Graduate Employer Symposium

Who/What?

Employers from various Applied Health and Social Care field were invited to the Faculty of health to showcase their organisation and deliver a 20 to 30 minute presentation on their application process and the types of graduate skills and attributes they were looking for. Post graduate programme leads were also invited to talk about the application process for PGCE teaching, Masters in Social Work and MSc in Leadership and Management, MRES and PHD graduate teacher posts. AHSC Alumni were also invited to talk to students about job searching and applications. Current students on the Personal Career Development module were invited to attend.

So What?

Students found the session extremely valuable as it enabled them to network with graduate employers such as NSPCC, Frontline. Nutricia, Dannone and other Private and Voluntary organisation. Additionally they were able to meet the programme teams from Masters and PGCE programmes at Edge Hill. Talking first hand to graduates who had been through the application process proved extremely beneficial for CV development and interview techniques. Some students commented on how this had shaped their career plans and highlighted the skills required for this.

 

Working Lunch!

What happens?

At this time of year with placements looming and assessment deadlines on the horizon, not to mention 1st Teaching Posts to apply for, time is of the essence.

So to support students during this potentially difficult period of time, over in Design and Technology teaching spaces are booked over the lunch period, which provides not only a few hours per week of additional contact time, but helps to create and maintain a collegiate, industrious working atmosphere.

Staff stay around after the formal contact time and are on hand to offer additional support, which also at this frantic period in the students journey is very much appreciated by the students.

What are the benefits? 

This approach has proven to contribute positively to the students attendance, engagement, attainment, and also has had a positive impact on the students general feelings of well-being.

Working lunches have proven to be so popular where possible students have also been coming in early for ‘breakfast club’!

For more information about the benefits of this initiative on students well-being, engagement and attainment please contact:

David Wooff, Wooffd@edgehill.ac.uk

 

Overseas student exchanges

The incorporation of global dimensions within the programme through the successful development and promotion of overseas student exchanges

What happened?

Edge Hill’s Paramedic Department and Saimaa University, Finland share best practice, specifically around clinical simulation and practical assessments. Students exchange between the departments twice a year, sharing knowledge and experience of professional clinical practice. This venture was set up very quickly and has had a direct impact on students and the local community. Future work between the institutions will involve international peer critique of working practice and evidence-based care and online live stream critique of clinical simulations.

Edge Hill’s Paramedic team has also developed a link with the University of Johannesburg and will be sending students to South Africa for the first time in 2017 to partake in a multi-agency exercise. The department has thus demonstrated the ease of setting up international partnerships. Following the collaboration with Edge Hill, some students from Saimaa University have since gained employment with the North West Ambulance Service resulting in a directly positive impact on the local community. Students have benefitted through integration of new high tech simulation facilities at St James’ in Manchester that were purchased from Finland. Simulation set up, feedback and overall management have been replicated from best working practice in Finland, further preparing students for clinical practice.

A new 3D immersive simulation suite is being installed at St James’ following a review of its impact on student learning in Finland.

An overnight scenario and team building exercise has been incorporated into the first year of the programme following work with the University of Johannesburg. Further to this, a student exchange is being developed enabling Edge Hill students the opportunity to partake in a multi-disciplinary exercise in South Africa commencing September 2017.

An increased knowledge base, and dissemination of international paramedic evidence-based practice has been embedded within the curriculum.

For more information please contact Andrew Kirk,

Kirka@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Paramedic Practice].

Developing undergraduate research skills

The focus on, and development of, students’ research skills at undergraduate Level 4 and beyond

What happens?

Students find the skills requisite for a successful dissertation difficult to develop from a standing start at L6. The aim is to introduce the relevant skills at L4 and develop them further at L5 such that they are highly developed by the time students reach L6. This ‘whole degree’ approach to dissertation success is innovative and one that could be utilised by all degree programmes.

What is the impact?

Students are almost immediately exposed to the demands of project work on starting their degree. This is delivered as part of the Cyprus field course and also requires working under pressure to tight deadlines. A similar approach is taken at L5 but with smaller group sizes and projects of longer duration. The successful addressing of these challenges engenders self-confidence alongside developing relevant skills of planning, time management, practical skills, analysis and communication of results, ultimately leading to higher dissertation scores and hence degree grades.

 

For more information please contact: Professor Paul Ashton

ashtonp@edgehill.ac.uk

[SOURCE: BSc (Hons) Food Science & BSc (Hons) Plant Science – Stage 2].