Tag Archives: mapping

Liver and Mash


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I’ve already blogged about my own Mashed Library Liverpool talk but I promised to say something about the rest of the event, so here goes!

Mandy Phillips and Owen Stephens

The day kicked off with welcome and introductions from Mandy and Owen. I’d heard bits about Mashed Library events before and I know the basics of Mashups but I didn’t really know who would be there and and what to expect. There was a good mix of attendees and speakers presenting “lightening talks”, “Pecha Kucha 20:20″ talks and workshops. The thing that persuaded me to agree to speak and convinced me that it wouldn’t just be a bunch of librarians (!!) was the scattering of local speakers…

Alison Gow

Alison is Executive Editor (Digital) for Trinity Mirror Merseyside, publishers of the Liverpool Daily Post and Echo. Despite “knowing” her through the Twitter, Friday’s Mashed Libraries event was the first time I’d met her IRL! The slides of her talk “Open Curation of Data” are online covering some of the things journalists and the newspaper industry have had to deal with since the superinterweb came along.

Aidan McGuire and Julian Todd

Aidan and Julian demonstrated ScraperWiki a project supported by 4iP and aiming free data from inaccessible sources and make it available for those who wish to use it in new and innovative ways, for example mashups. “Screen Scraping” isn’t a new idea but typically it’s done by individuals, embedded into their own systems. If the scraped website changes then the feed breaks and there’s no way for others to build on the work done.

ScraperWiki aims to change that by providing a community driven source for storing scrapers. It’s like Wikipedia for code allowing you to take and modify a scraper I’ve written for your own purposes.

There are already dozens of scraped data sources and more are being added every day. It currently supports Python but my language of choice – PHP – will be added soon so I’ll be giving it a go then.

John McKerrell

John’s talk about mapping had the most interest so he presented it to all attendees briefly covering mapping APIs, OpenStreetMap and tracking your location with mapme.at.

Phil Bradley

The first Pecha Kucha 20:20 talk was about social media search tools. I wasn’t writing down the links so check on Phil’s Slideshare page for the presentation coming out. I will say that Google’s support for Twitter is now much better than he seemed to suggest – for example allowing you to drill into tweets for a particular time. It can also be more reliable than search.twitter.com when using shared IP addresses at a conference.

Gary Green

Gary mentioned that this was his first presentation so I’m not sure a 20:20 talk was the best idea but he handled it pretty well!

Tony Hirst

The afternoon was dedicated to one of three workshops – Arduino with Adrian Mcewen, Mapping with John McKerrell or Mashups with Tony Hirst. I’ve done a bit of each before so I sat at the back of Tony’s talk to try to soak up some new tips.

After a final cake break there was the prize giving for the mashup suggestions competition.

So all in all a really interesting day! Congratulations to Mandy Phillips and all the organising team for an excellent event.

2010: The Year of Open Data?

I don’t like to predict the future – usually because I’m wrong – but I’m going to put my neck out on one point for the coming year.  2010 will be the year that data becomes important.

I’ve long been a believer in opening up sources of data.  As far as possible, we try to practice what we preach by supplying feeds of courses, news stories, events and so on.  We also make extensive use of our own data feeds so I’m always interested to see what other people are doing.  Over the last year there has been growing support for opening up data to see what can be done with it and there’s potentially more exciting stuff to come.

A big part of what many consider to be “Web 2.0” is open APIs to allow connections to be made and they have undoubtedly let to the success of services like Twitter.

Following in their footsteps have been journalists, both professional and amateur, who are making increasing use of data sources and in many cases republishing them.  The MPs expenses issue showed an interesting contrast in approaches.  While the Daily Telegraph broke the story and relied on internal man power to trawl through the receipts for juicy information the Guardian took a different route.  As soon as the redacted details were published, the Guardian launched a website allowing the public to help sort through pages and identify pages of interest.  Both the Guardian and the Times have active data teams releasing much of their sources for the public to mashup.

The non commercial sector have produced arguably more useful sources of data.  MySociety have a set of sites which do some really cool things to help the public better engage with their community and government.

In the next few months there looks set to be even more activity.  The government asked Tim B-L to advise on ways to make the government more open and whether due to his influence or other factors there are changes on the horizon.

But it’s set to be the election, which must be held before [June], which could do the most.  Data-based projects look set to pop up everywhere.  One project – The Straight Choice – will track flyers and leaflets distributed by candidates in order to track promises during and after the election.  Tweetminster tracks Twitter accounts belonging to MPs and PPCs and has some nice tools to visualise and engage with them.

I believe there will be an increasing call for Higher Education to open up its data.  Whether that’s information about courses using the XCRI format, or getting information out of the institutional VLE in a format that suits the user not the developer, there is lots that can be done.  I’m not pretending this is an easy task but surely if it can be done it should because it’s the right thing to do.

Since I started writing this entry a few days ago, the Google Blog post on The Meaning of Open. Of course they say things much better than I could, so I’ll leave you with one final quote:

Open will win. It will win on the Internet and will then cascade across many walks of life: The future of government is transparency. The future of commerce is information symmetry. The future of culture is freedom. The future of science and medicine is collaboration. The future of entertainment is participation. Each of these futures depends on an open Internet.

Let’s do our bit to contribute to that future.

The end of Argleton is nigh!

I mentioned Argleton a year ago, Mister Roy has walked there and even the Ormskirk Advertiser has covered the issue but soon its days may be numbered!

Google has announced a new feature to allow users to report problems and suggest changes to maps. It’s currently only available in the US but you can see how it will work on this video:

I’ll be slightly sorry to see Argleton go but I’ll be glad to have my childhood home back!

Via Webmonkey.

Google Renames Village

I grew up in Aughton – that’s the bit stuck on the bottom of Ormskirk.  I lived there for most of my life but Google wants to wipe it off the face of the planet!

Okay, it probably doesn’t – their motto is “Do No Evil” after all – but the power of Google has renamed Aughton to Argleton.

I’m not sure which gazetteer they use but either other people use it too, or other sites are using the Google geocoder as the basis of their site because you can do all sorts of things in Argleton!  From jobs, to hotels – even my old primary school!  As more and more “Web 2.0″ services make use APIs, we’re placing our trust into a small number of services to provide good data with no clear way of challenging the accuracy of it.

Please Google, don’t take away my childhood!