Overseas student exchanges

The incorporation of global dimensions within the programme through the successful development and promotion of overseas student exchanges

What happened?

Edge Hill’s Paramedic Department and Saimaa University, Finland share best practice, specifically around clinical simulation and practical assessments. Students exchange between the departments twice a year, sharing knowledge and experience of professional clinical practice. This venture was set up very quickly and has had a direct impact on students and the local community. Future work between the institutions will involve international peer critique of working practice and evidence-based care and online live stream critique of clinical simulations.

Edge Hill’s Paramedic team has also developed a link with the University of Johannesburg and will be sending students to South Africa for the first time in 2017 to partake in a multi-agency exercise. The department has thus demonstrated the ease of setting up international partnerships. Following the collaboration with Edge Hill, some students from Saimaa University have since gained employment with the North West Ambulance Service resulting in a directly positive impact on the local community. Students have benefitted through integration of new high tech simulation facilities at St James’ in Manchester that were purchased from Finland. Simulation set up, feedback and overall management have been replicated from best working practice in Finland, further preparing students for clinical practice.

A new 3D immersive simulation suite is being installed at St James’ following a review of its impact on student learning in Finland.

An overnight scenario and team building exercise has been incorporated into the first year of the programme following work with the University of Johannesburg. Further to this, a student exchange is being developed enabling Edge Hill students the opportunity to partake in a multi-disciplinary exercise in South Africa commencing September 2017.

An increased knowledge base, and dissemination of international paramedic evidence-based practice has been embedded within the curriculum.

For more information please contact Andrew Kirk,

Kirka@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Paramedic Practice].

Enrichment opportunities

The student-led Midwifery Society which is supported by the Department to enrich the student learning experience

What happens?

The Midwifery Society creates a recognised forum to develop an EHU community for student midwives. A Society with elected committee members promotes communication among peers and enhances a collegiate approach to sharing knowledge. In addition, a recognised forum raises the profile of the University through a series of study events and conferences at reduced/ minimal costs.

Attendance at study events/ conferences organised by the Midwifery Society has encouraged members of the Society to participate in evidence-based learning and networking opportunities. This year, the Society has organised two study events attracting national speakers at significantly reduced costs for members. Additionally, the Society has facilitated the second annual ‘mentor in practice awards’. This positive event strengthens the department’s relationship with practice placement providers.

This year, the President of the Society was a finalist for the national Student Midwife of the Year 2017 award from the Royal College of Midwives.

For further information please contact the President of the Midwifery Society by visiting:

https://www.edgehillsu.org.uk/groups/midwifery-society–5

https://en-gb.facebook.com/EHUMidwiferySociety/

https://twitter.com/EHUMidwifery

[SOURCE: MSc Midwifery].

Enriching the student experience

Including students in professional networks, conferences and field trips

What happened?

Students are provided with the opportunity to engage in networking with a diverse group of nutrition and food professionals. It enables them to link the taught theory with practical applications in academia and industry. It helps them recognise the relevance of their learning on their future careers. Transferable skills include the ability to develop professional communication skills and maintaining up-to-date knowledge within the subject area.

What is the likely impact?

The students are enabled to see the scope and diversity of their subject. It also allows them to acknowledge that there are career opportunities within their particular areas of interest. Conferences and field trips also contribute towards helping them relate the theory learned to practice or real world settings.

For more information please contact:

Genevieve Stone

stoneg@edgehill.ac.uk

Kathleen Mooney

mooneyka@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: MSci (Hons) Nutrition – Stage 1].

Enterprise Awards

The nomination of students for Enterprise Awards

What happened?

Students have learned a number of transferable skills through the development of new business innovations such as networking, communication with external bodies, budgeting, costing and producing a business plan. It gives the students an opportunity to be creative within an otherwise very scientific subject area.

What is the impact?

This has impacted directly on the students’ confidence to present and pitch a unique product which is related to the subject area they are studying. It also enhances communication skills, professionalism, resourcefulness and team working.

 

For more information please contact:

Hazel Flight

flighth@edgehill.ac.uk

John Mercer

mercerj@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: MSci (Hons) Nutrition – Stage 1].

Students become research assistants!

Providing opportunities to encourage students to become research assistants

What happens?

It is more typical for students to be taught the theory of research, rather than taking part in the actual live research process. Students are given the opportunity and encouraged to take part in actual research activities led by lecturers on the programme. This will enable them to transfer skills such as team work, time management, research data collection skills and communication skills.

What is the impact?

This directly impacts on students by developing their ability to acknowledge the relevance of the taught theory elements within the programme. It will also highlight the importance of current research alongside developing and enhancing their understanding of the research process and their practical primary research data collection skills.

For more information please contact: Claire Blennerhassett, Claire.blennerhassett@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: MSci (Hons) Nutrition – Stage 1].

Compulsory Paediatric First Aid for all students

Research indicates that there is a statistically-significant relationship between average grades and students’ participation in enrichment activities. This is also supported by the current students’ positive feedback. Enrichment activities can be incorporated into any relevant full-time undergraduate programme of studies, and therefore are fully transferable.

What happens?

The inclusion of compulsory Paediatric First Aid for all students. Early Years Education is the only Department on campus to deliver this training through Millie’s Trust. Other programmes where students are likely to work with children in this age group may benefit from this practice.

What is the likely impact?

Increased employability opportunities; high levels of student satisfaction. Enhances student employability by ensuring that they enter the workplace with the first aid skills required to work safely with children in the 0-7 age group.

 

For more information about the impact of this strategy please contact                            Karen Boardman, boardmac@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BA (Hons) Working and Teaching in the Early Years – Stage 2].

[SOURCE: BA (Hons) Working and Teaching in the Early Years – Stage 1].