Placement support app

What happens?

This app, which will be piloted from September 2017, is proposed to provide support and useful information to 3rd year students whilst on placement. It will enable them to have instant access to and understand issues such as safeguarding and conflict resolution. Practical details such as travel information will also be included.

What is the likely impact?

Students will have valuable information at their fingertips, enabling them to feel more confident in the placement area.

The new placement support app which has been developed in collaboration with the Computer Science department.

Following this pilot a professional staff development workshop will be scheduled, please see the CLT website to book your place and for immediate further information please contact:

Hayley McKenzie,mckenzih@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Global Public Health – Stage 2].

Supporting retention with ‘Transition Days’

Student ‘Transition Days’ at critical junctions within the programme which make effective use of contributions from Graduate Teaching Assistants

What happens?

The transition days generally evaluate well, however informal feedback from students has been extremely positive regarding the sessions delivered by the GTAs. They find the GTA role itself ‘aspirational’. They also refer to the fact that the GTAs are ‘more on their level’, and are very interested in how research can be an employment route. This has resulted in a number of our own students applying for GTA positions, one of whom was successful.

What is the likely impact?

AHSC have delivered transition days for a number of years prior to students’ return for the next academic level. For the last couple of years we have included GTAs to talk of their research interests and current roles in regard to potential employability routes that had not been considered by the undergraduate students.

 

To book to attend a Professional Staff Development Seminar on this topic please click here CLT.

For more information please contact: Peter Leadbetter, leadbetp@edgehill.ac.uk

 

[SOURCE: MSci (Hons) Nutrition – Stage 2].

Supporting students on work placement

The Department’s implementation of the academic post of Practice Education Lecturer to support the management of placements and the student experience

What happens?

This provides a physical FoHSC academic presence in the work-based learning area that facilitates open communication between placement, student and programme team. This enables effective and timely potential for problem solving/ information sharing on behalf of the student or the area itself. The quality role ensures that potential placement areas are suitable for individual students and can assist in ‘matching’ of placements to individual programmes. An auditing process ensures that we are at present providing high-quality placements focusing on the safety of our students. New placements have been identified, and more information regarding placement student capacity has been confirmed.

What is the impact?

Students have already fed back that they feel supported by the presence of the PEL. Open communication is enhanced. Expectations of the aims of the placement experience have been clearer. Academic member of staff ensures that any minor/ major academic issues impacting on students’ progression are addressed in a timely manner. This results in a better quality of work-based learning opportunities.

To book to attend a Professional Staff Development Seminar on this topic please click here CLT.

For more information please contact: 

Carol Wilson

wilsonc@edgehill.ac.uk

Gemma Holloway

Gemma.Holloway@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing; MSc Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing – Stage 2].

Getting Started student support package

The development of the ‘Getting Started’ pre-entry support package for students

What happens?

The Getting Started support package is designed to offer students a seamless transition and a preview into the process of learning at Edge Hill and specifically on their chosen programmes. This is beyond simply pre-course reading, engaging students in becoming familiar with potential sources that will underpin their learning in level 4 and beyond.

What is the likely impact?

Students who have chosen EHU as their Higher Education provider are brought into the learning community before they have even enrolled on campus. The student is embraced and supported to recognise potential key sources, to be exposed to potential learning materials, and to feel they have made inroads into their learning by the time they arrive on campus for their induction week.

To book to attend a Professional Staff Development Seminar on this topic please click here CLT.

For more information please contact Carol Wilson, wilsonc@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing; MSc Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing – Stage 2].

‘Transition Days’

The format and content of ‘Transition Days’ at Levels 4 to 5, and 5 to 6

What happens?

The transition days offer students the opportunity to attend sessions, outside of semester one and two, to learn and be informed about the transition they will be making, academically and also personally, between either levels 4-5 or 5-6 in their student journey.

All undergraduate students will face these transitions, which include the jump in academic expectation, personal demands, the need for resilience and their destination planning; as such, it is felt that the transition days could be an integral part of all programmes across the University.

What is the likely impact?

Students are able to see their own journey, to assess their current skills base, and to consider where they might need help and support in moving to the next stage of their academic journey. The sessions are very practical and are designed to offer students the ability to start planning ahead for the next academic year.

To book to attend a Professional Staff Development Seminar on this topic please click here CLT.

For more information please contact Hazel Flight, flighth@edgehill.ac.uk  or Peter Leadbetter

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing – Stage 2].

Personal Development Planning (PDP) ‘Steps to Success’

The approach to Personal Development Planning (PDP) via the ‘Steps to Success’ model

What happens?

This model offers a theoretical representation of the PDP when aligned to the University’s employability themes, and the development of the student in relation to their research knowledge and capacity. The PDP is designed to align to the student journey and has been embedded across levels 4, 5 and 6.  Given the embedded nature of this model, there is therefore potential for other settings to transfer this same model into their own curriculum.

 

What is the likely impact?

Students have been able to visualise the PDP and recognise its value in their development. The students have been completing the PDP as a natural part of their student journey and as such, the PDP has become integral to their development.

To book to attend a Professional Staff Development Seminar on this topic please click here CLT.

For more information please contact:

Hayley McKenzie, mckenzih@edgehill.ac.uk

Laura Ashton, ashtonl@edgehill.ac.uk

Shelly Haslam, haslamsh@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing; MSc Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing – Stage 2].

Engaging students

The integration of the students’ role both in the identification of placements and in their feedback on placement experience back into the teaching within the programme

What happens?

It was felt that students should be central to decision-making about placements. Where they may already be involved with placements, having them share these experiences was felt to be beneficial to the programme.

Using their placement experiences will add a depth and richness to the class discussions and is anticipated to deepen the value of learning on placements. Having students engaged in approaching placement providers adds ownership to that placement and develops their own networking skills, which is transferable to all settings.

What is the likely impact?

Directly, this will support improving placement opportunities by widening the resource base; it may indirectly also lead to enhancing learning from placement. Giving students choice and capacity to approach placement providers is expected to provide opportunity for reflection and personal development.

For more information please contact:

Shelly Haslam, haslamsh@edgehill.ac.uk

Gemma Holloway, Gemma.Holloway@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing; MSc Child & Adolescent Mental Health and Wellbeing – Stage 1].