning (PDP) ‘Steps to Success’

The approach to Personal Development Planning (PDP) via the ‘Steps to Success’ model

What happens?

This model offers a theoretical representation of the PDP when aligned to the University’s employability themes, and the development of the student in relation to their research knowledge and capacity. The PDP is designed to align to the student journey and has been embedded across levels 4, 5 and 6.  Given the embedded nature of this model, there is therefore potential for other settings to transfer this same model into their own curriculum.

 

What is the likely impact?

Students have been able to visualise the PDP and recognise its value in their development. The students have been completing the PDP as a natural part of their student journey and as such, the PDP has become integral to their development.

To book to attend a Professional Staff Development Seminar on this topic please click here CLT.

For more information please contact:

Hayley McKenzie, mckenzih@edgehill.ac.uk

Laura Ashton, ashtonl@edgehill.ac.uk

Shelly Haslam, haslamsh@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing; MSc Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing – Stage 2].

Supporting mentor-assessors

Comprehensive support for mentor-assessors (Supervisors) in practice including a training workshop and Supervisor Handbook

What happens?

Partnership working is not a new concept. However, with a new programme it is essential to support colleagues in practice to understand the demands of the programme for the workforce and how the students would be assessed in practice and the supervisors’ responsibility in their learning. Bespoke workshops have allowed for a good working relationship to be built and prepared supervisors for their role within this new programme. Written support with the supervisor handbook provides a guide to the programme and its assessment in practice that Supervisors can refer to at any time. The appointment of the Partnership Clinical Facilitators (PCF) at the HEI bridges the gap of support between University and Practice while the employment of the Practice Education Facilitator (PEF) by the partners supports the Supervisors and students in practice.

Any programme with a practice/ partnership element can easily adopt this model of preparation with prior planning.

What’s the impact?

This has a positive impact on students as it demonstrates a cohesive partnership between HEI and employer. Students are in a transition period and the knowledge of the Practice Supervisor of the programme and practice requirements indirectly assists in a smooth transition. Students are away from the HEI for 80% of the programme and the support in the practice area is vital. The introduction of a bespoke Practice Education Facilitator (PEF) for the students on this programme later in 2017 will also support both Supervisor and student whilst away from the HEI. The supportive roles of both PEF and PCF will have a positive direct impact on student support and learning. The role of the PCF acts as a learning advocate for the students in University and practice acting, as a link where required.

For more information please contact Elaine Hughes, hughese@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: FdSc Nursing Associate with level 6 BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care Conversion degree].

Supporting transition and retention with Peer Mentoring

Computer Science Peer Mentoring

To support transitions, student retention and develop graduate attributes the department of Computer Science offer an innovate peer mentoring system that involves mentoring throughout the student’s life from pre-entry into employment.

The Rationale

Many students coming to university will go through a transitional period.  They have to adapt to new ways of learning and teaching, as well as living away from home, often for the first time. The Department’s Mentor Scheme helps new students with this transition.

How it works

First year students (mentees) are matched to current undergraduate students; usually second years. They meet on a regular basis to discuss a wide range of issues such as:

  • new ways of studying
  • settling into accommodation
  • budgeting
  • module choices
  • assignments, essays and exams
  • finding housing for second year.

First year students can ask questions which they may not feel comfortable asking tutors, are not covered in the course handbook or are of a personal nature, and will get reliable and relevant advice from their peers. They also get to know other people on their course a lot better.

What are the benefits?

Students who choose to become a mentor in their second year develop important employability skills. In a competitive job market graduates need to be able to demonstrate transferable skills. This is a wonderful opportunity to develop, enhance and evidence those skills, such as:

  • communication
  • supervisory
  • organisational
  • time management
  • leadership
  • confidence building.

Where can I find out more?

For more information please contact Collette Gavan (Gavanc@edgehill.ac.uk)  

[SOURCE: Periodic review and re-validation of Computer Science].